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Full text of "Maryland"

LIBRARY -COLLEGE PARK 




Maryland & Rare Book R'c 

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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



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PUBLICATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY o£ MARYLAN 

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Vol. XXIII November-December No. 1 



M 



ARYLANP 

PUBLICATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY •' MARYLAND 
ALUMNI 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and, entered at the Post Office, Col- 
lege Park, Md., as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 
$3.00 per year. Fifty cents the copy. 



HARVEY L. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Maryland 



SALLY LADIN OCDEN. Advertising Director 

3". : t N. Charles Street 

Caltiirore 18, Md. 



'. 'NE DAYTON BARKER 

Circulation Manager 

University of Marvland 

College Park. Md. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Talbot T. Speer '17, President 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12 Vice-President 



Officers 

Mrs. Florence Duke '50, Vice-President 
David L. Brigham '38. Executive Secretary 



Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — L. C. Burns '23, J. Homer Remsburg '18, Dr. Howard L. Stier '32. 

ARTS & SCIENCES BOARD— Edward M. Rider '47, Frederick S. DeMarr '49, Loy M. Shipp, Jr. '43. 

BUSINESS AND PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— Egbert F. Tingley '27, Joseph C. Longridge '26. 

Talbot T. Speer 17. 
EDUCATION— Judson Bell '41 : Mrs. Florence Duke '50, Mrs. Helena Haines '34. 
ENGINEERING — Colonel O. H. Saunders '10, S. Chester Ward '32. C. V. Koons '29. 
HOME ECONOMICS — Ruth McRae '27, Mrs. Mary F. Chaney '42. Mrs. Mary R. Langford '26. 
DENTISTRY— Dr. C. Adam Bock '22, Dr. Arthur I. Bell '19, Dr. Harry B. McCarthy '23. 
LAW — J. Gilbert Prendergast '33, John Grason Turnbull '32, G. Kenneth Reiblich. 

MEDICINE— William H. Triplett. M.D. '11, John A. Wagner, M.D. '38. Thurston R. Adams. M.D. '34. 
NURSING — Miss Flora Street '38, Miss Ruth Ellen Hines '47. Miss June E. Geiser '47. 
PHARMACY— Dr. Frank Slama '24. Joseph Cohen '29, Frank L. Black '04. 

Clubs 

BALTIMORE CLUB— Dr. Albert E. Goldstein 12. "M" CLUB — Joseph H. Deckman. '31 Engr. 
NEW YORK CLUB— Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. EX-OFFICIO— Dr. H. C. Byrd '08. 

CUMBERLAND CLUB — Dr. J. Russell Cook '23 Dent David L. Brigham '38. 



I'yCflOGS 




FOR 

nil 



BETTE 

LESS 



FOR ADEQUATE ENGLISH 

"Americans are at a disadvantage in relation- 
ships with educated Englishmen," declares Dr. 
H. C. Byrd (pictured above), President of the 
University of Maryland, adding, "lack of vo- 
cabulary engenders the use of profanity." 



IT WAS fall registration day at Col- 
lege Park. A camera crew from 
Life busied itself with photographing 
members of a group of students on a 
parity with the high level of feminine 
pulchritude long accepted as standard 
at the University of Maryland. 

A movie camera was grinding away 
on a registration day short film in- 
tended for video presentation, quite in 
the same manner that the State De- 
partment had previously employed in 
producing a feature designed for for- 
eign consumption as illustrative of edu- 
cation in the United States. The Air 
Force had similarly picturized, for 
countrywide presentation, the largest 
Air Force R.O.T.C. in the nation. 

In the Front Rank 

Such incidents, increasing from year 
to year, impel even the casual observer 
to adduce that the University of Mary- 
land has long since graduated into the 
top echelon of American institutions of 
higher learning. Attestation to this 
verity manifests itself in laudatory ar- 
ticles regarding the University or its 
President in such leading national pub- 
lications as Colliers, Saturday Evening 
Post, Time, Pathfinder and others, as 
well as in editorial praise in newspapers 
such as the Boston Herald. This situ- 
ation, however, is hardly expected to 
arride the certain Baltimore newspaper 
which, apparently, requires that re- 
porters assigned to anti-University 
stories type such traducement only 
when handicapped by a ten-point attack 
of agnail. 

A recent tribute to the University 



and President H. C. Byrd consisted of 
reference in national magazines to a 
newspaper story in which Dr. Byrd de- 
plored the lack of adequate use, by 
Americans, of the English language. 
Correspondent Price Day, of the Bal- 
timore Morning Sun, had voiced the 
opinion that this subject, a favorite 
one with President Byrd, constituted a 
very good story. That Mr. Day was 
correct in that assumption was reflected 
in references to the story in the columns 
of several national magazines. At Col- 
lege Park Dr. Byrd's opinion to the 
effect that too many college graduates 
gc into the world insufficiently equipped 
in the use of the English language, is 
not a new asseveration. He has ex- 
pressed the same opinion in public ad- 
dresses on repeated occasions. In Dr. 
Byrd's opinion this deficiency is general 
in the nation's schools, and is not con- 
fined to Maryland. In some ways, he 
stated, in his interview with Mr. Day, 
Maryland is ahead of many others in 
the teaching of English. 

Valuable Tool 

Particularly in departments devoted 
to scientific and professional studies, 
he said, students are apt not to be able 
to use the language "as a tool" in their 
own work. 

As a corrective measure, he sug- 
gested that written work in such de- 
partments might be required to pass 
the test of good English, as well as of 
technical content, with the two marks 
constituting a final grade. 

Thus, Dr. Byrd said, the students 
would receive additional instruction in 
work in their particular lines, and 
added, as reported by Mr. Day, "If 
you're going to attract a lot of foreign 
students, you've got to accept that as 
an obligation." 

Among Americans, Dr. Byrd de- 
clared, an inability to use the language 
effectively has made it difficult for them 
to explain to other peoples the values 
of their way of life; has fostered the 
use of profanity, for lack of other 
means of expression and has put Amer- 
icans at a disadvantage in relationships 
with educated Englishmen. 

Dr. Byrd stated that several reasons 
might be given for this. 

Inadequate Preparation 

"First," he stated, "it is the fact that 
most of them come out of the second- 
ary schools with inadequate prepara- 
tion in English. Then, to this is added 
the factor that colleges and universities 
do not give as much instruction as 
they should. 

"If one wishes an example of how 
deficient even the best of college gradu- 
ates may be in the use of English," Dr. 
Byrd continued, "he should read some 
of the dissertations written by candi- 
dates for the doctorate degree— writ- 

[2] 



II ENGLISH 
PROFANIT, 

President Byrd, Stressing 
Importance of Use of Good 
English, Brands Profanity as 
Cheap Substitute for Ade- 
quate Vocabulary 

By Harvey L. Miller 

Managing Editor 

ten, it might be mentioned, three years 
after the baccalaureate degree has 
been achieved. 

"Very few of these dissertations," 
the Maryland President went on to say, 
"are acceptable until after they have 
been edited by someone more ade- 
quately educated in his own language 
than the candidate for the doctorate 
himself." 

Many of the undergraduates cur- 
ricula in the colleges and universities 
carry only one year of freshman Eng- 
lish, with possibly an additional year 
of sophomore work, as a requisite for 
graduation, Dr. Byrd said. 

Basic English Stressed 

He added that these courses are often 
concerned with composition and litera- 
ture, not with the "basic English" a 
student could use in his life after col- 
lege. 

"If he's going to be a good salesman 
of himself, salesmanship requires that 
he be able to express himself in writing 
and orally," Dr. Byrd declared. 

"The average business man, the aver- 
age doctor, or the average man in any 
walk of life, is unable to express him- 
self as well as he should," Dr. Byrd 
stated. 

"The American businessman talking 
with an educated Britisher, for in- 
stance, is usually ill at ease because 
the average American businessman is 
somewhat abashed in being unable to 
use his own language as effectively as 
the Englishman to whom he is talk- 
ing," Dr. Byrd went on to say. 

It is lack of vocabulary, he said, that 
engenders the use of profanity. 
Not Expressive 

"There is no type of profanity that 
is one fourth as expressive as would 
be the use of good words, properly 
placed in a sentence, and simple sen- 
tences well placed in a paragraph," the 
University's President declared. 

"You hear such expressions as, 'It's 
hot as hell.' And then when the winter 
comes the expression will be turned to, 
'It's cold as hell.' Hell could not be 
both cold and hot in the sense of the 
meaning of the word. It is thus used 
because the average man does not have 
the vocabulary adequate to express his 
feelings." 

The basic reason for failure to 
achieve a command of the language, Dr. 
Ryrd said, is that the average Ameri- 



can boy or girl has never been taught 
that language is a major "tool" in all 
professions and businesses. 

"Therefore, not realizing its impor- 
tance, the student is inclined to put 
as little time and effort on his own 
language as he can conveniently get 
by with doing," he said. 

"In this connection," Dr. Byrd con- 
tinued, "it might be mentioned that the 
scientists who build up the curricula, 
and other groups and departments out- 
side the English Department, are far 
more interested in the fields of chemis- 
try, or bacteriology, or engineering, or 
economics, than they are in having their 
students learn to use their own lan- 
guage effectively." 

Four Main Jobs 

A change in the attitude of the aver- 
age student toward English is the re- 
sponsibility of the secondary schools, 
which should at least teach pupils to 
spell, punctuate and construct simple 
sentences before they go to college, Dr. 
Byrd declared. 

"Under present-day conditions, there 
are, in English, four main jobs to be 
done on the average university cam- 
pus," he added. 

"One is the education and training 
of people who are going into the writ- 
ing profession, in which they take Eng- 
lish and literature as a major," Dr. 
Byrd went on to say. 

"Second is the training of teachers 
for the high schools and colleges and 
universities, who will make a profession 
of teaching, he continued. 

"Third is the education of foreign 
students who have very little knowl- 
edge, sometimes no knowledge at all, 
of English, and who are coming to the 
American universities and colleges in 
larger and larger numbers," the Mary- 
land President added. 

"These three classes constitute a 
small minority, but much greater em- 
phasis is laid on these than is laid on 
the greater body of students who will 
use English as a tool for numerous 
other professions or businesses into 
which they will enter," Dr. Byrd con- 
cluded, emphasizing that institutions 
of higher learning should be "vitally 
concerned" about the latter group. 

Too Much "Hell" 

Dr. Byrd's opinion regarding the use 
of profanity as a substitute for in- 
adequate vocabulary, particularly as 
to the use of "hot as hell' and "cold as 
hell," suggests that an extremely lim- 
ited vocabulary is indicated when "cold 
as Greenland" and "hot as the Sahara" 
would have ideally suited the two ex- 
tremes of temperature involved. 

The writer recalls the occasion, in 
1924, upon which President Clark Grif- 
fith, of the Washington Baseball Club, 
a gentleman who features as his most 
expletive exclamations, "By sin!" or 
"Consarn!" and who shared with the 
late Walter Johnson the reputation of 
having "the cleanest mouth in base- 
ball," summoned sports writers to tell 
them that Stanley Harris had been 
signed to pilot the Washington team. 
President Griffith announced, "We've 
got a hell of a manager!" To all of 



us Griff clearly conveyed that he had 
a good manager. However, he could 
have used the identical expression with 
different emphasis to indicate that he 
had a very poor manager. 

I'athfinder's Comment 

Intrigued by Dr. Byrd's reference to 
the indiscriminate use of "hell," Path- 
finder, in its Education Department, re- 
called that some 20 years ago L. W. 
Merryweather, in American Speech, 
presented 14 versions of the erroneous 
use of the word, viz: - 

"The equivalent of negative adverbs 
... as in the hell you say. 

"A super-superlative, as in colder 
than lull. 

"An adverb of all work, as in run 
like hell and hate like hell. 

"An intensifier of questions, as in 
what the hell . . . ? _who the hell . . . ? 

"An intensifier of asservations, as 
in Hell, yes! 

"An intensifier of qualities, as in hell 
of a price. 

"An indicator of intensified experi- 
ence, as in hell of a time. 

"In a nearly literal sense, as in Go 
to hell, to hell with . . . 

"A synonym for uproar or turmoil, 
as in Hell is loose. 

"A verb, to hell around. 

"An adjective, a hellish hurry. 

"In combination with other nouns, 
as in hell's bells, hell-raiser. 

"In derivatives, as hellion. 

A simple expletive, as Oh, hell!" 

In "The Virginian" 

The use of profanity is not only an 
indication of inadequate vocabulary, as 
Dr. Byrd states, but, as most generally 
used, is meaningless because, in many 
instances, real "fighting words" are ac- 
cepted as terms of endearment. This 
is particularly true in the armed serv- 
ices where such terms as, "You old 

, it sure is swell to see 

you," or "You old , when did 

you get back?" are nothing but friendly 
greetings. In The Virginian, Owen 
Wister built the book's best scene 
around the Virginian's reply to Tram- 
pas' profane greeting. It was, "When 
YOU say that, smile!" Steve, the Vir- 
ginian's friend, employed as a greeting 
the same words that could have cost 
Trampas his life. 

After Guadalcanal there was a joint 
report signed by various chaplains to 
the effect that the use of profanity in 
the services was accepted as "friendly 
greetings," and "terms of endearment." 

Nonetheless, the use of profane lan- 
guage is against regulations and, every 
now and then, some General or other 
gets out an order against it. 

Here's one from General Head- 
quarters: - 

"The General is sorry to be informed 
that the foolish, and wicked practice, 
of profane cursing and swearing (a 
vice heretofore little known in an Amer- 
ican Army) is growing into fashion; 
he hopes the officers will, by example, 
as well as influence, endeavor to check 
it, and that both they, and the men will 
reflect, that we can. have little hopes 
of the blessing of Heaven on our arms, 
if we insult it by our impiety, and 




Harris & Ewing Photo 

USED GOOD ENGLISH 

Madame Chiang Kai-Shek who in a speech 
before Congress, precipitated a hegira dictionary- 
ward by use of words such as "transigent" and 
"obtunded." 



folly; added to this, it is a vice so mean 
and low, without any temptation, that 
every man of sense, and character, de- 
tests and despises it." 

That one, dated New York, August 
3, 1776 was signed "G. Washington." 

Meaningless Expressions 

Since its general use is recognized 
as being meaningless, the case against 
profanity as a tawdry substitute for 
other words stands additionally accused 
of being entirely unnecessary and such 
indictment includes the use of such ob- 
vious substitute for profanity as "for 
cripes sake," "gosh darn," etc. 

Profanity, as we know it, is American 
In German, for instance, literal trans- 
lation of our most used profane utter- 
ances would be meaningless, while 
fighting words in German are such as 
"Kamel" and "Luder," the latter being 
a noun designating all animals with 
cloven hoofs. Japan has no profanity 
as we know it. If a Nipponese wants to 
read off another he applies the names 
of various vegetables, the most insult- 
ing of which is one which grows only 
in a soil rich with manure. 

"Order in the Court!" 

Colonel William W. Stickney, barris- 
ter, recalls an incident in a District of 
Columbia court room, referring to the 
use of both good English and profanity. 
A certain miscreant listened to the pro- 
nouncement of the sentence, "Five 
years on each of three counts, the sen- 
tences to run concurrently." 

The prisoner mumbled a sot to rocr 
curse but the judge was an accom- 
plished lip reader. "Change that last 
word," said the judge, from "concur- 
rently" to "consecutively." "What the 
hell's the difference?" mumbled the pris- 
oner. His lawyer enlightened him with, 
"You'll learn that the hard way." 

Dr. Byrd's reference to punctuation 
as a part of good English recalled the 
story about the native of Iowa who told 
about a fellow Iowan moving to Mis- 
souri and, crossing the line into the 



[3] 



latter State looked back at Iowa and 
muttered, "Goodbye God! I'm going to 
Missouri." A Missourian immediately 
replied that what the man had really 
said was, "Good! By God, I'm going to 
Missouri!" 

It appears proper here to point out 
that most of us are extremely careless 
in our daily use of the vocabulary we 
do have at hand. In normal conversa- 
tion few of us utilize the English of 
which we make use in writing or in 
public addresses. 

In Every-Day Conversation 

Indeed, use of such correct language 
oftimes brings expressed opinion to the 
effect that the individual using it is 
"high hat," and "high falutin' " or the 
allegation that "he must have swallowed 
a dictionary." Incidentally not a bad 
book to digest. 

Not long ago a certain young lady 
asked her grandfather if he wished to 
accompany her to a motion picture. Not 
wishing to do so the fellow declined. 
The young lady remarked, "Only a few 
days ago you expressed a desire to 
attend a showing of that film." In 
some quarters the youngster would be 
labeled as "upstage" by fellows who 
would have said, "You said you wanted 
to go." 

There is inclination in various sec- 
tions of our country to ridicule correct 
English used in other parts. The 
South's "you all" is probably the chief 
target in that premise. Writers and 
actors, believing they portray a South- 
erner by its use, oftimes employ "you 
all" in the second person singular, 
whereas even the most uneducated 
Southerner never uses it except in the 
second person plural. 

"You All",— St. Paul 

"You all" was good enough English 
for the Apostle Paul as witness, in the 
second epistle to the Corinthians, "Hav- 
ing confidence in you all," "that my joy 
is the joy of you all" and "that I may 
not overcharge you all." 

"You all" apparently was considered 
good English by William Shakespeare 
who, in Julius Caesar, has Marc Antony 
saying, "You all did see that on the 
Lupercal I thrice presented him a 
kingly crown," and, "You all did love 
him once." 

"Carry Him Back to ... " 

A certain highly rated TV comedian 
is one of the most consistent offenders 
in mis-application of "you all." It has 
been suggested that he be invited to 
spend a vacation south of the Mason- 
Dixon line because that is where hams 
are cured. 

Some years ago we served at sea with 
a lad from Maine who, to indicate that 
he was under no obligation to a certain 
shipmate said, "I am not beholden unto 
him." Archaic, but correct English. 
Others began to use the same and simi- 
lar expressions. 

In public addresses, in print, on tele- 
vision, the fine distinctions existing, for 
instance, between the uses of "imply" 
and "infer," "Inference" and "implica- 
tion" are seldom drawn in these days 
of sloppy speech when smart aleck 
"cuties" like "You can say THAT 
again!", "You're telling ME?" or "I'll 



MARYLAND'S A.F.R.O.T.C. ON TV 

EVERY Sunday nite during the 
month of November, the Univer- 
sity of Maryland Air Force R.O.T.C. will 
present a half hour television show on 
Station WBAL-TV. Starting at six P.M. 
EST, channel 11, the thirty-minute live 
shows originating in WBAL's studios 
will range from world political geogra- 
phy and theory of flight to radar and 
electronics and jet engines. 



tell the cockeyed world!" are accepted 
as clever up-to-the-minute conversation. 
"Don't" and "doesn't" are used care- 
lessly and indiscriminately by people 
who do and should know better. 

Not long ago, on a TV quiz program, 
a college graduate of commissioned 
military rank was unable to define 
the words "cygnet" and "colloquy." If 
proof of Dr. Byrd's assertions was 
needed that TV incident provided it in 
two words totaling five syllables. 

"Don't Give Up the Ship!" 

During one recent evening before a 
video screen, nationally famous announc- 
ers and actors, produced a kaleidoscopic 
review of split infinitives, glaring ex- 
amples of sentences ending in preposi- 
tions, and a half dozen perpetrations 
cf "he don't." The evening ground on 
into sports with an announcement, 
"Both men weigh exactly 150 pounds." 
That would make each of them tip the 
Fairbanks - Morse equipment at 75 
pounds; not quite light enough to drown 
in a Dixie cup, a fate wished upon the 
announcer by a teacher of English who, 
by that time, was in the throes of teeth- 
gnashing agony. While video had thus 
presented clear illustrations of Dr. 
Byrd's contentions, American history 
also received startling mention. In 
tribute to the intestinal fortitude dis- 
played by Navy football teams, one of 
our leading sports authorities cozily 
commented, "They measure up to 
Perry's famous command in the Battle 
of Lake Erie, 'Don't give up the ship!" 
That would have been startling news 
tc David Foote Lawrence, dying on the 
decks of the U. S. S. Chesapeake en- 
gaging England's Shannon somewhere 
in the Atlantic Ocean. 



THE COVER 

Campus photographer Al Danegger, Maryland 
alumnus, produced the novelty cover on this 
issue. 

The young lady pictured in the upper center 
of the design is Jamie Long, A&S senior, Inter- 
national Club Vice President and Chairman, 
KAT Pledsre President, Modern Dance Club, Re- 
ligious Philosophy Club. As a junior she trans- 
ferred to Maryland from Stephens, Columbia, Mo. 

Seated at the right of the design is Janice 
Lovre, Junior in Home Ec. She was SGA class 
Secretary of the Freshman Class and is a mem- 
ber of the Home Ec Club, Tria Delt, etc. She is 
the daughter of Congressman Harold O. Lovre 
of South Dakota. 

At the left of the design is Clay Keene Ber- 
nard, a frequent campus visitor enrolled at 
Holton-Arms School, D. C. who, as a youngster 
was, for four years, mascot of Terrapin boxing 
teams, '37 to '40. In 1949 she was chosen 
"Sweetheart" of the Dixie Boxing Tournament 
at Columbia, S. C with Johnny Lujack as 
escort. In 1949 and 1950 she was a member of 
the Queen's Court, President's Cup Regatta. 



When President Calvin Coolidge an- 
nounced that he was not a candidate 
for re-election by stating, "I do not 
choose to run"; and when President 
Warren G. Harding spoke of bringing 
the country back to "normalcy" much 
space was devoted to these "unusual" 
expressions. 

"Obtunded" 

However, when United States-edu- 
cated Madame Chiang Kai-Shek, ad- 
dressing the Congress of the United 
States, made use of the words "transi- 
gent," and "obtunded" the latter pre- 
cipitated an exodus of "educated" 
American citizens toward the nearest 
available volume of Messrs. Funk and 
Wagnalls' well-known but none too well- 
thumbed volume. That wasn't a bad 
move at that, and, as suggested by Dr. 
Byrd, should be resorted to more often. 

The Madame Chiang Kai-Shek inci- 
dent provides a classic example in sup- 
port of Dr. Byrd's contentions. While 
the former Mayling Soong was edu- 
cated in American colleges it is signifi- 
cant that she majored in English, the 
text books for which study were more 
readily available to any one of millions 
of Americans than they were to the 
young student from the Far East. 
Clever, these Chinese ! 

Dr. Byrd is so right! 



MARINES SEEK GRADS 

The Marine Corps has announced im- 
mediate openings for 1,000 college 
graduates in its greatly expanded offi- 
cer training program. 

College graduates 20 to 27 years of 
age are sought to meet the increased 
requirements for junior officers caused 
by expansion of the Marine Corps, to- 
gether with the release of Reservists 
to civilian life. 

Selected applicants will receive 10 
weeks of intensive training as officer 
candidates at Quantico, Virginia. Those 
successfully completing the course will 
be commissioned second lieutenants 
and will then receive an additional five 
months of specialized military schoo- 
ling. 

College graduates should contact the 
local Marine Corps recruiting office or 
write Marine Corps Headquarters at 
Washington 25, D.C., for application 
forms. 



LIBRARY CHANGE 

During the summer, several changes 
were made in the organization of the 
University Library. 

The Periodical department, which was 
formerly located in the second floor 
reading room, has been moved down- 
stairs to the former reserve room. 

The Library annex now houses the 
reserve books. 

Behind the scenes new bookshelves 
have been added in the stacks, and the 
former periodical stacks behind the 
main desk have been removed to afford 
more office space for staff members. 

The seminar room in the Annex has 
been removed and changed into a hall- 
way to the reserve reading room. 



[4] 



FILL REGISTRATION 



SEPTEMBER 
1951 




»ESPITE the countrywide decline 
in enrollment, the University of 
Maryland's registration figures for the 
current semester show only a very 
slight decrease, according to Registrar 
Alma H. Preinkert. 

Total enrollment, excluding the Euro- 
pean Program, stands 
at 11,573, with 8,640 
registered at the Col- 
lege Park schools 
and 2,933 registered 
in Baltimore. The 
decrease below last 
year's figure of 12,- 
043 amounts to 47r. 
The ratio of men to 
women stands at 3 
to 1. 

The College of 

Registrar Preinkert Artg and Scie nces 

leads the College Park schools with 
J, 899 students registered for the cur- 
rent semester. The enrollment in the 
other colleges stands at: Special and 
Continuation Studies, 1,695; Business 
and Public Administration, 1,258; 
Graduate School, 1,251; Engineering, 
817; Education, 611; Agriculture 486; 
Home Economics, 327; Physical Educa- 
tion 222; Military Science 74. 

Reductions in student enrollment 
generally, are attributed to expiration 
of World War II ex-GI educational 
benefits and current demands of selec- 
tive service with resultant future un- 
certainties. 

Percentage of Fair Sex 

The ratio of men to women at the 
University of Maryland has decreased 
slightly this year, according to Miss 
Preinkert. 

There are three men to every woman 
on the College Park campus, the 75-25 
ratio showing fewer boys per girl than 
last year's 79-21 figure. 

Of the 8640 students enrolled at 
College Park, 6480 are men and 2160 
are women. Figures for the first semes- 
ter of last year show 8867 men to 2328 
women. 

Of the 7380 undergraduates enrolled 
in the College Park schools, 6079 live 
on campus, either in dormitories, pri- 
vate rooms, or in fraternity or sorority 
houses. 

Figures for the five Baltimore schools 
are not yet available. 

Welcomed by President 

The new students were welcomed to 
the University by President H C. Byrd, 
in a special orientation program held 
in the Coliseum. Dr. Byrd advised the 
newcomers of their responsibilities as 
member of the student body, and spoke 
of V ., many services rendered by the 
University throughout the state. 

Problems, procedures and other in- 
formation relating to the new students 
were discussed in a talk by Lyle V. 
Mayer, speech instructor at the Uni- 
versity. Other members of the faculty 
and administration who were introduced 
included Dr. Harold F. Cotterman, Dean 
of the Faculty; Miss Adele Stamp, 




Governor McKeldin 



Dean of Women; Miss Alma Preinkert, 
Registrar; and Mr. Frank Wright, 
President of the Student Government. 
Orientation activities were under the 
chairmanship of Joe Batz, President of 
the Sophomore Class. 

Movies and a meeting of the Student 
Government Association, band concerts, 
singing, and a terrace dance were part 
of the program, as well as Dean of Men 
and Women's parties, tours of Wash- 
ington, intersquad football game, and 
a barn dance. 

Church services were held on Sunday 
and an Interfaith reception also took 
place. 

Governor Speaks 
As a climax to Maryland's fall regis- 
tration, the Honorable Theodore R. 
McKeldin, Governor of Maryland, ad- 
dressed students at a reception in the 
Armory, sponsored by the campus re- 
ligious groups. Governor McKeldin 
spoke on "Religion in the Life of the 
College Freshman." 
m^B^^ME^HH The Governor, an 
Episcopal layman, 
spoke about "Relig- 
ion in the Life of 
the College Fresh- 
man." His text was 
a favorite Biblical 
passage of the late 
President Franklin 
D. Roosevelt — the 
thirteenth chapter of 
First Corinthians. 

Highlights of the 
speech were the uses 
of Love as the basis of membership in 
the Kingdom of God, expressed by what 
Governor McKeldin considers as the 
"six greatest words." 

"Know thyself" were words which 
Socrates of ancient Greece expressed. 
The governor explained the need for 
humility in God's way, as man is made 
as God wished him to be. Culture and 
education, gained by studying helps 
man to know himself, he said. 

Character is shown in the words of 
Marcus Aurillius of ancient Rome, 
"Control thyself." Character building 
is important, Governor McKeldin as- 
serted, as in the case of Horace Gree- 
ley, who said: "After death one thing- 
remains and that is character." 
Quotes The Master 
Governor McKeldin used the words 
of Jesus of Nazareth, "Give thyself," 
as the last of ways man can use Love 
in the Kingdom of God. The speaker 
said man must walk with God; how- 
ever, he must have culture and charac- 
ter in order to give himself to God. 

Prior to Governor McKeldin's ad- 
dress, the Reverend Mr. Nathaniel C. 
Acton gave the Invocation, followed by 
the welcoming address by Diane Varne, 
President of the Student Religious 
Council. 

University President Dr. Harry C. 
Byrd, in introducing McKeldin, as- 
serted to the assemblage, "The de- 
velopment of the spiritual side of life 
as well as the physical side is of great 
importance to the student." 




Dean Epple 



Dean SI .tin i> 



Dean of Men Geary Eppley and Dean of 
Women Adele Stamp lauded the Til Orientation 
Program as the best in Maryland's history. 



Diane Varne, President of the Student 
Religious Council, delivered an address 
of welcome. Chaplains and officers of 
the various religious groups were intro- 
duced. The Rev. Nathaniel C. Acton of 
Saint Andrew's Episcopal Church of- 
fered the Benediction, with the Invoca- 
tion given by Rabbi Meyer Greenberg. 

Incoming students were given an op- 
portunity to become better acquainted 
with one another at a special frosh 
mixer dance held in the Coliseum. 

To provide housing accommodations 
for the women a temporary building on 
the campus, formerly used as a dormi- 
tory and then as a nursery and labora- 
tory, is being re-converted to living 
quarters. 

Dean of Women Adele Stamp stated 
that from an overall standpoint the 
handling of the freshmen students 
through their orientation program has 
been "excellent" and "the best in the 
school's history. And Dean of Men 
Geary Eppley commended the orienta- 
tion committee and declared: "This is 
the finest and most expansive orienta- 
tion program in the school's history." 



FALL CONVOCATION 

Fall Convocation at the University of 
Maryland took place in the University 
Coliseum on Thursday, October 18th. 

Following precedent established last 
year, Dr. H. C. Byrd, President of the 
University, delivered the convocation 
address. In past years it was the cus- 
tom to invite a guest speaker. How- 
ever, the various deans felt that fall 
convocation was an ideal occasion on 
which to hear the President's report 
on "the state of the University." 

Dean of Men Geary Eppley was ap- 
pointed by Dean J. Freeman Pyle, chair- 
man of the Public Functions Commit- 
tee, to act as general coordinator of 
the program. 

Dr. Allan G. Gruchy was again grand 
marshall. The program was in charge 
of Registrar Alma H. Preinkert and 
Professor of Music Harlan Randall. 
The latter arranged for incidental musi- 
cal numbers. 

• •••••••••••• 
DISRAELI:— 

"The rights and liberties of a nation 
ecu only be preserved by institutions;. 
It is not the spread of knowledge or the 
i, Kirch of intellect that will be found 
sufficient sureties for the public wel- 
fare in the crisis of a country's free- 
dom." 



[5] 




THIS IS THE BULL 

Dinu mends his fences. 



A TRIBUTE TO MARYLAND'S 
EASTERN SHORE FOLK 

American Legion Calls Attention To The Helpful Kindness 
And Gracious Hospitality Extended To Anti -Communist 

Refugees in an Article 



By Dinu Aliman, as told to Leland Stotve 

In the American Legion Magazine 



w 



'HEN we came from 
Europe in June 1948, 
Bobby was six and soon after 
Danny was born. Ileana and 
I were happiest because he was 
born here. We said: 
"Already we've got one 
American in our fam- 
ily." I told Ileana, to 
become Americans fast 
we ought to live and work only with 
Americans. So I was looking around, 
asking where to start. 

One day a friend in Washington said: 
"Dinu, you better go over in Maryland 
or. the Eastern Shore. Those people are 
kind of old-fashioned. Everybody takes 




care of his business, and of everybody 
else's business too. But if you want to 
know how friendly Americans can be, 
go to the Eastern Shore." 

A Romanian friend said he'd buy a 
small farm, if we would work it. Of 
course we didn't know anything about 
farming. After I studied law at home 
I was a factory manager and secretary 
to a bank. We had never worked with 
our hands. Ileana's family was well-off, 
too. We could only take with us some 
of her jewelry; and the money from 
that was nearly used up with Danny 
coming. Then I learned a fantastic 
thing — how a man can start in America 
without having any money. 




Photo by Angela Calomiris 

EASTERN SHORE HOSPITALITY 

The oil burner man asked Mr. and Mrs. Aliman to dinner. To Dinu's amazement there were 
even candles on the table. Here the Alimans face the camera; Bliss Ryan, their host, is at right: 
hig wife is opposite him. and a neighbor, Johnny Evans, completes the party. 



We went to Sudlersville on the East- 
ern Shore. Right away I met Uncle 
Wilbur, a real estate man. This 
L'ncle Wilbur was also the railroad 
agent, the Western Union man, the 
notary public. He had his pants hang- 
ing down over his belly, and a steady 
cold. He always carried Kleenex in 
one pocket for his cold, and candy for 
the kids in the other pocket. He was 
always helping everybody. I just told 
Uncle Wilbur the truth about us. He 
found a place for the lowest price, and 
was always coming by to see how I 
was doing. He was proud when he 
heard people were happy about us. ■ 
Needed Transportation 

We needed a car, but by then we 
didn't have any money left. An Ameri- 
can friend loaned me $250 and told me 
to go to the local bank. I told the 
manager about myself and explained 
why I must get a car. He was one of 
those typical bankers who never smile. 
Nothing doing, I thought. But he said: 
"Yes. We'll lend you $250." Just be- 
cause I was a foreigner he gave it to 
me. "Please don't mention this to any- 
body," he said. They never did this 
kind of business. So without money 
we had a farm and a car. Another 
American I had known in Romania 
gave us some furniture. Mr. Hucke, 
the auctioneer, sent us two beds, a 
kitchen table and dishes. Without any 
money we had almost a furnished 
house. That's what I mean about what 
is most fantastic about America. 
Dud Was Boss 

Then I met the owner of the grain 
elevator when I went to get food for 
the cows. Dudley Roe was the boss for 
everything; the elevator, the bank, the 
movies. I was thinking to see a very 
severe guy behind a desk, like we ex- 
pect in Europe. I found him working 
hard, loading bags on the elevator band. 
I said: "My name is Dinu." He said: 
"Oh. You're the new fellow coming in 
our community. I'm glad to welcome 
you. Looking in your face I'm sure 
we'll be proud of you." From the first 
day he called me "my friend." I was 
very surprised, the way this important 
man was receiving me. But the grocer 
— everybody was receiving us like that. 

Until we came to America Ileana had 
never cooked in her life. She was 
brought up with plenty of servants. 
But now poor Ileana was cooking, look- 



[6] 



ing after Bobby and the baby; washing, 
honing and scrubbing floors — from 
early morning to ten or eleve at night. 
She got very thin, and I lost thirty 
pounds — but for me, it was good. We 
never worked so hard, but it was a 
wonderful life. We had peeling wall 
paper. The oil stove smoked because 
we didn't know how to use it. But we 
had our own home again at last. I loved 
working on the farm; the feeling of 
being independent. 

Considerate Treatment 

When the oil burner went bad a man 
came. I told him I learned in a maga- 
zine what we needed. "Look here, my 
friend," he said. "You can't afford a 
$2,500 job. I can fix this up for $400." 
That shocked me — that he was saving 
me so much money and losing himself 
a big business. But later on this man, 
Jimmy, shocked me even more. "How 
about coming for dinner tomorrow 
night?" he asked. That night, when we 
met, he shocked me again. He was very 
well dressed — had a lovely wife, a nice 
house with a television set — and we had 
dinner by candles! I thought: an Ameri- 
can worker lives like this! Because he 
worked in old clothes I expected he 
couldn't live very well. But it turned 
out he was the owner of the oil com- 
pany, the mayor of Galina and fire 
chief. 

Pete Told Him Off 

The only fellow who wasn't friendly 
lived right next door. Pete was always 
saying what kind of a farmer I am; I 
don't know how to do this or that. Once 
he proposed I should take his milk to 
the cooler one week, and he would take 
mine the next. When I called for his 
milk I discovered he has eighteen cans, 
and I only had three. I was ashamed to 
admit I'd been fooled. I took his cans 
every other week. We didn't want any 
trouble. 

Pete owned a big Holstein bull that 
was smashing down our fences every 
day. I had to repair them all the time. 
I complained to Pete many times. He 
was laughing up his sleeve and saying: 
"Don't tell me you're afraid of my bull, 
Dinu. He gives you lots of practice in 
repairing fences." At last I got mad 




Photo by Angela Calomiris 

A FRIEND IN NEED 

Dudley Roe, left, was "boss for everything," but he too 
worked hard and went out of his way to help out Dinu. 



Photo by Angela Calomiris 

EXPENSIVE LESSON 

They learned about chicken- 
raising, the hard, expensive way. 



as hell. "Keep your damned bull locked 
up or I'll butcher it," I told him. After 
that Pete kept his bull in its pen. Then 
someone asked if I would pasture his 
bull with our cows. I was happy to 
have a bull. Pete would have to keep 
his locked up. But when Sam brought 
the bull I could hardly speak. You never 
saw such a scrawny, miserable little 
bull. Pete said, "Well, Dinu, I see 
you've got a bull to defend your fence. 
Now I can leave mine outside." I didn't 
want to show him my disappointment. 
So I said all right. 

Next day was Sunday, and we were 



away all day. When we got home I saw 
the fences all torn down like a hurri- 
cane. Blood on the ground, too. I ran 
around the house looking for our poor 
dead bull. There he was — that skinny, 
sawed-off-son-of-a-gun! Just chewing 
grass . . . calm like an old judge . . . 
not a scratch on him. But the minute 
we turned our lights on Pete came in. 
"Your bull nearly killed my bull!" he 
yelled. "You should see his legs and 
the gashes in his stomach. I had to 
get the vet to sew him up. You gotta 
pay for this!" 

(Continued on Page 50) 




g 






The Eastern Shore has many winding estuaries like this one providing 
anchorages and a fine place for homes. 



SCENES FROM THE HISTORIC EASTERN SHORE 

Fishing for marlin off Maryland's coast is loved by deep sea sports- 



[7] 




it MARYLAND 11.11. IT 97 



MARYLAND, 1880 

Dr. John O. Sturgeon, Sr., Uniontown, Penn- 
sylvania, recently celebrated the 97th anni- 
versary of his birth. He graduated from Mary- 
land (Med.) in 1880. His son is a practicing 
physician, the fourth generation of a great fam- 
ily of men of medicine. 



ALUMNUS "MONK" MIER, '43, 
Uniontown, Pennsylvania, recent- 
ly called attention to John D. Sturgeon, 
Sr., M.D., who, celebrating his 97th 
birthday anniversary, could easily be 
Maryland's oldest graduate. 

Dr. Sturgeon, born in 1854, graduated 
from the School of Medicine in 1880. 

On the venerable doctor's 97th birth- 
day, Homer Jordan of the Uniontown 
Evening Standard, wrote : 

"We just talked to a 97-year-old boy! 

"Of course, the records show Dr. 
John D. Sturgeon, Sr., to be 97. But 
his boyish enthusiasm for his profes- 
sion, the alertness of his mind, the 
ready smile and the firmness of his 
handshake all give the lie to the rec- 
ords. 

"It required a definite wrench of the 
mind to realize the eager voice we 
heard talking about television came 
from a man whose career has actually 
spanned the years from candlelight to 
video. 

Rank Understatement 

"Many a reporter in writing about an 
elderly man has said, 'he enjoyed a full 
life,' but such a phrase about Dr. Stur- 
geon, Sr., could be considered only a 
rank understatement. 

"Indeed his was a life that was 
packed with activity and service. Yes, 
service that often required riding a 
horse in fetlock-deep mud over moun- 
tain trails, later changing to a horse 
and buggy and finally to automobiles. 

Many Successes 

"His also was a life crammed with 
success and some heartbreaks. His sad- 
dest moments came early in his career 
after he joined his father, Dr. William 
S Sturgeon in 1880. 

"They were sad days because he had 
to see, as did his father, countless 
babies die of diphtheria because there 
was no specific remedy. Anxiously the 



John D. Sturgeon, (Md. Med., 
1880), Born in 1854, Tells of 
Early Experiences in Medi- 
cal Practice. Uniontown 
Honors Third of Four Gene- 
rations of M. D.'s. 



young doctor read of and tried one 
remedy after another but still the 
babies died. 

"Finally he read of a new treatment 
— diphtheria antitoxin — and he resolved 
to try it. Perhaps some other doctors 
might have laughed as he hurried to 
give it to a child, or as he rushed on 
to use the remainder of the precious 
bottle of antitoxin on an adult. 

"But the next day they would have 
praised him as the fever dropped in 
both patients and they started on the 
road to recovery. 

Awards and Testimonials 

"His home is filled with awards and 
testimonials because of other successes. 
But beside the successful use of dipth- 
theria antitoxin, Dr. Sturgeon will best 
be remembered because he once said to 
Editor John Ritenour of The Uniontown 
Genius that Uniontown should have 
a hospital. His remark started a news- 
paper campaign that resulted in the 
building of the Uniontown hospital. 

"His memory is still razor sharp and 
he loves to talk of the development of 
the clinical thermometer, the x-ray, 
penicillin and other drugs, of the dis- 
covery that what had been considered 
a generally fatal bowel obstruction was 
actually nothing but appendicitis. 

"He is still an avid reader of medi- 
cal publications though he no longer 
treats any patients and performed his 
last surgery some 10 years ago. 

"In fact reading and television now 
take up the major portion of his time 
though he doesn't like the "fake" wrest- 
ling matches. He also enjoys, however, 
sitting with his son, Dr. John Sturgeon, 
Jr., well known pediatrician, and talk- 
ing over cases. 

Generation Upon Generation 

"Medicine is in his blood and rightly 
so, for in addition to his father and his 
son,, his grandfather, Daniel Sturgeon, 
was a doctor while his granddaughter, 
Mrs. Marion Sturgeon Hartman, is a 
nurse in Jefferson hospital, Philadel- 
phia. 

"Yes, Uniontown, Philadelphia and 
the medical profession will long honor 
the Sturgeon family — particularly Dr. 
John D. Sturgeon, Sr., a 97-year-old 
bey." 

Also paying high tribute to Union- 
town's grand old man of medicine, the 
Fayette County Mirror printed: 

"The lovable Dr. Sturgeon celebrated 
his 97th birthday. The venerable doc- 
tor belongs to the history of Fayette 
County, and it would be rather im- 
possible to detail his long years of 



service and devotion to the citizens of 
Fayette County. On April 20, 1949, a 
plaque was presented to Dr. Sturgeon 
on behalf of Uniontown Hospital, in 
appreciation for his splendid contribu- 
tion. 

A Pleasant Duty 

"At that time, Dr. W. A. McHugh, 
Jr., on behalf of the Staff, stated, 

This is one of the most pleasant 
duties I have ever been asked to per- 
form. Our calling, by common consent 
as noble as any, dignifies all who join 
Us ranks. The honor of the profession 
is the cumulative honor of all who both 
in days gone by and in our own time 
have worthily and honestly labored in 
it. In every generation there are a 
chosen happy few, who shed special 
lustre upon it by their character, their 
attainments, or the great glory of their 
service to their fellow men; for it is 
as Ambrose Pare said, "Beautiful and 
best of all things is to work for the 
relief and cure of suffering." In our 
generation, Dr. John Dawson Sturgeon, 
Sr., is one who by his full devotion, his 
complete surrender to its ideals, and 
by his loyal, earnest and unceasing 
work added distinction to our profes- 
sion, which in return now showers upon 
him the rewards with which no others 
can compare, the approbation of his 
fellow workers and the friendship and 
trust of the best among his contempo- 
raries. "The mightier the man, the 
mightier is the thing that makes him 
honored. 

"It is indeed a privilege a>id pleasure 
to present this plaque to you, Dr. Stur- 
geon, and it is with added pride that I 
am permitted to do son in the presence 
of your son and your friends." 

"In April, 1949, while attending ex- 
ercises at Uniontown Hospital in con- 
nection with Hospital Day, there, Dr. 
Sturgeon, Sr., was interviewed by Ruth 
Love of the Morning Herald, and her 
article is reprinted here: 

Honored as the "father" of the 
Uniontown Hospital and recognized as 
probably the oldest practicing physi- 
cian in the United States, 94-year-old 
Dr. John Dawson Sturgeon, Sr. — he'll 
be 95 July 12 — reminisced last night in 
his modest office. 

Since 1880 

The hours before retiring afforded 
reflection on the Intern Reunion yes- 
terday at the hospital when his con- 
temporaries, old and young, turned the 
spotlight on the man who has been 
quietly serving the sick and ailing of 
tltis community si>icc 1880 when he 
hung up his shingle after graduating 
from the College of Physicians and Sur- 
geons, Baltimore, Baltimore, Md., now 
the University of Maryland. 

"It was all so wonderful," said Dr. 
Sturgeon, rocking back and forth, his 
hands making steeples as he talked. 
"My, my, it is wonderful — this hos- 
pital which is one of the finest to be 
found in any city of comparable size in 
the country." 



[8] 



"Why do they say you are the father 
of the Uniontown hospital?" the re- 
porter asked. 

Origin of Hospital 

"Well, my dear," he said kindly, "it 
goes back a good many years. I picked 
vp a newspaper one day and read where 
they were opening a hospital in Mor- 
gantown, W. Va. And I thought of how 
much good one could do here. So I put 
ov my hat and hurried up to the office 
of the old Genius and talked with my 
good friend, John B. Ritenour. He said 
he'd send out reporters to sound public 
sentiment. First thing I knew, people 
were stopping me and inquiring about 
it. That was in 1902. The next year 
we had a hospital. I guess that's why 
they call me the father of it." 
Back Through the Years 

Only a little more than five years to 
go before he reaches the century mark, 
Dr. Sturgeon's thoughts turned inward 
to trek back through the years — stop- 
ping here and there at milestones which 
occupy a prominent place in a re- 
markably agile mind. 

"The doctors — the young ones — send 
their patients to the hospital and there, 
with the latest in medicines and the 
most up-to-date equipment, they work 
what, many times, are miracles," he 
reminisced. 

The reporter sat quietly, listening to 
the memories which began to find their 
way into words. 

"When I hung out my shingle there 
was no hospital, there were no tele- 
phones, there was no fast transporta- 
tion. A doctor tended to everything 
from measles to amputations, front 
mumps to operations. But he wasn't a 
specialist. He was just the family doc- 
tor — privileged to walk in, reach for 
a cup and pour himself some coffee 
from the family coffee pot, listen to 
all the grievances and complaints from 
marital fights to politics, take the pulse, 
prescribe the medicine, pat the young- 
sters on the head — and then ride a 
horse through all kinds of weather to 
another home, another patient, more 
talk, more coffee. 

"Just think, today, an expectant 
mother, when the time is near, calls 
her doctor, gets in an automobile and 
rides quickly to the hospital where 
everything is in readiness for the 
Blessed Event. 

In the Olden Days 

"Back in those days, some member 
of the family, mostly the husband, 
drove his horse at a fast clip to my 
home and told me to hurry. I would 
saddle up, tie my satchel — the little 
black bag — through the stirrup and 
hang it over the saddle, and climb 
aboard. The rain, the sleet, the mud, 
the snow, the ice — a doctor had to take 
them and so did the horse. 

"Arrived at the house, I would find 
the yieighbors rushing about, poking 
the coal stove, filling pails so I would 
have hot water. Hours would go by. 
And then would come the baby. It was 
as exhausting for the doctor as for the 
mother. Times certainly have changed. 

Compares "Fees" 

"/ remember when President Mc- 
Kinley was shot. I was called out 



to Beeson Works for the name kind of 
a case. I had only Dr. Charlie Smith 
to help me. We did what we could a ml 
sewed the man up. He lived for years. 
Do you know, I never did get paid for 
that case — but the doctor who took 
care of President McKinlcy got a $10,- 
000 fee. Back in those days, getting a 
fee was more remarkable than not get- 
ting one — because doctors were kind of 
resigned to not getting one more often 
than getting paid. 

"We didn't have anesthetists in 
those days, either. One doctor would 
serve for another. The first regular 
anesthetist we hud was Dr. Charlie 
Bierer. We thought that was real 
]>rogress. 

Coroner for $300 

"I talked to young Dr. ( W. Ralston ) 
McGee today. He's county coroner now. 
Do you know that the same year I 
began practicing here — 1880 — they also 
made me the county coroner. I got $300 
a year then and he gets $2,200 now. 
That's the difference 48 years can 
make. 

"The first case to be admitted to the 
Uniontown Hospital back there in 1903 
xvas a burn case — a child who had been 
badly burned. And the doctors who had 
charge of it were Dr. Thomas Eastman 
and Dr. H. S. Hackney. They're both 
dead now. 

"Do you know," he said with pride, 
'There has been a Doctor Sturgeon in 
this city since 1812. My grandfather- 
began practicing here then. My father 
followed him, I followed my father and 
young Dr. John, my son, follows me. 

Justifies Merit 

"Time makes great changes in every- 
thing. But nowhere is there greater 
need for expansion and development 
than in the service to humanity. I 
am proud of my profession. I am proud 
of Uniontown Hospital. I am proud of 
the men who serve my profession in 
this hospital. And because it is such 
a fine hospital, giving such service 
beyond what other cities of this size 
afford, Uniontown Hospital merits and 
justifies the confidence and support of 
the citizens of Uniontown and its en- 
virons." 

"Dr. Sturgeon gazed at the plaque 
presented him yesterday by Dr. Wil- 
liam McHugh in behalf of the Union- 
town Hospital staff: 

"Pm so proud of that," he said, his 
eyes lighting. 

And the plaque stands next to an- 
other prized possession — the personally 
autographed picture of an old friend, 
General George C. Marshall, retired 
war-time chief of staff and a Union- 
town man who served in another great 
calling. 

• **•••••••••• 

GEORGE WASHINGTON:— 

"I know of no pursuit in which more 
real and important services can be 
rendered to any country than by im- 
proving its agriculture, its breed of 
useful animals, and other branches of 
a husbandman's cares." 



LIFE 



AT BYRD STADI1 M 
A LA DIXIE 



AS THESE pages go to press wo 
understand Life Magazine will 
print an article including reference to 
registration day and events centered at 
Byrd Stadium, featuring Confederate 
flags and caps. 

This idea, like Topsy in Uncle Tom's 
Cabin, "jist growed" in the mind of 
the feature director Life sent to College 
Park. The University had invited Life's 
crew down for pictures. The Dixie 
flags and caps are for sale at the Uni- 
versity Shop in College Park. The Life 
man borrowed them for distribution at 
Byrd Stadium. 

Since the waving of the miniature 
replica of "Marse" Lee's battle stan- 
dards by Southern schools has already 
come in for press criticism in the No'th, 
including the occasion of the invasion 
of Boston and East Lansing by Mary- 
land's victorious football team, censure 
of Life's Maryland feature may be 
anticipated. 

In level-headed quarters the carrying 
of flags representing long since de- 
parted Americans who gallantly fought 
an heroic and lost cause, is regarded 
as one of youths' passing fads, akin to 
the fox tails that used to whip from 
auto radio antennae. Certainly the 
economics faculty at College Park is 
not advising students to hang on to 
the currency featuring President Jeff 
Davis' picture although, at that, it 
might go further than some of the 
dollar bills around and about these 
days. 

Anyhow, as long ago as the introduc- 
tion of the unrivalled short stories by 
O. Henry, it has been noted that the 
"professional Southerners" who yell the 
loudest and stand at attention when 
Yankee-penned "Dixie" is played, are 
largely from South Boston or South 
Milwaukee. 

Possibly the representation in Life 
will convince some of our sister institu- 
tions, located farther south in Southern 
Conference territory, that Maryland is 
a Southern school, "sho 'nuf" and "fo' 
danged sho." Our athletic teams have 
long since learned that when they com- 
pete up North they are "Rebels" and 
when they play down South they are 
"Yankees." 

Maryland-minded folk will also ap- 
preciate that the Life article is indica- 
tive of the fact that our Alma Mater 
has, under Dr. Byrd's nationally ac- 
claimed leadership, reached a level at 
which Life and others need little urg- 
ing toward featuring the University in 
a manner for which many a school 
would figuratively give its right arm 
up to its left arm pit. 

Then too, one may safely wager all 
the cotton in Dixie that any Maryland 
gal pictured waving the Stars and Bars 
for dear Life will leave the magazine's 
readers with the impression that our 
terpettes left Ziegfield's Follies in dis- 
gust because the competition there was 
insufficiently attractive. 



[9] 




NEARING COMPLETION 



Al Danegger Foto 



Progress, as of 8 October 1951, on the Interdenominational Chapel is reflected in this photograph. 
Numerous couples have expressed the hope of being the first to be married in this fine new House of 
God. Weddings, however, will not take place until the completion of the structure. 

SEW CHSTIUCTIII 

College Park Campus Shows Skyline Changes 



The Chapel 

C CONSTRUCTION work on the Uni- 
j versity Chapel is just about com- 
pleted. 

Work on the million-dollar edifice 
had been delayed by bad weather, ma- 
terial shortages, and other factors, in- 
cluding a three-week plasterers' strike. 
The date of completion is almost a year 
behind schedule. 

The building consists of a main 
chapel with a seating capacity of 1000 
people, and a smaller chapel in the 
rear which will seat 100. Also in the 
structure are located offices for the 
clerics representing all denominations. 
The chapel is interdenominational and 
services for all faiths will be conducted 
within it. 

Dr. Byrd's Opinion 

It is hoped that the chapel, a con- 
venience formerly lacking at Maryland, 
will stimulate the interest of more 
students in religious activities than in 
the past. All religious clubs are an- 
ticipating an increase in membership 
and attendance at services. 

Emphasizing the value of religion in 
daily life Dr. H. C. Byrd, University 
President, said recently, "Only by ac- 
cepting the basic principles of religion 
can we preserve the finest values that 
we have. 

"Faith in God is basic to real satis- 
faction," Dr. Byrd continued, "and in 
order that this faith mav be observed 



and its values emphasized, I hope that 
every person on the campus of the 
University, or connected with the Uni- 
versity, will patronize the chapel regu- 
larly. 

"Personally," Dr. Byrd said, "I be- 
lieve that God's spiritual values are 
basic to success in life and to the 
achievement of any worthwhile pro- 
gram. 

"In such times as these," Dr. Byrd 
concluded, "if men and women would 
only turn to the Source of all real 



strength, there would be more bright- 
ness, and we should have less fear." 

The new chapel, consti - ucted in colo- 
nial brick, will have a four column por- 
tico over the entrance, giving the chapel 
an appearance similar to the other 
buildings on campus. Henry Powell 
Hopkins, the designer, traveled ex- 
tensively throughout the United States 
for a year collecting ideas for the 
chapel. 

The building is topped by a 165-foot 
steeple containing four clocks. Over- 
looking College Park and the boule- 
vard, the structure is visible more than 
a mile away. 

Services will be accompanied by 
music played on a special three-manual 
pipe organ, built to the designer's speci- 
fications. 

New Chemistry Building 

Chemistry students now attend class- 
es in the new building located in the 
Glenn L. Martin Institute of Technol- 
ogy area. 

A section of the building houses lab- 
oratories for radio-chemical experi- 
ments and is separated from the rest 
cf the building by a buffer area pre- 
venting passage of radioactive waves. 
Experimenters in this section are re- 
quired to shower before leaving the 
area. All clothing worn during experi- 
ments is laundered there. 

Ten laboratories, accommodating 24 
students each, are distributed over the 
first three floors. 

Five stories high, the T-shaped struc- 
ture is 290 feet in length and 136 feet 
wide. 

The first floor accommodates the 
State Feed and Fertilizer Inspection 
laboratories, as well as a reading room 
with a capacity of 60 persons. 

A Spectography lab, an x-ray room, 
and two small rooms equipped for micro- 
film reading are contained in the base- 
ment. 

Physics Building 

In front of the Chemistry building 
is the new Physics building, which is 
due for completion next year. 

At present, all reinforcing of walls 




The New Chemical Engineering Building 
shown here as of 8 October 1951. 



Al Danegger Foto 

NEARLY COMPLETE 

part of the Glenn L. Martin Engineering Center, is 



no] 



and floors has been completed, and the 
concrete for the third floor will be 
poured next week. Brickwork for the 
three-story edifice has already begun. 
When the building, which is T-shaped, 
is completed at a cost of over a million 
dollars, it will house all physics equip- 
ment and facilities now contained in 
the Botany and Physics building as 
well as the Institute of Fluid Dynamics, 
and labs for jet, x-ray, high voltage, 
and spectroscopy studies. 

Swimming Pool 

For the first time, the swimming pool 
in the Women's Field House is in full 
operation. 

The pool is open to coeds only, be- 
cause of lack of locker space and other 
facilities for male students. 

The swimway is 57 feet long and 36 
feet wide, with a depth of three feet, 
six inches at the shallow end, and ten 
feet at the deepest point. Two diving 
boards are located at the deep end and 
a seven and one-half foot walkway sur- 
rounds the pool. 

The main floor includes six offices for 
instructors and the second floor houses 
an exercise room and a photo labora- 
tory. 

Byrd Stadium 

The extensions to handsome new 
Byrd Stadium are rapidly being com- 
pleted. 

Work proceeds rapidly on the quarter 
mile cinder track that encircles the 
field. Some landscaping is yet to be 
accomplished. 

Athletic Director Jim Tatum and his 
staff, Graduate Manager Bill Cobey and 
all but a few of the head coaches took 
up their quarters in the spacious and 
attractive new athletic administration 
building during the summer. Every- 
thing relating to sports is handled in 
this edifice. This, of course, includes 
tickets. 

Dressing rooms for football equip- 
ment rooms and other facilities are in 
the main building with the "M" Club 
being alloted a room in the South wing. 
Other sports squads and visiting teams 
will be housed in the two smaller build- 
ings to the left and right of the ad- 
ministration building. 

A feature is parking space. The lot, 
situated at the southwest of the stadi- 
um, will accommodate approximately 
2000 autos, and an additional 1C,000 
cars can be handled in adjacent areas. 

Actual seating capacity of the con- 
crete horseshoe, with seats made of 
redwood planking, is 34,680, but 10,000 
more can be taken care of with bleacher 
seats back of the north stands, if neces- 
sary. 

The playing field in the stadium, 
which is well underlaid with a tile 
draining system, is a picture of green, 
and the spacious practice fields to the 
east, except for a small portion, are 
well covered with sod. 

• •••••••••••• 
COMENIUS:— 

"In schools, therefore, let the stu- 
dents learn to write by writing, to talk 
by talking, to sing by singing, and to 
teason by reasoning." 




ATHLETIC HEADQUARTERS 



AI Danegger Foto 



The various offices of (he University's Athletic Department are housed in this building, a part of 
Byrd Stadium. 



GENERAL QUESADA RETIRES 

Lieutenant General Elwood R. (Pete) 
Quesada, 47-year-old former Maryland 
student, last month ended his military 
career at a ceremony at Boiling Air 
Force Base, where he started it 26 
years ago. 

There was a formal parade and re- 
view and Gen. Hoyt S. Vandenberg, 
air chief of staff, presented the retiring 
general with an Oak Leaf Cluster to 
his Distinguished Service Medal. 

The decoration was for perhaps his 
most important assignment — command 
of Joint Task Force 3, the third and 
latest group of experiments at the 
atomic proving ground at Eniwetok 
Atoll in the Marshall Islands. 

He was commissioned as a second 
lieutenant in what was then the Army 
Air Corps in 1925. 

During his colorful career, Quesada 
commanded the Tactical Air Command 
and the Ninth Fighter Command in 
Europe during World War II. He took 
part in the famous "Question Mark" 
flight — the first attempt to refuel in 
midair in the late 1920's. 

Quesada rose quickly in rank when 
war clouds began to gather. After com- 
pleting a number of highly important 
missions, he became a brigadier general 
in 1942. 

He was one of the first USAF com- 
manders to lead a tactical unit in World 
War II. Under secret orders, the young 
brigadier took the first Air Defense 
Wing to Africa early in 1943. 

There, he took over the 12th Fighter 
Command. Flying against the Luft- 
waffe, Quesada and his command 
learned their first lessons in tactical 
air fighting. 

In England, Quesada led the famous 
Ninth Fighter Command which par- 
ticipated in the invasion of Europe. The 
general himself went into the Nor- 
mandy beachhead to set up forward 
headquarters on D-Day plus 1. 

He returned to the States as Assist- 
ant Chief of Air Staff for Intelligence 
in 1945. His next assignment took him 



to Florida to head the Third Air Force, 
which soon thereafter redesignated the 
Tactical Air Command with Quesada 
as commanding general. 

Quesada served as chief of the Air 
Force Reserve expansion program and 
as head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff 
Special Planning Group before his final 
assignment. 



NO HAZING 



Fraternities at Maryland are plan- 
ning to abolish the old pledge system 
of hazing and paddling which has been 
the plight of the neophyte fraternity 
man in the past. 

Marvin Perry, president of the Inter- 
fraternity Council, revealed recently 
that campus fraternities may make 
pledges available for work projects 
which will benefit the nearby com- 
munity of College Park. If a number 
of persons are required for a com- 
munity project the City Council notifies 
the IFC, which in turn contacts the 
twenty-odd Greek societies on campus 
who may furnish the men. 

The proposed plan is similar to many 
that have been initiated on other college 
campuses throughout the country and 
are finding wide favor in the communi- 
ties being served. 

During the post-war years that the 
veteran influence was felt, the old haz- 
ing system was minimized, but with ex- 
GI's being replaced by younger men 
the trend is toward the old pledge sys- 
tem. The old system did not benefit the 
chapter or the community or the per- 
sons involved, the IFC president pointed 
out. 

Although the City Council has not 
yet voted on the proposal, Perry is con- 
fident they will accept it. The plan is 
expected to begin with the fall initi- 
ations. 

• •••••••••••• 
GEN. C. B. CATES, 

Commandant, U. S. Marine Corps: — 

"Progress stops when study ccas(x. 
Education is a lifetime proposition." 



[11] 




Burnside Bridge Bloody Lane 

HISTORIC GROUND 

Burnside Bridge, left above, was the scene of the third phase of the Battle of Antietam. where General Burnside at 9 a.m., September 17, 1862, 
ordered that the bridge be taken at all hazards. Held until 1 p.m. by Tomb's two Georgia Regiments of 1,200, the bridge was taken by the 51st Pa., 51st 
N.Y., 11th, 23rd, and 36th Ohio, the 8th, 11th, and 16th Connecticut, 2nd Md., and 21st Mass., 14,000 troops in all, they were driven back to this bridge 
at nightfall with the arrival from Harper's Ferry of Confederate re-enforcements under A. P. Hill. 

Bloody Lane, right above, was the scene of the heaviest single day's fighting in the Civil War. At Antietam Battlefield, Washington County, Md. 

Ill i; K li S T Oil \ 



Picturesque Cumberland Valley Community, Originally 
Named Elizabethtown by Owner of "Hager's Delight". 
Home of famed "Hagerstown Almanac", Originally Printed 

in German 

By Mary Isabel Downey 




DEEP in the Cumberland Valley in 
the shelter of the protective 
mountains beats a great industrial 
heart. Just north of the Potomac River, 
87 miles from Baltimore, lies Hagers- 
town, county seat of Maryland's his- 
toric Washington County. 

Situated at the crossroads of the 
Cumberland-Shenandoah Valley route, 
running north and south, and the Po- 
tomac River Valley, running east and 
west, Hagerstown has enjoyed definite 
commercial advantages and has added 
many a dramatic chapter to the pages 
of American history. 

Old Elizabethtown 

Originally called Elizabethtown, Hag- 
erstown was laid out in 1761 by Capt. 
Jonathan Hager who settled about two 
miles west of the site of the town on 
a tract known as "Hager's Delight." 
He named the newly formed little 
settlement in honor of his wife and for 



\ears it was known as "Elizabeth 
(Hager's) Town" until custom and time 
abolished the "Elizabeth" and it came 
to be called solely Hagerstown. In 
1847 the name was changed by law. 
Within 10 years after the original lay- 
ing out of the town there were over 
100 homes established on the site. 
One Remote Country 

When the earliest pioneers first 
settled in the vicinity of Hagerstown, 
there was no other part of the country 
more remote and inaccessible. The ne- 
cessities of the settler which he could 
not produce for himself called for a 
tedious journey across the mountains 
by pack horse to the nearest seacoast 
town. 

The early homes were put together 
without nails since none were available 
and notched logs had to suffice. The 
floors of the homes were smoothed only 
by the use of an ax. Salt was the 




CITY LAKE PARK 

Winter or Summer finds City Park Lake a quiet retreat for old and young. Many swans and 
ducks make its mirrored waters their permanent home. 



PRIZE STOCK 

Pictured is one of the fine Hereford bulls found 
in Washington County. 

principle article for which the settlers 
of the Valley of Antietam had to jour- 
ney coastward and a bushel of salt was 
the price of a cow and a calf in those 
days. 

This remote countryside of the early 
18th century is a far cry from the 
Washington County of today, traversed 
by turnpikes and railroads that make 
it a vibrant part of the industrial 
economy of Maryland. 

Advantageous Location 

Later, still in the early days of 
Hagerstown, it came to be a comme- 
rcial and manufacturing center of no 
small importance with saw mills, grist 
mills and woolen mills dotting the 
shores of the Conococheague and An- 
tietam, tributaries of the great Poto- 
mac. Its advantageous position along 
the early trade routes enabled citizens 
of Hagerstown to reach the thriving 
seaport towns with their agricultural 
products while the old Chesapeake and 
Ohio Canal, the Baltimore and Ohio 
Railroad, the Shenandoah Valley Rail- 
road, the Cumberland Valley, and the 
Western Maryland Railroads all helped 
to assuage the growing pains of Wash- 
ington County. 

The Valley of Antietam, or Hagers- 
town Valley, famed for its fertility and 
climate, produces the finest quality 
wheat from which superior brands of 
flour are made. Peaches and apples 
flourish in great abundance and the 
quantities of rich clover and other 

(Continued on Page 46) 



[12] 




"SURGERY CALLING 
DR. KILDARE"? 

No, it is not Kildare or, for that matter, any 
M.D. This is Dave Brigham, General Alumni 
Secretary, on a recent visit to the Baltimore 
Schools, for the purpose of taking photographs 
for the new Alumni calendar. Thus the only 
operation Dr. Brigham expects to perform in 
this get-up is one upon your pocketbook for the 
removal of the price of a calendar. 



BALTIMORE CLUB ON VIDEO 

Arrangements are being completed 
for the luncheon meeting of the Balti- 
more Club. This first meeting, to be 
held at the Stafford Hotel, promises to 
be an outstanding affair with Dr. Ken- 
neth P. Landon, Officer in Charge of 
Thai, Malay and Indo-China Affairs, 
Department of State, discussing "The 
Relation of Southeast Asia to Inter- 
national Problems." 

The dates for the rest of the year's 
activities are tentatively set as follows: 

October 31st — Luncheon — Stafford 
Hotel — 12:15 P.M. 

January 23rd, 1952 — "Surprise" 
Meeting — 6:30 P.M. 

March 12th — Spring Concert — East- 
ern High School Auditorium — 
8:00 P.M. 

May 21st — Annual Meeting & Elec- 
tion of Officers — Stafford Hotel — 
8:00 P.M. 

July — Summer Party. 

Rumors are flying thick and fast 
about the "Surprise" meeting of Janu- 
ary — will it be a football award dinner ? 
A dinner-dance ? — What's your guess ? 
In any event, hold this date open — it's 
your BIG party of the year! 

The Baltimore Club attended the 
Missouri-Maryland Homecoming Game, 
in a body, an entire section being re- 
served for this group. While "Home- 
coming" is always a gala event for all 
of us — this year's plans indicated a 
bigger and better celebration — further 
strengthening the true "Maryland" 
spirit which is so prevalent in the Bal- 
timore Club. 

One of the interesting new activities 



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of the organization this year is that 
they have been invited by Mr. DeLancy 
Provost, Vice President & Director of 
Hearst Radio, to participate in a series 
of television shows in which they will 
present the accomplishments of the 
Alumni, under the supervision of 
Arnold Wilkes, Director of Public Af- 
fairs WBAL-TV. 

The TV appearances were scheduled 
for: 

October 10th— 12:30 - 12:45 P.M.; 

November 7th— 12:30-12:45 P.M.; 

December 5th— 12:30- 12:45 P.M.; 

January 9th— 12:30 - 12:45 P.M. 

The momentum of Homecoming feel- 
ing was accellerated in the October 10th 
show which launched this series, a part 
of the Public Service Program, over 



which Anne Holland of WBAL-TV pre- 
sides. 

Club members will be interested to 
know that Beatrice Jarrett, one of the 
active members of the Baltimore Club, 
who this year is Chairman of Publicity, 
has been recommended by the Nominat- 
ing Committee to be placed on the bal- 
lot as a candidate for a position of an 
elected director of the Board of Direc- 
tors of the University of Maryland 
Agricultural Alumni Association for a 
term of three years. 

• •••••••••••• 

DEWEY:— 

"To an extent characteristic of no 
other institution, save that of the state 
itself, the school has power to modify 

the social order." 



[13] 




GOVERNOR PROCLAIMS "MARYLAND LAND WEEK" 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin (Law '25) is shown as he signed an official proclamation desig- 
nating the week of October 7-13 as "Maryland Land Week." Seated with the Governor are Edward F. 
Holter, (Agriculture, '21) of Middletown, who served as state chairman of "Maryland Land Week"; 
and Mrs. Thomas Kenney, of Edgewater, representing the State Council Homemakers' Clubs. Standing, 
from left to right, are Harry H. Rieck of Preston, member of the state executive committee for 
"Maryland Land Week"; Fred L. Bull (Agriculture, '25) of College Park, secretary-treasurer; and 
Edward M. Rider, (Arts and Sciences, '47) of College Park, publicity director. 



"MARYLAND LAND WEEK" 

The week of October 7-13 was the 
second annual observance of "Maryland 
Land Week." 

Edward F. Holter of the University's 
Board of Regents, was state chairman 
of this event, volunteer committees were 
organized in various counties and made 
plans for appropriate activities to be 
held in their respective areas. In addi- 
tion, a committee was formed to en- 
courage special activities in Baltimore. 

Most of these activities were con- 
ducted through "ready made" audi- 
ences, i.e., schools, churches, and civic 
organizations, as well as other groups 
which meet regularly. They were en- 
couraged to devote at least one of their 
meetings to a subject in keeping with 
Land Week. In some counties, tours 
and demonstrations were held to illus- 
trate the advantages of conservation. 
Exhibits in libraries, store windows, 
and bank lobbies helped to remind citi- 
zens, both rural as well as urban, of 
their dependence upon the soil. 

The purpose of this statewide ob- 
servance was to "create public interest, 
understanding, and support for the 
fundamental development of a sound 
agriculture, based on practical con- 
servation of the soil and other natural 
resources." The following theme was 
selected for 1951 : 

"Land productivity is a good defense 
against inflation." 

"Maryland Land Week" was pro- 
moted for the second consecutive year 
by a state advisory committee which in- 



cluded representatives of agencies and 
organizations in the fields of agricul- 
ture, homemaking, conservation, and 
education. Officers of the committee, in 
addition to Chairman Holter, were: 
Mrs. Abram S. Pearce, Glyndon, Vice 
Chairman; Fred L. Bull, College Park, 
Secretary-Treasurer; Edward M. Rider, 
College Park, Publicity Director. 

Members of the Executive Commit- 
tee, in addition to Mr. Holter, were 
Harry H. Rieck, Preston; Joseph F. 
Kaylor, Annapolis; C. E. Wise, Jr., 
Baltimore, and Philip R. Winebrener, 
Baltimore. 



Governor's Proclamation 

"Whereas, the present international 
situation and the rapid growth of popu- 
lation in these United States necessi- 
tate the increased production of food 
and fiber, and 

"Whereas, in order to meet these re- 
quirements at home and abroad, all of 
our resources — land, labor, and capital 
— must be used as efficiently as possible, 
and 

"Whereas, all citizens of the Free 
State, both rural and urban, should be 
acquainted with the necessity for con- 
serving and increasing the basic pro- 
ductivity of our soils which are essen- 
tial to their health and welfare, as well 
as to the national economy, and 

"Whereas, wider application of sci- 
entific farming methods would help 
greatly to increase and maintain the 
productivity of our agricultural land, 
and 



"Whereas, the week of October 7-13, 
1951 has been selected by certain or- 
ganizations in the state for the purpose 
of increasing public interest in the land 
and encouraging the use of conserva- 
tion farming methods, 

"now, therefore, i, theodore r. 
McKeldin, Governor of the State of 
Maryland, do hereby proclaim the 
week of October 7-13, 1951, as "Mary- 
land Land Week" and do hereby re- 
quest all citizens of the Free State to 
participate in the activities to be held 
during that week." 



NOTHING TO HIDE 

University of Maryland's Board of 
Regents requested a budget of more 
than $19,300,000 for the coming year 
and have recommended a public hear- 
ing on their recommendations. 

The budget committee of the Board 
recommended that the regents "offi- 
cially request the Governor to give the 
board a hearing on its budget requests." 

The proposed budget would provide 
20 per cent across-the-board salary 
boosts for faculty members. They 
would come from $1,267,661 in extra 
State funds, if such funds are granted. 

The $19,300,000 total budget would 
be about $3,274,000 higher than for the 
preceding year. 

The committee said: 

"The board is anxious that the pub- 
lic, the people of the State know just 
what the Board is asking and why be- 
fore these requests are passed upon by 
the Governor." 

Normally, Governors prepare their 
budget privately and the public gets 
the details only when the documents 
go to the general assembly. 

The current budget, slightly more 
than 16 million dollars, includes about 
$7,120,000 in State funds. 

For the fiscal year starting next 
July 1, the university wants the State 
to put up an additional $2,117,853, plus 
an increase in the teachers' retirement 
fund. 

• •••••••••••• 
EDWARD STANLEY:— 

"Man's ability to speak distinguishes 
him from the animals; what he says 
distinguishes him from the angels." 




Centurion at the Gate:- "Why does he pull like 
that?" 

Kampus Kitty:- "O, he's smart. He does that 
once each year. He knows when it's Homecoming 
Day at Maryland." 



[14] 



\^olleae of- 

EDUCATION 

By Pat Scanlan, '50 



At Penn State 

SECOND Lieutenant William Don- 
ald Brockmeyer, son of Mrs. Bar- 
bara R. Brockmeyer, Severna Park, 
Maryland recently entered Pennsyl- 
vania State College to begin an in- 
tensive Meteorological curriculum. 

Lt. Brockmeyer's parent organization 
is USAF Institute of Technology at 
Wright-Patterson AF Base, Ohio. This 
activity places Air Force officers in 
civilian schools for advanced technical 
training to meet the great demand for 
officer specialists which is today para- 
mount. Lt. Brockmeyer received his 
Bachelor of Science Degree from the 
College of Education in 1951. 
Shea Family 

Katherine Jean Shea, '42 (Education) 
received a Master of Arts Degree in 
Teacher Education from Springfield 
College, Springfield, Massachusetts. 
Miss Shea is the daughter of the late 
Dr. John J. Shea, Class of '12 (Dental). 
She is a member of the Woodlawn 
School faculty and resides in South 
Hadley, Massachusetts. 

Another member of the Shea family, 
Katherine V. Shea, '13 (Nursing) and 
sister of the late Dr. John J. Shea has 
been advanced to the rank of Fellow 
in the American College of Hospital 
Administrators. At present, Miss Shea 
is Administrator at the North Adams 
Hospital, North Adams, Massachusetts. 
In Japan 

Lt. David W. Roszel, '51, is now 
with the Supply Squadron of the 136th 
Fighter Wing. A former member of 
the Air R.O.T.C., Theta Chi Fraternity, 
an Inter-Fraternity Council representa- 
tive, and President of the Gate and 
Key Society he was recalled to active 
duty in January. At the present time 
he is stationed in Japan. The wing was 
formerly at Langley Air Force Base 
and prior to that time was a part of 
the Texas Air National Guard. 
Received Citation 

In August John R. Mitchell '33 re- 
ceived a citation at the Air Force As- 
sociation Annual Convention held in 
Los Angeles. Known as the Air Force 
Association Presidential Award Cita- 
tion, it is addressed to John R. Mitchell 
and reads as follows: "This is to cer- 
tify that I, as President of the Air 
Force Association, have taken cog- 
nizance of your outstanding contribu- 
tion to American Airpower while serv- 
ing our organization. Accordingly, I 
take this opportunity, on the occasion 
of our Fifth Annual Reunion and Con- 
vention, to express our gratitude for 
your contributions in furthering the 
aims and purposes of the Air Force 
Association, and in particular, for dis- 
tinguished service to AFA by founding 
the first squadron chartered by the As- 
sociation in June, 1946, and continuing 







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your devotion to the aims and purposes 
of the Association. Therefore, with full 
authority vested in me by the member- 
ship of the Association, I take great 
pleasure in presenting you our Air- 
power Plaque Award." 

At the University Mr. Mitchell was 
on the varsity football and lacrosse 
teams, was vice-president of the stu- 
dent body, and was elected to ODK. He 
has continued his interest in the school 
through active participation in the 
Alumni Association, and has assisted 
greatly in the organization of an 
alumni chapter in Baltimore. He is 
now owner of an insurance office. 

[15] 



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MEDICINE 



W. L. Champion, M.D. 

By KATHERINE BARNWELL 
(In The Atlanta Journal) 

A MERRY-EYED, goateed 83-year 
old Atlanta Physician who recalls 
performing operations on dining-room 
tables by kerosene lamp light when he 
began his practice 60 years ago, Dr. 
W. L. Champion, admittedly the "oldest 
urologist in Georgia," was honor guest 
at a dinner given by an associate, Dr. 
Major F. Fowler. 

The entire membership of the Fulton 
County Medical Society had been in- 
vited to pay tribute to Dr. Champion, 
one-time "horse-and-buggy" doctor and 
now a distinguished specialist in his 
field. 

The occasion marked his 83rd birth- 
day. 

Dr. Champion was a 23-year-old 
graduate of the University of Maryland 
School of Medicine when he started out 
with his little black satchel in Eatonton 
and Putnam County in 1891. 

He came to Atlanta two years later 
— and has been practicing here ever 
since. 

He gave up general practice to spe- 
cialize in urology in 1896 after gradu- 
ate study in New York, France and 
Germany. He was Georgia's first urol- 
ogist. 

Dr. Champion has served as presi- 
dent of the Fulton County Medical So- 
ciety, the Atlanta Urological Associa- 
tion and the Georgia Urological Asso- 
ciation. 

Dr. Champion said it would be "im- 
possible" for him to estimate the num- 
ber of patients he has treated during 
his long career, but many of his former 
patients are among his close, personal 
friends. 

"I've treated several generations in 
some families," he noted. 

Married 48 Years 

Dr. Champion was married 48 years 
ago to the former Sue Lou Harwell. 
They have one daughter and two grand- 
children. 

Although his only explanation for 
his long and active life is that he has 
"regular hours and habits," his wife 
smilingly attributes his longevity to 
his work. 



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"He loves practicing medicine," she 
explains. "I don't think he could get 
along without it." 

Dr. Champion said he plans to con- 
tinue his practice "just as long as my 
health permits." 

Heads Delaware Unit 

Dr. Charles E. Gill (School of Medi- 
cine '27), has been appointed medical 
director of Brandywine and Edgewood 
Sanatoria, Delaware, relieving Dr. 
Lawrence D. Phillips who will become 
director of clinical services at Brandy- 
wine. 

Dr. Gill, who will have overall super- 
vision of the two institutions leaves a 
position as district health officer of the 
Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health for the Pittsfield district. 

In that position, which Dr. Gill has 
occupied since he returned from Army 
service in 1946, he has been in charge 
of tuberculosis control work in the 
district. 

He served his interneship at Uni- 
versity Hospital, Baltimore, and was a 
medical resident at the same hospital 
from 1928 to 1931. He went to Boston 
as a teaching fellow at Boston Dis- 
pensary and Tufts College Medical 
School. 

After a year of teaching, in 1932 Dr. 
Gill started his association with the 
Massachusetts Department of Public 
Health as clinic physician and super- 
visor of clinics in the division of tuber- 
culosis. In 1934 he became senior phy- 
sician at the Westfield State Sana- 
torium. 

Dr. Gill then went to Harvard School 
of Public Health on a U. S. Public 
Health Service fellowship, and there re- 
ceived a master of public health degree. 

In 1942 he went into the Army, 
where he served four years, including 
26 months in Italy. A reserve Lieu- 
tenant Colonel, he commands the 1223rd 
Medical Training Unit at Pittsfield. 

At Nevada 

Recently Dr. O. C. Moulton repre- 
sented Maryland at the inauguration 
of the President of the University of 
Nevada. He wrote, "There were about 
140 colleges represented and, as is the 
custom, we lined up in rotation accord- 
ing to the founding of the colleges rep- 
resented. Maryland was ninth in date 
of founding and I received several com- 
pliments from individuals who said 
they had not realized that Maryland 
was one of our oldest of American uni- 
versities. It is with pleasure that I 
look back to my old days at Maryland 
and any time in the future that I can 
be of service to my Alma Mater I will 
be glad to do so." Dr. Moulton has 
offices in Reno, Nevada. 

Intern in Texas 

Lieutenants Ermenia L. Nesci and 
Huth Saunders Salera, members of last 
year's graduating class, Nursing School, 
were among fourteen dietetic interns 
who completed one year of intensive 
training at Brooke Army Hospital, Fort 
Sam Houston, Texas, and received cer- 
tificates of completion. 



[16] 



Ljienn oL. fr/artin L^oiiege of- 

ENGINEERING and 
AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 



By Robert K. Warner '47 




Charles M. White 



MARYLAND ALUMNUS Charles 
M. White (Maryland Engineer- 
ing- '14), President of Republic Steel 
Corporation was featured on the cover 
of Business Week magazine. The cor- 
poration's economic education program 
was highlighted in 
a four-page article 
in the magazine's 
management depart- 
ment. 

The outstanding 
work of Mr. White 
and his associates in 
organizing economic 
education classes for 
Republic Steel em- 
ployees so impressed 
the editors that he 
was chosen for the 
cover photograph, a much sought after 
honor among business executives. 

The corporation's education program 
is conducted in cooperation with the 
Industrial Relations Center of the Uni- 
versity of Chicago. 

About 2,500 will take the basic course 
of 15 lessons. Classes will be held, on 
company time, in Republic's offices, 
coal and iron mines, and 26 plants. 

For another 3,000 who graduated 
from the basic course last year, Repub- 
lic has added a second-year course in 
economics, with stress on current prob- 
lems. 

Voluntary Courses 
Both courses are voluntary. But if 
last year's experience is any test, about 
859c of Republic's supervisory person- 
nel will be attending the classes when 
they get fully under way in October. 
Only in recent years has top man- 
agement of such big companies as Re- 
public Steel become interested in train- 
ing employees in the ground rules of 
economics. And few plans go as far 
as Republic's in measuring the results. 
But economics - training programs in 
industry are spreading steadily. 

Mr. White is enthusiastic over the 
plan. He has been sure for a long time 
that labor-management problems would 
be a lot simpler if more people knew 
more about economics. But it wasn't 
until the present program was put to- 
gether that it could be done within 
industry's own plants. 

When the whole package is ready 
for use by other companies, White will 
have rounded out his three-part drive 
to broadcast the businessman's eco- 
nomic views as widely as possible. The 
ether two parts: A speakers' bureau of 
trained Republic officials and a hard- 
hitting advertising campaign. 

Mr. White himself has reason to 
swear by the American economic sys- 



tem. A college man, with a University 
of Maryland degree in mechanical en- 
gineering, he helped, during college 
vacations, support himself as a tele- 
phone lineman, leather tanner, and rail- 
road construction worker. 

His first job was with American 
Bridge Co. in 1913 as a machinist's 
helper. Before long he was a plant 
superintendent. In 1927 he became as- 
sistant general superintendent of the 
Aliquippa Works of Jones & Laughlin 
Steel Corp. He went to Republic three 
years later as assistant vice-president 
in charge of operations, became vice- 
president in 1935, then president at the 
end of World War II. 

Mr. White believes that such a rise 
through the ranks is possible only as 
long as the U. S. economic system stays 
pretty much as it is. 

At Stamford, Connecticut 

Recent additions to the staff of the 
Stamford Research Laboratories of the 
American Cyanamid Company, Stam- 
ford, Conn., includes Charles Federline 
(Eng. '51). Mr. Federline is connected 
with ACC's Sales Training Group. 

Important Lectures 

The Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
and Applied Mathematics held public 
lectures by Drs. S. R. DeGroot, R. W. 
Gurney, and J. Kampe de Feriet, Visit- 
ing Research Professors at the Institute. 

Dr. S. R. DeGroot is Professor of 
Theoretical Physics at the University 
of Utrecht. He spoke on Thermo- 
dynamics of Irreversible Processes, 
"The Onsager Theory," "Applications 
in Physics and Chemistry" and "Ther- 
modynamics and Hydrodynamics." 

Dr. R. W. Gurney gave a series of 
three lectures on Problems in the Sta- 
tistical Mechanics of Alloys, "The 
Method of Molecular Environments — 
Communal Entropy," "Substances not 
Miscible in all Proportions," and "So- 
lutions in Alpha-iron and Gamma- 
iion." 

Dr. J. Kampe de Feriet spoke on Tur- 
bulence and Erosion, "Turbulence and 
Boundary Layer," "Wind Erosion, 
Sandstorms and Sand Dunes," and 
"Diffusion and Transportation of 
Sand." 

On State Board 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin ap- 
pointed Dean S. S. Steinberg to a third 
consecutive five-year term on the State 
Board of Registration for Professional 
Engineers and Land Surveyors. 

Steinberg, dean of the Glenn L. Mar- 
tin College of Engineering and Aero- 
nautical Sciences, has been a member 
of the board since 1941 and has been 
its chairman since 1949. 



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Don Sawtelle, Winner 

Donald Wing Sawtelle was one of 
the winners of Engineering honors and 
a cash award given by the Lincoln Arc 
Welding Foundation of Cleveland, Ohio, 
to 63 young engineers in 28 different 
States, representing 34 different 
schools. Funds were also awarded to 
3 engineering schools to establish schol- 
arships in honor of and named for the 
engineers receiving the main awards. 

The awai'ds were made in the fourth 
annual competition of the Foundation's 
Engineering Undergraduate Award and 
Scholarship Program. The Program of- 
fers awards for papers by engineering 
undergraduates on the design, fabrica- 



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tion, research or maintenance of ma- 
chines or structures in which arc weld- 
ing is used. The Foundation is sponsor- 
ing a 10-year series of programs to en- 
courage undergraduate engineers to use 
imagination and ingenuity in develop- 
ing engineering projects. Sawtelle's 
paper was titled "Arc Welded Die Con- 
struction." 

Dates for the next annual competi- 
tion have been announced by the Foun- 
dation as June 1, 1951 to May 31, 1952. 
Engineering undergraduates are eligible 
to participate while they are registered 
as an undergraduate. Rules are avail- 
able from James F. Lincoln, Arc Weld- 
ing Foundation, Cleveland 17, Ohio. 

Stationed in Missouri 

Alumnus Lieut. Colonel Charles C. 
Holbrook (Civ. Eng. '39) is stationed at 
Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. 

Colonel Holbrook had been in the 
Plans and Training Section of the En- 
gineer Center, Fort Belvoir, Va., for 
three years. At Fort Leonard Wood, 
he is Commanding Officer for the 35th 
Engineers Construction Group. 

He entered service in 1940, and, 
with the Fifth Engineer Combat Regi- 
ment went overseas. Twenty-seven 
months in Iceland, and six in England 
and the outfit fought through France, 
Holland, Belgium and Germany. Hol- 
brook wears campaign ribbons for Nor- 
mandy, Northern France, the Ardennes, 
the Rhineland and Central Germany. 

Mrs. Holbrook, the former Jane Page, 
also is a graduate of Maryland. There 
are two little Holbrooks. 

Smoke Eaters Convene 

Visiting firemen had a hot time in 
the old town of College Park when the 
University's Eighteenth Annual Short 
Course for Firemen began its week of 
activity. Director Robert C. Byrus of 
the Fire Service Extension had more 
than 30 smokeaters on hand for the 
four days of classroom instruction and 
demonstration. 

Sessions got underway with regis- 
tration, followed by an address by Dr. 
H. C. Byrd, President of the University. 

Lectures concerning leadership, fire 
problems, fire fighting tactics, fire pre- 
vention, civil defense, atomic warfare 
fire problems, and other related material 
were given along with practical demon- 
strations. 

Fluid Dynamics; Applied Mathematics 

Four members from the Institute 
presented papers on September 11 and 
12 at Cornell University, Ithaca, New 
York where the Fluid Dynamics Di- 
vision of the American Physical Society 
met. The papers and authors are as 
follows: "Thermodynamic Foundations 
of Hydrodynamics" by S. R. DeGroot; 
"Interferometric Studies of Two-Di- 
mensional Turbulent Jet Mixing at a 
Mach No. of 1.7" by Daniel Bershader 
and Boyd Cary; "On Sunevsonic Plow 
of Jet in Uniform Stream" by S. I. Pai 
and "Growth of Laminar Boundary 
Layer Behind a Shock Wave" by R. K. 
Lobb. 

The Institute announced a series of 
nublic lectures held in the Engineering 
Building. "Thermodynamics of Irre- 
versible Processes" was the subject of 

[18] 



three lectures by S. R. DeGroot, Pro- 
fessor of Theoretical Physics, Univer- 
sity of Utrecht; R. W. Gurney pres- 
sonted three lectures on "Problems in 
the Statistical Mechanics of Alloys" 
and "Turbulence and Erosion" was the 
subject of three lectures by J. Kampe 
De Feriet, Professor of Math at the 
University of Lille. All three lecturers 
are visiting lesearch professors at the 
institute. 

Now with the institute as a visiting 
research associate in Theoretical Aero- 
dynamics is Dr. R. E. Meyer, Research 
Fellow at the University of Manchester. 
Also as a visiting research associate in 
Theoietical Aerodynamics is Dr. D. C. 
Pack, Lecturer in Math at the Univer- 
sity of St. Andrews in Dundee, Scotland. 

In addition to the visitors above there 
are four new post-doctoral research 
fellows and two graduate research as- 
sistants with the Institute. 

On D.C. Panel 

Dean S. S. Steinberg, chairman of 
the Committee on Education of Presi- 
dent Truman's Conference on Industrial 
Safety, was invited by the Board of 
Commissioners of the District of 
Columbia to serve as a panel member 
at a Conference on Industrial Safety 
held on November 10, 1951 at the Dis- 
trict Building. This is an outgrowth of 
President Truman's National Confer- 
ence in 1948 designed to study national 
losses from industrial accidents. A 
recommendation of that conference was 
that each state and territory call simi- 
lar meetings to study the problem from 
a local angle. Some indication of the 
importance of accident prevention can 
be realized by an examination of the 
statistics. For example, in Washington, 
D. C, for 1950 there were 30,000 work- 
ers reported injured — 53 fatally — at a 
cost of $1.5 million for compensation 
and medical service. 

On Guidance Committee 

The Engineers' Council for Profes- 
sional Development of the Engineering 
Societies in Baltimore have formed a 
Guidance Committee to which Dean 
S. S. Steinberg has been appointed. It 
is the purpose of this committee to aid 
prospective students to choose the 
careers for which they are best adapted 
if they are considering engineering. 

A.A.A. 

Dean S. S. Steinberg was recently 
reappointed a member of the District 
of Columbia Advisory Board of the 




Chem. '51 : "This invention I have, gentlemen, 
will make us all rich!" 

The Board: "What is it?" 

Chem. '51 : "I've invented a seedless fift in- 
tended to be eaten and enjoyed by old people 
«ith dentures." 



American Automobile Association on 
which he has served for many years. 

Aeronautical Engineering 
Professor A. W. Sherwood, Director 
of Wind Tunnel Operations and Acting 
Head of the Aeronautical Engineering 
Department, announces the acquisition 
of a new six-inch supersonic wind tun- 
nel and another large vacuum tank to 
be used in conjunction with all the wind 
tunnels. This tank more than doubles 
the previous capacity. The new wind 
tunnel will achieve velocities up to 
three times the speed of sound and is 
one of the best in the country available 
to students. The tank and wind tunnel 
were obtained in trade for some surplus 
production machinery that the depart- 
ment had on hand. 

Professor Sherwood says, also, that 
the testing facilities of the large sub- 
sonic wind tunnel are booked solid until 
well into 1952 by the Glenn L. Martin 
Company, the Naval Ordnance Labora- 
tory and the MacDonnell Aircraft Cor- 
poration. 

At Ft. Geo. G. Meade 

Pvt. Jeremy F. Criss (C.E. June '51), 
has completed processing at the 2053d 
Reception Center Ft. Geo. G. Meade and 
has been assigned for Army basic train- 
ing. 

George W. Bryan 

Howard T. Ennis, superintendent of 
the Delaware Colony, the state training 
school operated at Stockley by the 
Delaware Commission for the Feeble 
Minded, has resigned and George W. 
Bryan, an administrator of hospitals 
in Florida, has been appointed to suc- 
ceed him, it was announced recently 
by Mrs. Nan F. Campbell, president of 
the commission. 

Mr. Bryan will take over his new 
duties at the hospital on Oct. 1, as 
acting superintendent. 

The new superintendent served as ad- 
ministrator of the Baptist Memorial 
Hospital at Tallahassee, Fla., from 1948 
to 1950. He directed the work of con- 
verting a 500-bed Army hospital into a 
100-bed general hospital, and of staffing 
the hospital with all its personnel. He 
then was in charge of operating the 
hospital. Later he consulted with archi- 
tects on plans for a new 150-bed hos- 
pital which was built under his adminis- 
tration. Patients were moved into the 
new building and he was in charge of 
operating the new hospital until he re- 
signed in 1950. 

He then became business manager 
for the Florida State Tuberculosis 
Board. He handled the state's rela- 
tions with the contractors during final 
stages of construction, and supervised 
the equipping and staffing of a 500-bed 
tuberculosis hospital at Lantana, Fla. 

Mr. Bryan operated the hospital for 
a time, then trained a successor, and 
was transferred to Tallahassee to write 
specifications for two more tuberculosis 
hospitals being built by the board. 

The new appointee is a graduate of 
the University of Maryland, where he 
received a bachelor's degree in 1932 and 
a master's degree two years later, both 




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in engineering. He was employed as a 
machinist at the Washington Navy 
Yai-d while attending college. 

At Naval Ordnance Lab 

Irvin Carl Henschen, (Eng. '51) has 
been appointed a mechanical engineer 
at one of the country's newest and 
most complete scientific laboratories, 
the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, White 
Oak, Maryland. In his position at the 
Laboratory he will work in the Mine 
and Depth Charge Division of the 
Underwater Ordnance Department. 

William Purser Deavers, Jr., has also 
been appointed a mechanical engineer 
at Naval Ordnance Laboratory. 

He received his B.S.M.E. in June '51. 
Mr. Deavers will work in the Design 
& Engineering Services Division of the 
Public Works Department. 

James H. Potts, Jr., '50 is likewise 
with the Naval Ordnance Laboratory at 
White Oak, Maryland. He recently as- 
sisted his wife, a graduate of Emory 
University, in an extensive alumni cele- 
bration for that school. Mrs. Potts 
has agreed to return the favor when 
her husband is asked to assist in a 
similar function for the University of 
Maryland. 

Dr. Weinstein 

Dr. A. Weinstein, Research Professor 
at the Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics has presented an 
invited address at the Symposium on 
Linear Equations and the Determina- 
tion of Eigenvalues. The Symposium 
was sponsored by the National Bureau 
of Standards and the Office of Naval 
Research in Los Angeles. 



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Co(L ro f HOME 
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By Lucy Knox and 
Mary Speake Humelsine 



MARILYN LANGFORD, a June 
1951 graduate of Home Eco- 
nomics, was awarded the first of the 
Alice Crocker Lloyd, Alpha Lambda 
Delta $750.00 scholarships for gradu- 
ate work. 

Numerous candidates for the award 
represented various 
universities through- 
out the country. 
Membership in Al- 
pha Lambda Delta 
is limited to stu- 
dents who, during 
their freshman year, 
achieve an average 
of 95 or better. 

Miss Langford is 
the daughter of Dr. 
and Mrs. George 
Langford. Dr. Lang- 
ford is Professor of Entomology at the 
University of Maryland. Miss Langford 
has chosen to attend Ohio State Uni- 
versity for her graduate work in home 
economics education. 

During her four years at College 
Park, Miss Langford was the consis- 
tent recipient of high scholastic honors 
and awards. She was Vice President 
of Alpha Lambda Delta, President of 
Omicron Nu, home economics honor- 
ary; Vice President of Mortar Board; 
and a member of Phi Kappa Phi, na- 
tional senior scholastic honorary, and 
Pi Delta Epsilon, national jorunalism 
honorary. She was listed in Who's Who 
in American Universities, and in 1950, 
won the Danforth Summer Fellowship. 

In Sweden 

In her freshman year she repre- 
sented the United States at an Inter- 
national Girl Guide Encampment in 
Sweden. She is also a member of an 
International Girl Scout Group in 
Washington, D. C. 

Miss Langford has been Treasurer, 
Editor, and Historian of Kappa Alpha 
Theta social sorority. She has been a 
reporter for the Diamondback, Senior 
Editor of the Terrapin, and Copy Edi- 
tor of the "M" Book. 

She has been narrator for May Day, 
Chairman of the World Student Service 
Fund Drive, a member of the Dean's 
Freshman Week Committee and the 
Reception Committee for the Junior 
Prom, Secretary of the Cantei'bury 
Club, and has worked backstage for 
the University Theater. 

Farm Queen 

Maryland's new farm queen is Betty 
Jean Endslow, 18-year-old Harford 
County girl who won the title in com- 
petition with 21 other county winners. 

She reigned as queen of the Timoni- 
um State Fair. 

Miss Endslow, a graduate of Bel Air 



[20] 



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High School, plans to study home eco- 
nomics at Maryland. 

Judges were Miss Margaret E. Hol- 
loway, home demonstration agent for 
Baltimore County; Miss Helen Shelby, 
clothing specialist with the Extension 
Service at the University of Maryland, 
and Mrs. Abram Pearce of the Mary- 
land Council of Homemakers. 
In Cleveland 

Miss Pela Braucher of the College of 
Home Economics attended a confer- 
ence of the American Dietetic Associa- 
tion in Cleveland. She represented the 
Professional Education Committee of 
the Maryland Chapter. 



LETTER FROM "ROSY" 

It is always a pleasure to hear from 
former Alumni Secretary, "Rosy" Pol- 
lock. Through "Maryland" we pass 
along his best wishes to his many 
alumni and University friends. "Rosy" 
begins with an apology for not writing 
more often and there are many who 
agree we should hear from him more 
frequently. Circular letters concerning 
alumni affairs and "M" Club functions 
signed by Dr. Cory, Joe Deckman, Al 
Heagy and others eventually bring him 
around to a good letter. 

"Rosy" has seen many alumni on the 
other side of the Pacific and if any 
would stay for a good length of time, 
we feel sure there would be an alumni 
Club in Tokyo. "Rosy" writes, "In a few 
days I will celebrate the sixth anni- 
versary of my landing in Japan (on the 
30 August, 1945). Also, if the Peace 
treaty is signed, I will have seen the 
occupation from surrender to peace 
and, maybe, to ratification. We are 
now drawing the occupation programs 
to a close but will continue some busi- 
ness. Give my best to all." 



TO LONDON 



Charles Ray Mayes, a former Uni- 
versity of Maryland student in History, 
has been awarded a Fulbright scholar- 
ship for study at the University of 
London. 

Mr. Mayes came to the Graduate 
School at Maryland from Missouri and 
took his Master's degree in History in 
1948, working particularly in the field 
of Medieval History. He then studied 
for a year in Paris under Maryland's 
Foreign Study Program. Since that 



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• • 



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• •••••••• 
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[21] 



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FELLOWSHIPS FOR WOMEN 

Twenty-five fellowships are offered 
by the American Association of Uni- 
versity Women to American women for 
advanced study or research during the 
academic year 1952-53. 

In general, the $1,500 fellowships are 
awarded to young women who have 
completed two years of residence work 
for the Ph.D. degree or who have al- 
ready received the degree; the $2,000 
— $2,200 awards to more advanced stu- 
dents or those who may need to study 
abroad; the $3,000 awards to more ma- 
tin e scholars who need a year of un- 
interrupted work for writing and re- 
search. Unless otherwise specified, the 
fellowships are unrestricted as to sub- 
ject and place of study. 

Applications and supporting mate- 
rials must reach the office in Washing- 
ton by December 15, 1951. For detailed 
information concerning these fellow- 
ships and instructions for applying, ad- 
dress the Secretary, Committee on 
Fellowship Awards, American Associa- 
tion of University Women, 1634 Eye 
Street, N.W., Washington 6, D.C. 

Fellowships offered and stipend in- 
volved: 

$1,000 — for research outside the United 
States, in eugenics and euthen- 
ics; 
$1,000 — for study in social work; 
$1,500 — fourteen fellowships, unrestrict- 
ed; 
$1 ,500 — to graduate of any college be- 
longing to the Southern Associ- 
ation of Colleges and Secondary 
Schools, preferably in the field 
of history; 
$1,500 — for study or research outside 

the United States; 
$2,000 — three fellowships, unrestricted; 
$2,000 — for research in chemistry, phys- 
ics, or biology (The doctorate 
is required.) ; 
$2,000 — for study or research outside 

the United States; 
$2,200— unrestricted ; 
$S,0C0 — two fellowships, unrestricted. 



POLICE SCHOOL 

A Police "In Service" School is being 
conducted by the University in co- 
operation with the Maryland State 
Police, the American Automobile As- 
sociation, the Federal Bureau of Inves- 
tigation, and the State's Attorneys and 
Magistrates of Prince George's County. 

The schedule consists of classes of 
three hours each on September 11 and 
November 13, 1951, and on January 8, 
March 11, and May 13, 1952. Daniel B. 



Wiseman, Chief of the University's 
Police Department, is Course Director. 

The school is open to members of 
Police Departments, Mayors and Coun- 
cil Members of Maryland municipali- 
ties. No expense is involved. Certifi- 
cates will be issued at the completion 
of the courses. 

"Traffic" was the subject for the ini- 
tial class on September 11, with mem- 
bers of the Maryland State Police and 
the American Automobile Association 
delivering lectures, visual instructions, 
and showing motion pictures. Lectures 
were by Major R. M. Ridgley, Cpl. J. A. 
Mclsaac, TFC J. F. White, Claud R. 
McCamment, and Richard Hartman. 

"Court Room Procedure" and "Conduct 
on the Witness Stand" will be the sub- 
jects for the class on November 13, 1951, 
with lectures by the Honorable Dudley 
Diggs, Judge, 7th Judicial Circuit of 
Maryland; the Honorable Franklin 
Lillard, Jr., member of the House of 
Delegates; States Attorney Carlisle 
Lancaster; and members of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland faculty. 

On January 8, 1952, the classes will 
hear lectures on "Reports and Files" 
and "Evidence" by Capt. G. E. David- 
son and Lt. J. T. Knight of the Mary- 
land State Police and members of the 
F. B. I. 

"Boys Clubs as a Police Activity" 
will be the subject of a lecture on 
March 11, 1952, by Lt. William Har- 
tung of the Baltimore City Police De- 
partment, and "The Value of Photog- 
raphy in Evidence," presented by Sgt. 
P. B. Rowland of the Maryland State 
Police and members of the Prince 
George's County Police. 

"Criminal Investigation" and "Inter- 
rogation" will be the subjects for 
classes conducted on May 13, 1952, by 
Capt. G. E. Davidson, Sgt. J. J. Cas- 
sidy, and Sgt. G. D Newcomer, of the 
Maryland State Police 




(.us:- "What position does your friend play?" 
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[22] 



C(L r of SPECIAL and 
CONTINUATION STUDIES 



At Fort Eustis 

MAJOR George A. Lutz, who at- 
tended University of Maryland 
classes at Heidelberg, Germany, from 
1949 to June 1951, is attending the 
Transportation Officer Advanced Course 
at Fort Eustis, Va. 

A former student of Mahanoy Town- 
ship High School, Lehigh University, 
and University of Maryland, Major 
Lutz entered the Army as an enlisted 
man in 1938, attended the Quarter- 
master Officer Candidate School, Camp 
Lee, and was commissioned in 1943. 

Purpose of the Fort Eustis course is 
to provide officers with a thorough 
knowledge of the duties and responsi- 
bilities of field grade transportation 
officers. The course includes training 
in the common military subjects of Per- 
sonnel and Administration, Supply and 
Logistics, Intelligence, and Combined 
Arms; as well as training in technical 
tiansportation subjects in the High- 
way, Marine, Rail, Movements, and 
General Transportation fields. The 
scope covers planning, procedure, and 
operations within the continental United 
States and theaters of operation. 

At Newfoundland 

At the request of the North East Air 
Command, the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies inaugurated its 
Newfoundland program. Lasting for a 
period of eight weeks, the Newfound- 
land program was conducted by local 
campus teachers at three Air Force 
bases: Harmon, Mc Andrew, and Pepper- 
rell. 

One hundred fourteen students, most- 
ly military personnel pursuing a degree 
of Bachelor of Science in Military Sci- 
ence, took advantage of the courses 
given three hours a night, twice a week. 

Instructors for the courses were 
James E. Rice, Economics; Morton V. 
Malin, History; and Robert E. Goostree, 
Government and Politics. 

The Newfoundland program was con- 
tinued and expanded to include Goose 
Bay Air Force Base in Labrador. 

IN TIME 

Time, the weekly newsmagazine re- 
cently printed, under the heading 

"Overseas Campus," 

"Most of the world's undergraduates 
were still on vacation. But on one of the 
world's largest campuses, some 3,000 
were taking final exams. From Bremen, 
in cool north Germany, to Asmara, high 
on an African plateau, American serv- 
icemen and a handful of civilian em- 
ployees trooped to their classrooms, 
sweated over questions that ranged 
from literature to logistics. These stu- 
dents were members of the University 
of Maryland's College of Special and 
Continuation Studies. 



"Maryland started its extension 
courses for the armed forces five years 
ago, when some cf its professors were 
invited to the Pentagon to lecture on 
public speaking and history. Soon they 
were holding classes in science and the 
humanities at other military posts in 
the Washington area. But there was 
one big hurdle: too often students were 
ordered overseas in the middle of a 
term. 

"In Germany, in England, at air 
bases in North Africa, G.I.s who were 
homesick for college campuses, frus- 
trated students from U. of M.'s exten- 
sion courses in Washington, pilots who 
were feeling the squeeze of new educa- 
tional requirements for commissions — 
all clamored for further schooling. In 
October 1949, planning on a maximum 
of 500 students, the Army shipped a 
supply of books and Maryland profes- 
sors to six centers in Germany. On 
registration day, they were swamped 
with 1,800 applicants. 

"Gradually, supply caught up with 
demand. Today the college, with head- 
quarters in Heidelberg, has more than 
100 instructors, who travel as far 
afield as Eritrea, teaching a five-term 
bchedule. (The Army and Air Force 
pay three-quarters of military stu- 
dents' fees, provide classrooms, handle 
legistration and collect fees.) 

"Average age of the G.I. students 
hovers close to 28. (A young (23) staff 
sergeant may find himself sitting next 
to a 48-year-old major. 'Lots of us 
have the creaks in our bones,' remarked 
a paunchy captain, 'but we're trying 
to keep them out of our minds.' " 

In Naval Research 

The Southern Regional Education 
Program named Dr. Joseph M. Ray, 
Dean of the College of Special and 
Continuation Studies, as one of twelve 
educators who met in Washington to 
help build a bridge between southern 
colleges and one of the nation's ex- 
. tensive science cen- 
ters, the Naval Re- 
search Laboratory. 

Appointment of the 
group as a Committee 
of the Board of Con- 
trol for Southern Re- 
gional Education was 
announced by John E. 
Ivey, Jr., program 
director. 

"We hope not only 
to stimulate southern 
schools in the use of these arrange- 
ments which offer such excellent tech- 
nical facilities, but to find new methods 
by which the universities and NRL can 
benefit through cooperation," said Di- 
rector Ivey. "The NRL people have 
expressed real interest in the possi- 
bilities, and the committee of educators 
has an outstanding opportunity." 




Dr. Ray 




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[23] 



Ex-Sailor Gal Shows 'Em 

Mrs. Virginia Buttles, wife of Mr. 
Bruce Buttles, public affairs officer with 
the American Embassy at Belgrade, 
did not let the arrival of an 8V2 -pound 
daughter interfere with the completion 
of her History VI course. 

Mrs. Buttles had come to Trieste so 



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that her expected baby could be born 
in the 7th Station Hospital there. Mrs. 
Buttles decided to register in the 
History VI course which was beginning 
at the time of her arrival. She con- 
tinued with the course until the night 
ot the final exam — the same night her 
baby was born. The new mother, feel- 
ing fine the next day, asked to take 
her final exam and passed with a high 
grade. 

Mrs. Buttles is the daughter of Mr. 
and Mrs. W. S. Gilmar of Gunnison, 
Colorado. She was a lieutenant in the 
Navy during World War II and at one 
time was officer in charge of the Lon- 
don Communication Center. She mar- 
ried Bruce Buttles of Fresno, Cali- 
fornia, in 1949, in Vienna. 
To Vienna 
The United States Department of 
State has announced the granting of 
a Fulbright Award to Dr. Adolf E. 
Zucker, Director of the University of 
Maryland's European Program. The 
grant is for research at the University 
-— ^^^~- '^ of Vienna in the his- 
tory of the German 
stage. 

The award is one 
of approximately 340 
grants included in 
the program for 1951- 
52, made under pro- 
vision of the Fulbright 
Act for lecturing and 
research abroad. The 
candidates were se- 
lected by a Board of 
Foreign Scholarships 
appointed by President Truman. 

Dr. Zucker, who came to the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in 1923 as a Pro- 
fessor of Modern Languages, studied 
at the University of Illinois, the Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania, the Sorbonne, 
and the College de France. 

The author of several research books 
on literature and the theatre, Dr. 
Zucker wrote publications in China, 
India, and Liberia. 

Co-Operative Nursery School 
A special course, "The Cooperative 
Nursery School," was given through 
the Department of Nursery School — 
Kindergarten Education, by the College 
of Special and Continuation Studies. 
The course was taught by Mrs. Annie 
Laura McCune. 

The course was designed for teachers 
in cooperatives and parents desiring to 
organize such a type of school. Meth- 
ods, programing, materials, and the 
differences between cooperative and 
regular nursery schools was explained. 
Mrs. McCune has had many years of 
experience in cooperative nursery 
schools. She has taught at the Na- 
tional Child Research Center, Washing- 
ton, the Kensington Cooperative, Ken- 
sington, the Grace Church Cooperative 
in Silver Spring, and has been Director 
of the Montgomery County Jewish 
Community Center Nursery School. 

* + ••••••••*•• 
SHAKESPEARE:— 
"Ignorance is the curse of God; 
knowledge the wi>i(/ wherewith we fly 
to heaven." 



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[24] 



i^otleae of- 

MILITARY 
SCIENCE 



Military Police Unit 

MARYLAND will be the base for 
a new Army reserve unit, the 
4C0th Military Police battalion, Mili- 
tary District of Washington. 

Maryland will be the base for a new 
Army reserve unit, the 400th Military 
Police battalion, Military District of 
Washington. 

Members will probably be limited to 
university students only in a cadre with 
all eligible for ratings or commissions. 

The usual mental and physical re- 
quirements for military service must 
be met. The applicant must be at least 
18 years old and have not yet taken the 
first physical for the draft. A person 
whose draft classification has been 
changed within the last four or five 
months is not eligible. Veterans are 
eligible. 

The unit will meet twice monthly and 
the members will receive the usual re- 
serve pay. 

Enlistments run for three years, and 
the unit is subject to call to active duty. 
All men will receive the rank of staff 
sergeant or above. 

Recruiting personnel will function 
under Lieutenant William B. Virtz. 

In Newfoundland 

Capt. Theodore R. Pope of Kew Gar- 
dens, N. Y., has been assigned opera- 
tions officer at Pepperrell Air Force 
Base, Newfoundland. 

Captain Pope is an ex-student of 
Lehigh University and the University 
of Maryland '49 and '50. He served in 
World War II as a B-26 pilot in Ireland 
and France. 

Before being transferred to Pepper- 
rell, Captain Pope was flying safety 
director at Boiling AFB, Washington, 
D. C. 

He has three children, Carol Ann, 
Theodore R. Jr., and Gregory Alan. 

At Wright-Patterson 

Captain Richard Van Bruggen com- 
pleted an intensive Industrial Admin- 
istration curriculum at USAF Insti- 
tute of Technology, 
Wright - Patterson 
AF Base, Dayton, 0. 
Holder of the Dis- 
tinguished Flying 
Cross and three Air 
Medals, Capt. Van 
Bruggen served ex- 
tensively during the 
war as a B-17 Pilot 
and Bombadier with 
the 8th AF in Eng- 
land. 

Capt^Van Bruggen Capt y an fi 

gen attended Rensselaer Polytechnic 
Institute, and the University of Mary- 
land where he received his Bachelor of 




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Science Degree (Military Science), in 
1950. 

His recent work at USAF Institute 
of Technology fits Capt. Van Bruggen 
for work in technical fields where AF 
requirements for specialists are today 
paramount. 

The University's Air Force ROTC 
program has been expanded to include 
a unit at Maryland State College, 
Princess Anne, which brings the total 
number of enrolled cadets to 2400, ac- 
cording to a spokesman for the Military 
department. 

The new unit has 300 students, basic 
and advanced, and includes courses 
taught at College Park. The School is 
staffed by two officers and two non- 
commissioned officers. 

[25] 



With a staff of 23 officers and 23 non- 
coms, Maryland again leads the list as 
the largest AFROTC unit. Ohio State 
runs a close second. 

In order to enter advanced AFROTC, 
the student must be a junior and have 
completed two years of basic ROTC or 
its equivalent. After two years of ad- 
vanced, the graduate is given either a 
reserve or an active commission. 



* • • 



• * • 



• •••••* 
HENRY FORI):— 

"A man who watches the clock gen- 
erally remains one of the hands." 



• • 



* • • 



• ••••••• 
THOS. HARDY:— 

"The easiest way to get to the top is 
to go to the bottom of things." 













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AGRICULTURE 

By Warren E. Tydings '35 



Says Richard L. Coe:- 

IN HIS theater column, "One on the 
Aisle," Richard L. Coe, top flight 
columnist for The Washington Post, in 
a story titled "You Don't Always See 
the Blind," pays tribute to the indomit- 
able fortitude of Irvin Schloss, a Uni- 
versity of Maryland student. 

As an entomologist he was about to 
embark on a malaria control unit for 
India, when he was called to the service 
and sent to Ohio State to study engi- 
neering. The ASTP lasted six months, 
after which he was sent to Ft. Knox, 
trained as a tank gunner and sent over- 
seas. A HE shell sprayed hot metal 
all around his tank and he lost the 
sight of both eyes. He came to Valley 
Forge and was successfully re-trained 
in journalism. 

Mr. Coe writes, "Yesterday I lunched 
with a blind fellow and for the first 
half-hour didn't know he was blind. . . . 
We'd met to talk about a movie called 
'Bright Victory,' Playhouse-bound, and 
he was introduced as Irvin Schloss, edi- 
tor of the B. V. A. Bulletin, publication 
of the Blinded Veterans Association. 
. . . Irvin hides his cane under a chair, 
gauges the position of your face from 
the sound of your voice and seems to 
look at you through clear blue eyes, 
which I later found were plastic. . . . 
'Our plastic eyes cause lots of laughs,' 
he observed. "There was a fellow at 
Valley Forge who took one out in the 
PX and put it by his beer glass. 'I 
just want to keep an eye on this drink,' 
he cracked. . . . 

"A Sane Guy" 

"Irvin's purpose in life is to convince 
people that blindness doesn't make you 
different from anyone else. . . . 'Used to 
get my dates — before I was married — 
to take me to the burlesque shows and 
describe what was going off; eventually 
it made the girls realize I was no differ- 
ent from any other guy.' . . . 

"Schloss was blinded during a tank 
battle in Fiance; up till then, a Univer- 
sity of Maryland student, he'd wanted 
to be an etymologist, so writing was a 
logical progression. . . . 

"The Talking Book" 

"Fortunately he was a well-integrat- 
ed fellow after the initial shock had 
worn off, decided to face life without 
feeling sorry for himself. . . . 'There 
were a lot of blind people before the 
war,' he points out, 'and the talking 
book series, which means so much to 
our members, was well under way. 
Those wonderful recordings which are 
loaned free to the blind through the 
Library of Congress and regional li- 
braries, are magnificent and have 
almost made Braille old-fashioned. . . . 
Yes, I go to the movies with my wife 
and you might be surprised how much 
one can get out of them simply by 



listening. It isn't a sixth sense the blind 
develop; it's simply better use of the 
senses we're born with. I think you'll 
find this film, with Arthur Kennedy as 
a blinded veteran, gives you the idea 
we've learned from experience — that 
being blind doesn't change a man. We 
remain individuals and once that first 
shock is past we have a crack at going 
back to our own work. Why, one of 
our guys is a vice president of Ameri- 
can Business Machines.' " 
At Fort Meade 

Fort Meade, Md., Oct. 3— Pvt. John L. 
Thompson, Agri. '51, of Mt. Airy, Md., 
has been assigned to the Fort Meade 
Medical Replacement Training Center 
for Army basic training. 
In Kansas City 

James E. Murray, '51, an Entomology 
major, has been assigned the mid-West 
territory for the Pennsylvania Salt 
Manufacturing Company. A native of 
Washington, he will now make his 
headquarters the new District Sales 
Office in Kansas City, Missouri. 
Receive Awards 

Drs. R. B. Guyer, A. Kramer and 
L. E. Ide of the Department of Horti- 
culture received Woodbury Awards for 
excellence in research, at the recent 
meeting of the American Society for 
Horticultural Science. Drs. James B. 
Shanks and C. B. Link of the flori- 
culture division and J. R. Haun of the 
Botany Department received honorable 
mention for research in the mineral 
nutrition of Hydrangeas. 



HIGH SCHOOL GUESTS 

All high school seniors in the state 
of Maryland, the District of Columbia 
and nearby Virginia were invited by 
President Byrd to visit College Park 
campus, have luncheon, and attend the 
George Washington-Maryland game and 
pre-game entertainment. 

A reception committee greeted guests 
in the Armory. Two students, as host 
and hostess, accompanied each group. 
Identification ribbons admitted guests 
to the luncheon and the game. 

A tour of the campus included visits 
to some of the more interesting de- 
partments such as the engineering, in- 
dustrial education and home economics 
buildings; the agricultural research 
laboratories; the radio studio; the Uni- 
versity Theater stage and dressing 
looms; and the men's and women's 
dormitories, as well as the historic "old 
campus." 

Heads of the various departments 
were in their offices, available for in- 
dividual conferences. They also at- 
tended the luncheon. 




"Come on, Ingeborg, let's bo to Albrecht's and 
surround a coke." 

"No, Arvid, I'm staying in the dorm tonight 
for study." 



[26] 



L^olteae of 

ARTS and SCIENCES 

ANNUAL REPORT 

By Edward M. Rider 
Chairman, Board of Directors, A & S Chapter 



BALTIMORE 



Student and Faculty Relationships 

A SPECIAL committee was ap- 
pointed early this year for the 
first time to study our relationships 
with students and faculty members of 
the College of Arts and Sciences. 
Through the findings and recommenda- 
tions of this committee, it is hoped that 
we will be able to improve our liaison 
with these two groups and to increase 
our contributions to the academic 
growth of the University. 

Because of the diversity of occupa- 
tions and interest among graduates of 
the College of Ails and Sciences, it is 
especially important that a strong ef- 
fort be undertaken to make these in- 
dividuals "alumni conscious" before 
they receive their diplomas. This may 
be accomplished in part by increasing 
our interest and participation in stu- 
dent activities of the College and by 
inviting the students to participate in 
some of our alumni functions. By par- 
ticipating in orientation week each Fall 
and by offering awards to outstanding 
freshmen, we could help to acquaint stu- 
dents with the existence and objectives 
of the Alumni Association early in their 
college careers. By sponsoring voca- 
tional programs, scholarships and other 
forms of student aid, in cooperation 
with college officials, we could render 
invaluable services to both the students 
and the University. At the same time, 
by demonstrating our continuing inter- 
est in the students and their future 
after graduation we will be sowing the 
seeds of a stronger and more enthusi- 
astic Alumni Association. 

Teacher Recognition 

A teacher recognition program, simi- 
lar to that established by the alumni 
chapter of the College of Agriculture, 
should be given serious consideration. 
In co-operation with the dean and mem- 
bers of the faculty, an attempt should 
be made to discover why no chanter 
of Phi Beta Kappa exists at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and what improve- 
ments are needed in order to qualify 
for such a chapter. 

These are only a few of the possi- 
bilities which have been suggested in 
the field of student and faculty rela- 
tionships. It is recommended that the 
work of this committee be continued. 
Program of Activities 

In accordance with the provisions of 
the A & S constitution, a program 
committee was appointed early in the 
year "to recommend and review pro- 
grams for the chapter." This commit- 
tee was requested (1) To determine 
what the primary objectives of the Arts 
and Sciences chapter should be and to 
prepare a suggested program for at- 
taining those objectives; (2) To make 



recommendations concerning the num- 
ber and type of special events which 
our chapter should attempt to sponsor 
each year. 

Because of the poor attendance at 
last year's joint A & S - BPA spring 
rally, it was decided not to sponsor 
such an event this year. No suitable 
substitute was suggested. As a result, 
your board of directors decided it 
would be better not to hold a special 
function this year unless there was 
reasonable assurance in advance of its 
success. 

Several suggestions have been pre- 
sented for consideration next year. One 
is that an Arts and Sciences banquet 
be held at College Park featuring a 
well-known speaker. Another sugges- 
tion is that the alumni sponsor an Arts 
and Sciences Convocation at which spe- 
cial awards would be made and students 
from various departments would pre- 
sent skits in competition for prizes 
offered by the alumni. Many persons 
feel that, in order for any event of 
this type to be successful, it should be 
held on the same day as an athletic 
event or similar University attraction. 
Combined Rally 

It has been stated many times in 
these discussions that the alumni of 
the College of Arts and Sciences are 
not as unified in their interests, occu- 
pations, and sense of affiliation with 
their college as the members of most 
of the other chapters of the Alumni 
Association. While this may be true, 
the problem is not necessarily peculiar 
to our college, especially with regard 
to poor attendance at alumni functions. 
As this is written, consideration is be- 
ing given to a proposal to hold a com- 
bined rally next spring for all College 
Park alumni. If this is done, it may 
still be possible to devote at least part 
of the day to a separate A & S function. 
In addition to other attractions, the 
new Chemistry Building should be ready 
for an "open house" by that time. 

It is possible that, instead of at- 
tempting to hold rallies or other special 
events at College Park, the Arts and 
Sciences chapter could accomplish more 
by sponsoring the organization of new 
alumni clubs, helping to establish a 
creditable scholarship program, and en- 
gaging in other constructive activities 
of this type. 

I am sure that the new board of 
directors will welcome any suggestions 
you may care to offer concerning the 
type of activities or special events 
which you believe this chapter should 
undertake in the future. 

Scholarship Program 

At a meeting of the Alumni Council 
on December 14, 1950, a committee 

[27] 




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which had been appointed by the pre- 
vious year's Council presented its pre- 
liminary recommendations for a schol- 
arship program to be undertaken by 
the Alumni Association. The members 
of the Council (which includes repre- 
sentatives of all colleges and schools) 
were asked to study this report and to 
present their respective suggestions at 
the next meeting of the Council. 

This report was discussed thoroughly 
ft a meeting of the Arts and Sciences 
board of directors on January 25. A 
summary of this discussion, together 
with specific recommendations for 
amendments to the original report, was 
sent to the chairman of the Council's 
scholarship committee. 

Study Suggestions 
The next meeting of the Alumni 
Council was not held until June 15. At 
this meeting, it was announced by the 
chairman of the scholarship committee 
that the board of directors of the Col- 
lege of Arts and Sciences chapter was 
the only one which had made a full 
study of the scholarship report and 
submitted its written recommendations 
for suggested changes in the report. 
As a result, the members of the Coun- 
cil were requested to study both the 
original report and the recommenda- 
tions of the Arts and Sciences board 
and to submit their suggestions to the 
chairman of the scholarship committee. 
The committee was instructed to study 
these suggestions and present a revised 
scholarship plan at the next meeting 
of the Council. 

Meanwhile, your board of directors — 
convinced that this was probably the 
most important matter to be considered 
this year — continued to study the pro- 
posed scholarship program from all 
angles. At a meeting on August 24, the 
A & S board again reviewed the origi- 
nal report of the scholarship committee 
together with its own recommenda- 
tions. As a result of this discussion, 
the board decided to make further 
recommendations. These suggestions 
were forwarded immediately to the 
chairman of the scholarship committee. 
Revised Report 
When the Alumni Council met on 
September 7, the chairman of the schol- 
arship committee presented a revised 
report which incorporated a number 
of the recommendations submitted by 
your board of directors. However, this 
revised report was not entirely satis- 
factory to your representatives on the 
Council. Therefore, we suggested that 
several amendments be made in the 
report and that the report, as amended, 
be adopted by the Council at this meet- 
ing. After considerable discussion, the 
Council voted to defer final action on 
this report until its next meeting. In 
the meantime, the members of the 
Council were asked to submit their 
suggestions for further amendments 
to this report. 

Your representatives to the Alumni 
Council held a special meeting last 
month at which we considered the re- 
vised scholarship report and the amend- 
ments that we wished to suggest. These 
suggestions have been sent to the 
alumni secretary. 



The scholarship committee plans to 
present its final report at the Alumni 
Council meeting on November 9. It is 
our hope that the report will be ac- 
cepted at that time by the entire Coun- 
cil, making it possible for the scholar- 
ship program to get underway in the 
near future. We also hope that the 
final report will include all or most 
of the changes which have been sug- 
gested by your board of directors. 
Above all, we shall do everything in 
our power to make certain that the re- 
port which is finally adopted contains 
the following three provisions: 

1. That the administration of funds 
and the direction of this scholarship 
program shall be the responsibility of 
a committee to be appointed by and 
answerable to the Alumni Council. 

2. That all scholarships financed un- 
der this program shall be awarded on 
the dual basis of scholastic achieve- 
ment and school citizenship ( i.e.: par- 
ticipation and leadership in various 
extra-curricular activities). 

3. That, initially, all persons selected 
to receive these scholarships must be 
in need of financial assistance. 

Sesquicentennial Celebration 

At a meeting of the Alumni Council 
en June 15, it was suggested by Fred 
DeMarr, A & S vice-chairman, that 
plans be initiated as soon as possible 
for a sesquicentennial celebration to be 
held during the academic year 1956-57. 
This year will mark the 150th anni- 
versary of the establishment of the 
University's oldest college, the School 
of Medicine at Baltimore, in 1807. It 
will also be the 100th anniversary of 
the founding of the College of Agri- 
culture, first unit established at College 
Park, in 1856. 

Principal Item of Business 

This proposal was referred by the 
Council to the board of directors of 
the Arts and Sciences chapter for fur- 
ther study and recommendations. As 
a result, this matter was one of the 
principal items of business at the meet- 
ing of your board of directors on 
August 24. Recommendations growing 
out of this discussion were presented 
in a preliminary report by Fred DeMarr 
at the next meeting of the Alumni 
Council on September 7. The main sug- 
gestions of this report, which received 
the unanimous endorsement of the 
Council, were: (1) A planning commit- 
tee should be organized in the immedi- 
ate future to coordinate the activities 
of the University, the alumni, and the 
student body in connection with this 
celebration. (2) A timetable should 
b»^ established in the near future so that 
planning for this celebration can pro- 
ceed in a logical and orderly manner 
during the next five years. (3) The 
actual celebration should be under the 
direction of a full-time chairman who 
would serve as an assistant to the 
president of the University. 

These recommendations have been 
forwarded by the Council to the Uni- 
versity's Board of Regents for their 
consideration. It is our hope that this 
proposal will be considered favorably 
and that planning will proceed for a 
dignified celebration which will reflect 



[28] 



credit upon the University, its alumni, 
and the student body. We also hope 
that, by the time of this celebration, 
the proposed scholarship program will 
be in full operation. If this proves to 
be the case, the alumni of the College 
of Arts and Sciences can take pride in 
the knowledge that their board of di- 
rectors has played a major role in the 
development of both of these projects. 

I would like to take this opportunity 
to express my personal appreciation to 
the other members of the board of 
directors for their cooperation and sup- 
port during the past year. I would 
especially like to thank vice-chairman 
Fred DeMarr and Loy Shipp, who have 
loyally assisted me in representing 
your chapter on the Alumni Council. 
And, of course, this report would not 
be complete without a word of appreci- 
ation to Dave Brigham for the enthusi- 
asm, suggestions, and active assistance 
which he has contributed throughout 
the year. 

It has been a privilege to serve you. 

Dr. M. H. Martin 

Dr. M. H. Martin, member of the 
Institute for Fluid Dynamics and Ap- 
plied Mathematics and Head of the 
Department of Mathematics, has been 
appointed a member of the advisory 
committee on Fulbright Fellowships of 
the National Research Council. 

Aid Army 

The Department of Psychology has 
accepted a new research contract with 
the Army Medical Service to investigate 
measurements of decrements of be- 
havior under conditions of fatigue and 
stress. Alan M. Kershner and Murray 
G. Mitts are serving as Research As- 
sociates on military research contract. 

Charles N. Cofer 
Charles N. Cofer has been promoted 
to the rank of Professor of Psychology. 

At Camp Pickett 

Major Kenneth R. Mason (A&S '36) 
commands the 330th Ordnance Battalion 
at Pamp Pickett, Va. 

Phi Delta Theta, he was executive 
president of the Mason Canning Com- 
pany, Pocomoke City, before re-enlist- 
ing in the service last March. 

Major Mason, who saw service in the 
European and American Theatres of 
Operations, is married to the former 
Alicia E. Estess of Snow Hill. They 
have two children. 

In Navy 

Lt. Cdr. John Downin, '37, writes to 
tell us that he is now in the regular 
Navy, stationed at third Naval District 
Headquarters in New York. His ad- 
dress is 23 Primrose Place, New Dorp, 
L. I. 6, New York. Jack would like to 
hear from any of his friends or to have 
a visit from those who might be in the 
vicinity or passing through. He is a 
member of the "M" club, and at Mary- 
land was active in "Latch Key," Persh- 
ing Rifles, and the Rossborough Club. 



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partment of Health. He surveyed the 
progress of a research program con- 
ducted during the last three years on 
The Neisseria, a group of bacteria of 
public health significance. 
In New York 

Chemistry alumni held a theatre 
party in New York in connection with 
the Diamond Jubilee meeting of the 
American Chemical Society. Attending 
Two on the Aisle were Dr. and Mrs. 
William Stanton, Dr. and Mrs. John 
Yourtee, Dr. and Mrs. Giles Cook, Dr. 
and Mrs. Ed Young, Dr. Bert Anspon, 
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Spies, and Dr. and 
Mrs. Charles E. White. Dr. Fred 
Darkis, Class of 1922, presided at a 
symposium on the Chemistry of To- 
bacco at the American Chemical Society 
meeting. 

In Columbus, Ohio 

Fred L. Carpentar '28 has been ap- 
pointed Manager of Montgomery Ward 
and Company's Columbus, Ohio store. 
For the past five and a half years he 
had been manager of the store at 
Morgantown, West Virginia. He began 
as a stock boy over twenty-three years 
ago following his graduation. 
In New York 

Miriam B. Eckard who received her 
Bachelor's degree in '46 and a Master's 
in '48 has entered Union Theological 
Seminary in New York City, working 
for a Bachelor of Divinity degree. 
Maril Exhibit 

Paintings by Herman Maril, Assis- 
tant Professor of Art and nationally 
known American painter, were featured 
for six weeks at the Barnett-Aden Gal- 
lery in Washington. 

Entitled "1931-1951," the exhibition 
displayed works done by Mr. Maril dur- 
ing the last twenty years. Many of 
these paintings were on loan from mu- 
seums and private collectors. 
Colonel - Chaplain 

Alumnus Cecil L. Propst, (A & S. '27, 
majoring in English), has just been 
promoted to the rank of full Colonel in 
the Army Chaplain Corps. 

Colonel Propst, a veteran of nearly 
every major European campaign of the 
last war, is at Lackland Air Base, 
Texas. 

Chaplain Propst began his military 
career while a student at Maryland 
where he was a member of the ROTC. 
He graduated with a reserve commis- 
sion as second lieutenant in the infan- 
try. 



He gave up his commission to serve 
in the chaplaincy, and went on active 
status with the 9th Infantry Division 
in August of 1940. 

African Invasion 

He landed on the coast of Africa 
with the 9th Infantry Division and was 
with that unit in the Sicilian invasion. 
He was promoted to Major shortly 
thereafter. 

At the end of the Sicilian campaign, 
Chaplain Propst with the fighting 9th 
was sent to Winchester, England, for 
a well earned rest. Here he received 
his promotion to Major. In 1944, four 
days after D-Day, Chaplain Propst, 
still attached to the 9th Infantry Di- 
vision, went ashore with the invasion 
forces at Utah beach in France. 

His unit fought its way across North- 
ern France and into Belgium where it 
was engaged in the Battle of the 
Bulge. The chaplain was with the first 
forces to cross the Rhine River over 
the Ludendorf bridge at Remagen, Ger- 
many. 

His outfit, a part of the First Army, 
joined forces with the Russian forces 
at the Elbe and the end of hostilities 
came while the chaplain's unit was in 
the village of Torgau, the meeting point 
for the armies. 

Decorations 

Among his many decorations are: the 
Legion of Merit, awarded him in 
Africa; the Bronze Star, for his action 
in Germany, and the Belgian Fourra- 
gere. 

He also received the ETO ribbon with 
eight battle stars and the arrowhead, 
the American Defense and Theater rib- 
bons and the Army of Occupation 
ribbon. 




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[30] 




•' f 




MARYLANDER IN JAPAN 

Lieutenant Samuel Weiss, (left) who attended the University of Maryland and is now biochemist 
of the 382nd General Hospital, near Osaka, Japan, is shown here with Major General George W. 
Armstrong, (center) Surgeon General of the Army, and Dr. George W. Fish, civilian consultant on 
Urology, and members of the 382nd General Hospital staff. 

General Armstrong and Dr. Fish visited the 382nd General Hospital while on a tour of Medical 
Installations in the Far East. 



S^cnool of- 

PHARMACY 

By Joseph Cohen '29 



Registration 

THE School of Pharmacy opened 
with an attendance of 290 stu- 
dents, including 70 new students and 
32 graduate students. 

The graduate students enjoying grants 
from the American Foundation for 
Pharmaceutical Education are: Andrew 
Bartilucci, whose grants have been re- 
newed for 1951-52; and William Mohn 
Heller and John B. Ward, who have 
been selected as new appointees to these 
fellowships. John B. Ward received 
the B. S. in Pharmacy from Rutgers 
University and attended Purdue Uni- 
versity during 1950-51. William Mohn 
Heller received the B. S. in Pharmacy 
from the University of Toledo and the 
M. S. degree from Maryland. 

New Faculty 

The new assistants on the staff of 
the School of Pharmacy for 1951-52 
are: Elmer Curtis Koller, Jr., and Lud- 
mila Kregiel-Stass in Pharmacy; Gor- 
don Henry Bryan and William Homer 
Lawrence in Pharmacology; Wilfred H. 
Gluckstern in Pharmacognosy; Marvin 
J. Chertkoff, Carl Kaiser and Bernard 
Misek in Chemistry; Ernest Charles 
Merkel in Bacteriology and Frank J. 
Sinnreich in Zoology. 

Backgrounds 

Marvin J. Chertkoff, Wilfred H. 
Gluckstern, Carl Kaiser and Elmer Cur- 
tis Koller received the B. S. in Pharmacy 
from Maryland; Ludmila Kregiel-Stass 
received the Ph. D. from Maryland; 
Goi-don Henry Bryan, a former assis- 
tant in pharmacology, then taught at 



the Montana State University, has re- 
turned to the School of Pharmacy as 
an assistant in Pharmacology and will 
work for the Ph. D. degree; William 
Homer Lawrence received the B. S. in 
Pharmacy from the College of Ozarks 
in 1950; Ernest Charles Merkel, Jr., re- 
ceived the B. S. degree from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, College Park, as 
did also Frank J. Sinnreich; and Ber- 
nard Misek received the B. S. in Phar- 
macy from Columbia University. 

New Fields 

Findlay A. Morrison has completed 
the work for the M. S. degree at the 
School of Pharmacy and returned to 
his former position as Assistant Pro- 
fessor of Pharmacy at the University 
of British Columbia; Herman Morris 
Mupsik, a graduate student in the 
School of Pharmacy working for the 
Ph. D. degree, has accepted a position 
in the Chemistry Department of the 
University of British Columbia; Ken- 
neth H. Stahl, former Instructor in 
Chemistry in the School of Pharmacy, 
has completed the work for the Ph. D. 
degree and is now associated with the 
Detroit Institute of Technology, as is 
also Helen Viola Reed, who completed 
the work for the M. S. degree; Wei-Chin 
Liu who was a graduate student under a 
fellowship in Pharmaceutical Chemistry 
from the Bristol Laboratories, Inc., has 
accepted a position with the Southern 
College of Pharmacy; Robert Isadore 
Ellin who received the Ph. D. degree 
from Maryland in 1950, has accepted a 
position as Professor of Pharmaceutical 
Chemistry at the Rhode Island College 
of Pharmacy and Allied Sciences. 

In Buffalo 

Members of the Faculty of the School 
of Pharmacy attending the meetings of 
the American Association of Colleges 
of Pharmacy, the American Pharma- 
ceutical Association, and allied groups, 
included Dean Noel E. Foss, B. Olive 
Cole, George P. Hager, Donald E. Shay, 
Benjamin F. Allen, Frank J. Slama, 



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CLASS 1933 

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HEADS PHARMACISTS 

Miss B. Olive Cole, pictured above, honored by 
colleagues. 



Francis S. Balassone and W. Arthur 
Furdum. Buffalo, N. Y., was head- 
quarters for the meetings of the dif- 
ferent groups. 

Graduates of the School of Pharmacy 
held an informal luncheon in Buffalo. 
This luncheon was attended by gradu- 
ates from distant parts of the country, 
who were happy to exchange greetings 
and views on current topics in phar- 
macy. 

Unusual Distinction 

The recent selection of Miss B. Olive 
Cole as the Honorary President of the 
Maryland Pharmaceutical Association 
for 1951-52 is unique in the history of 
the group, inasmuch as Miss Cole is 
the first woman to be so honored. 

This was a wise selection and an 
honor well placed. 

Through her activities as an instruc- 
tor, and acting Dean at the School of 
Pharmacy, Miss Cole is well informed 
as to matters pertaining to pharmacy. 
Her opinions are frequently sought, 
looking for the betterment of pharmacy 
and while the position she will assume 
during the coming year is honorary, 
we who know her well, will be looking 
forward to many valuable suggestions. 

In Appreciation 

By B. Olive Cole '13 

The American Foundation for Phar- 
maceutical Education was established 
in 1942. The Foundation solicits funds 
from wholesale druggists, chain drug 
stores, pharmaceutical manufacturers 
and others interested in pharmaceutical 
education and the advancement of the 
profession of pharmacy, and has re- 
ceived, within less than a decade, over 
one million dollars. 

Dr. H. A. B. Dunning of Baltimore, 
graduate of Maryland School of Phar- 
macy, is vice-president of the Founda- 
tion, and Dr. W. Paul Briggs, who re- 
ceived the M. S. degree from the Gradu- 
ate School of the University of Mary- 
land, is secretary and executive direc- 
tor of the Foundation. Other graduates 




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[32] 



of the School of Pharmacy who are 
associated with the Foundation are Dr. 
R. L. Swain, editor of Drug Topics, as 
a director, and Dr. L. M. Kantner, rep- 
lesenting the National Association of 
Boards of Pharmacy, as a member. 

The Foundation has established 
graduate fellowships and undergradu- 
ate scholarships in many schools of 
pharmacy. In providing funds for 
undergraduate scholarships the Foun- 
dation will contribute $400.00, which 
must be matched by an equal amount 
by the school of pharmacy interested 
in receiving funds for scholarships. 
Since 1946 the School of Pharmacy has 
contributed $1200.00 to the scholarship 
fund through gifts from the Alumni 
Association and an alumnus. During 
that time awards have been made to 
twelve students who were in need of 
assistance in paying tuition fees and 
who ranked in the upper quarter of 
their class. The present incumbents 
receiving these awards are: Richard I. 
Levin, Jo Anne Sandbower and Charles 
I. Swartz. 

The fellowships carry an annual sti- 
pend of from $1000.00 to $1500.00 for 
full-time study, plus an allowance up 
to $500.00 for tuition, fees and supplies 
for graduate students not receiving 
G.I. benefits. Since 1947 twenty gradu- 
ate students in the School of Pharmacy 
have been the recipients of these fellow- 
ships, the present students enjoying 
these benefits being: Andrew Bartilucci 
(renewal), Jacob S. Hanker (renewal), 
William Mohn Heller and John B. 
Ward. Mr. Bartilucci, Mr. Heller and 
Mr. Ward are majoring in pharmacy 
and Mr. Hanker in pharmaceutical 
chemistry. 

From funds provided by the Ameri- 
can Foundation for Pharmaceutical 
Education 141 fellows have completed 
their graduate training and 69 of these 
are engaged in teaching in colleges of 
pharmacy. Other fellows are engaged 
in industrial activities, mainly in re- 
search, development and control labora- 
tories. More than 700 foundation schol- 
ars are now practicing pharmacy or 
serving in closely related fields. 

In addition to sponsoring graduate 
fellowships and undergraduate scholar- 
ships, the Foundation supported the 
work of the American Council on Phar- 
maceutical Education, which is the ac- 
creditation agency for colleges of phar- 
macy. The School of Pharmacy of the 
University of Maryland has been ac- 
credited by this Council as a Class A 
School. 

The American Journal of Pharma- 
ceutical Education, a quarterly publi- 
cation of the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy, is another 
project which receives support from 
funds from the Foundation. 

The national study of pharmacy by 
the American Council on Education, 
which was concluded in 1949, was 
financed by the Foundation, at a cost 
of nearly $200,000. This Pharmaceuti- 
cal Survey revealed vital data on all 
areas of pharmacy, but more especially 
the strengths and weaknesses of phar- 
macy education. From this study many 
row and progressive developments will 



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occur in pharmaceutical education and 
in the practice of pharmacy. 

The last three summers the Founda- 
tion has supported under the super- 
vision of the American Association of 
Colleges of Pharmacy, seminars in- 
tended to improve and stimulate teach- 
ing in colleges of pharmacy. The Semi- 
nar for teachers in Pharmacy was held 
at the University of Wisconsin in 1949; 
that for teachers in Pharmacy Adminis- 
tration at the Ohio State University in 
1950; and the one for teachers in Phar- 
macology at Purdue University in 1951. 

When one considers the many phases 
of assistance rendered by the Founda- 
tion scholarships and fellowships for 
students; the assitance given the publi- 
cation of the Journal of Pharmaceuti- 
cal Education; the assistance rendered 
the American Council on Pharmaceuti- 
cal Education in the accreditation of 
colleges of pharmacy, as well as the 
financing of the Pharmaceutical Survey 
through the American Council on Edu- 
cation — the profession of pharmacy 
has reason to be grateful that such an 
organization exists and should take an 
interest in the work of the American 



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Madge:- '"You mean he graduated from the 
School of Pharmacy and couldn't hold a job in 
Teoples Drug Store?" 

Midge:- "That is right. To hold it he had to 
take graduate work in Home Ec because he 
didn't know how to make a peanut butter and 
lettuce sandwich." 



"WHERRYISMS" 

Senator Wherry of Nebraska, Senate 
Republican floor leader, gets so excited 
in debate that his words get tangled 
up with his thoughts. The result: 
"Some Wherryisms," so unique that the 
boys in the press gallery have jotted 
them down. Among them: 

"The anti-Sherman trust law" for 
the Sherman anti-trust law. 

"Chiefs of the Chief Joints of Staff" 
for Chief of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 

"Indigo-China" for Indo China. 

"Senator from Junior Oregon" for 
the junior Senator from Oregon. 

"The Senator from Holland" for Sen- 
ator Holland of Florida. 

"I hope the final opinion is not his 
permanent final opinion." 

"It is my unanimous opinion." 



[33] 



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Atkinson — Scott 

nOROTHY G. SCOTT and Edward 
E. Atkinson. 

the biide attended Western Maryland 
College and her husband attended Penn 
State and Maryland. 

Bennett — Whitehurst 

Joan Wilson Whitehurst and Donald 
Vinton Bennett, Jr. 

The newlyweds are students at Mary- 
land. 

Boucher — Abernathy 

Arie E. Abernathy and Capt. L. H. 
Boucher. 

The bride, a grad of the University 
ol Alabama, served with the American 
Bed Cross in Europe and later, occupied 
Japan. The bridegroom, who attended 
New England School of Art and Mary- 
land, served in Europe during World 
War II as a pilot. 

Bowen — Jarvis 

Margaret Eileen Jarvis became the 
bride of Earl W. Bowen. 

Mrs. Bowen graduated from Notre 
Dame Academy and attended Maryland. 
Mr. Bowen is an alumnus of Maryland. 
Young — Butler 

Pearce Butler and Donald Gregory 
Young. 

The former Miss Butler attended 
Holton Arms and graduated from 
Honeywell Foundation. 

Mr. Young was graduated from 
Bullis Preparatory School and attended 
Maryland. 

Channing — de Arcos 

Maria Leanor de Arcos and James 
Faulkner Channing. 

The bride was educated in a convent 
school and then attended the Universi- 
dad Nacional de Mexico. 

Mr. Channing is an alumnus of Mary- 
land. During World War II, he was 
wounded while serving with the 9th 
Division. 

Chiswell — Knox 

Jean Daingerfield Knox, and Maurice 
Waters Chiswell. 

A reception was held at Alpha Delta 
Pi of which the bride was president, 
this past year. The groom is also a 
graduate of Maryland, Sigma Phi Ep- 
silon. 

Clough— Kelly 

Miss Patricia Ann Kelly and David 
Gray Clough. 

Mr. Clough is a student at Maryland; 
Sigma Chi. 

Cormack — Allen 

Margaret Annette Allen and Warren 
Ernest Cormack. 

Mrs. Cormack attended Maryland. 
Mr. Cormack, who saw action with the 
Navy in World War II, is a graduate 
of Bowdoin College. 



Einhorn — Brach 

Lucille Patricia Brach and Dr 
uel G. Einhorn. 

The bride is an alumna of Montclair 
State Teachers College and received a 
Master's degree from New York Uni- 
versity. Dr. Einhorn graduated from 
Maryland's College of Medicine. 
Freeman — Johnson 

Lois Tanya Johnson and James Wil- 
liam Freeman. 

Both bride and bridegroom attended 
Maryland. The bridegroom will return 
to the University after his release from 
the United States Army. 

From — Havenner 

Rosemary Louise Havenner and 
Thomas Pennington From. 

Miss Havenner is a graduate of 
Maryland; Alpha Delta Pi. The groom- 
elect attended the University of Missis- 
sippi; Alpha Tau Omega. He also at- 
tended Maryland and is now at the 
University of Georgia; Alpha Psi Vet- 
erinary. 

Fussell — Becker 

Margaret Rose Becker and Willis 
Fussell, Jr. 

Both bride and bridegroom attended 
Maryland. 

Gerachis — Vlahos 

Mary Ann Vlahos and Platou 
Gerachis. 

The bridegroom is completing 
studies at Maryland. 

Golden — Fitzgerald 

Marjorie Gwynedd Fitzgerald 
Edward E. Golden, Jr. 

The Goldens will continue their 
studies, the bride at Maryland and her 
husband at Georgetown University Den- 
tal School. 

Herman — Lillie 

Ida Amelia Lillie and Dr. Herbert 
Herman. 

The bride is a graduate of Maryland. 
She served in the United States Marine 
Corps for two years. Dr. Herman at- 
tended New York University and Uni- 
versity of Lausanne, Switzerland. 
Hoy-Widmayer 

Rita L. Widmayer and Mr. Edward J. 
Hoy, Jr. 

Both the bride and her husband are 
graduates of Montgomery Blair High 
School and Maryland. 

Hurley— Wyatt 

Charlotte Elizabeth Wyatt and Her- 
bert Elmer Hurley, Jr. 

Mr. Hurley is now enrolled at Mary- 
land. 

Jurkiewicz — Freeman 

Mary de Forest Freeman and Dr. 
Maurice J. Jurkiewicz. 

The bridegroom graduated from 
Maryland's Dental School. 
Kahan — Mandel 

Carolyn Mandel and Edwin Louis 
Kahan. 

Mr. Kahan is a student at Maryland. 



L. 



his 



and 



[34] 



Keith — Penrose 

Carol A. Penrose and Jefferson Don- 
ald Keith. 

The bride, Alpha Omicron Pi, and 
groom are attending Maryland. 
K indness — Hosman 

•Anre GifFord Hosman and Thomas 
N. Kindness. 

The bride is a student at Maryland 
and the bridegroom attends George 
Washington University Law School. 
Levin — Silverman 

Jane Ann Silverman and Harry L. 
Levin, son of Mr. and Mrs. S. M. Levin 
of Brookline. Miss Silverman was 
graduated from the University of Mary- 
land and Mr. Levin was graduated from 
Colby College. 

Marsh — Evers 

Margaret Anne Evers, and Burrell 
Hyde Marsh, 3rd. 

The bride attended Maryland Kappa 
Delta. Mr. Marsh was graduated from 
Augusta Military Academy, and Gen- 
eral Motors Institute of Technology. 
Marshall — Jarvis 

Joyce V. Jarvis and Robert A. Mar- 
shall. 

The bride attended Maryland, and 
the bridegroom the University of Vir- 
ginia. 

Martin — Lindsay 

Joyce Marie Lindsay and James 
Lawrence Martin. 

Mr. Martin will receive a B.S. degree 
fi'om Maryland in February. 
McCarty — McCabe 

Sheila McCabe and Terrence Jerome 
McCarty. 

The bride is a grad of Georgetown 
Visitation Junior College. The bride- 
groom, a veteran of World War II is a 
senior at Maryland. 

Medairy — Coakley 

Margaret Lucille Coakley and Mark 
Curtis Medairy. 

The bride is a graduate of the Havre 
c?e Grace High School and the Nurses' 
Training School of Mercy Hospital. The 
groom is a graduate of Maryland, and 
is attending the U. of M. Law School. 
Moran — Huebl 

Sara Anne Huebl to Lt. (jg) Thos. 
L. Moran. 

The bride attended Maryland; the 
groom Vermont, Naval Academy and 
M.I.T. 

Odell — Houghland 

Nancy Marie Houghland and John 
Arthur Odell. 

The groom will continue his studies 
at Maryland. 

Peregoy — Collins 

Anna Marie Collins and Chester A. 
Peregoy, Jr. The bride and groom 
graduated from Maryland. He's a Sig- 
ma Nu. 

Prentice — Siemons 

Jean Siemons and Kenneth William 
Prentice. 

Mrs. Prentice is a graduate of Mary- 
land and her husband is attending the 
Maryland Dental School. 

Pritchard — Bowman 

Barbara Marie Bowman and Thomas 
Howard Pritchard. 

Mrs. Pritchard attended Mary Wash- 
ington College and is now studying at 
Maryland, Delta Gamma. Mr. Pritchard, 
also a student at Maryland, Phi Delta 
Theta. 




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Scolnik — Revitz 

Paula Revitz and Louis Scolnik. 

The bride is a grad of Maryland and 
has done graduate work at George 
Washington University. Mr. Scolnik, 
a graduate of Bates College, is now at- 
tending Georgetown University Law 
School. 

Siems — Porter 

Mary Virginia Porter and Leonard 
Arnold Siems, Jr. 

The bride is a graduate of Randolph 
Macon Woman's College. Mr. Siems 
graduated from Maryland. 

Smith— Rich 

Betty Jane Rich and Wallace Phillips 
Smith, Jr. 

The bride was graduated from Amer- 
ican University, Alpha Chi Omega. Mr. 
Smith is studying at Maryland. 

Somerville — Crittenton 

Candace Crittenton and Andrew Som- 
erville, Jr. 

Both are seniors at Maryland. 

Spangle — Galliher 

Virginia Hope Galliher and Clarence 
Wilbur Spangle. 

Mrs. Spangle is a graduate of Mary- 
land. Mr. Spangle is an alumnus of 
Yale. 

Tall — Davies 

Jane Seuel Davies and Robert Eu- 
gene Tall. 

The bride and bridegroom graduated 
from Maryland. Mrs. Tall attended 
Holton-Arms, and her husband, the 
McDonogh School, Baltimore. 

Tyler — Vanderschaaf 

Betty Lou Vanderschaaf and Spur- 
geon S. Tyler. 

The bride is a graduate of Maryland. 
Her husband is also an alumnus of 
Maryland. 

Waltz — Baumann 

Carolyn Sue Baumann became the 
bride of Bruce W. Waltz. 

Mrs. Waltz was graduated from St. 
Mary's Seminary and Maryland; Gam- 
ma Phi Beta sorority. Mr. Waltz grad- 
uated from Lehigh; Kappa Sigma. 

Ward — Stephens 

Laura Stephens and Lincoln Ward, 
Jr. 

The bride attended business school 
in Washington and the groom attended 
Maryland. 

Weber — K ipke 

Teresa L. Kipke and Daniel James 
Weber. 

The former Miss Kipke is employed 
at Fort Meade. Mr. Weber, an elec- 
trical engineer, is attending Maryland. 

Wetmore — Dellett 

Elizabeth Ross Dellett and George 
Badger Wetmore. 

Both attended Maryland. The bride- 
groom will return to complete his stud- 
ies in Engineering. The bride is a 
grad of Education. 

Young — Hines 

Margaret Evelyn Hines and Thomas 
Gordon Young. 

Mrs. Young attended Maryland and 
her husband attended Catholic Univer- 
sity of America. 



[36] 




(_/« ZJneir ^xi 



inaeri 



Bennehoff — Messick 

ANN MERRILL BENNEHOFF to 
Carter D. Messick, Jr. The groom 
graduated from Maryland, the bride 
from San Diego State. 

Brody — Baker 

Beverly Brody to David Baker. 

Miss Brody is a graduate of Mary- 
land. Her fiance was graduated from 
the Illinois Institute of Technology and 
Graduate School of Design of Harvard 
University. 

Bull — Murray 

Carole Elizabeth Bull to Richard C. 
Murray. 

Miss Bull attends McCoy College. 
Mr. Murray is in his last year at Mary- 
land's Law School. 

Burke — Forris 

Jan Louise Burke to Stephen Charles 
Forris. 

Miss Burke attended Maryland and 
Mr. Forris is with the Maryland Pub- 
licity Department. 

Cheek — Ross 

Phyllis Cheek to David Ross. Miss 
Cheek is a student at Maryland, Kappa 
Delta. Mr. Ross attended Maryland, 
Sigma Chi, and is now studying law 
at the university's law school. 
Coppel — Kundin 

Mollee Coppel to William Daniel 
Kundin. Miss Coppel is a '50 graduate 
of Maryland; a Pi Delta Epsilon and 
Mortar Board. Mr. Kundin, also a 
Maryland graduate; Pi Delta Epsilon, 
Phi Eta Sigma, and Sigma Alpha Omi- 
cron. 

Creed — Nau 

Virginia Mary Creed to Gustav V. 
Nau. 

Miss Creed graduated from the Ursu- 
line School, LeHavre, France, and from 
Carmelite College, Zumaya, Spain. 

She obtained her A. B. degree from 
the University of Tulsa and has done 
graduate work at the University of 
Mexico and Maryland. 

Dalton — Mather 

Nancy Louise Dalton to Richard In- 
crease Mather. 

Miss Dalton attended the Overseas 
Branch of Maryland University. 
Dietzel — Hansen 

Joan Margaret Dietzel to William C. 
Hansen. 

Miss Dietzel is a graduate of Im- 
maculata Junior College and Mr. Han- 
sen graduated from Maryland; Phi Sig- 
ma Kappa. 

Dirst — Chaudet 

Barbara Jeanne Dirst to Norman L. 
Chaudet. 

The bride-elect is a student at Mary- 
land where her finance is a senior. 
Edrington — Holbrook 

Noel Carol Edrington to Dr. William 
Addison Holbrook, Jr. 

Miss Edrington is a graduate of 
Maryland; Kappa Kappa Gamma. Dr. 
Holbrook, also a graduate of Maryland, 
Sigma Nu and Omicron Delta Kappa, 
received his degree from the univer- 
sity's medical school in 1948. He served 
for two years in Germany. 



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Estrain — Winer 

Jacqueline Estrain to Marvin S. 
Winer, a graduate of Maryland; Phi 
Alpha. 

Fink — Shantz 

Henrietta B. Fink to Irving Shantz. 

Miss Fink attended Maryland, Ohio 
State, and Strayers Business College. 
Mr. Shantz received a degree from 
New York University and is now at- 
tending Maryland. 

Goldberg— Kal 

Harriet Goldberg to Wynn J. Kal. 

The bride-elect attended National 
Academy of Fine and Applied Arts, 
New York. Mr. Kal attended Maryland. 

Gordon — White 

Zara Gordon to Dr. Albert B. White. 

Miss Gordon is a graduate of Mary- 
land. Dr. White attended Randolph 
Macon College and graduated from the 
Medical College of Virginia. 

Greathouse — Minnick 

Rosemary Greathouse to Mr. G. Rich- 
ard Minnick. 

Miss Greathouse is a senior at Mary- 
land; Gamma Sigma. Her fiance at- 
tends the Maryland Dental School at 
Baltimore; Psi Omega. 

Haines — Fulton 

Helene Pearl Haines to David Robert 
Fulton. 

Miss Haines and Mr. Fulton attended 
Maryland. The wedding is planned for 
early February. 

Kilby— White 

Phyllis Geraldine Kilbv, to Dr. John 
Phillips White 3d. 

Miss Kilby is a senior at the Mary- 
land School of Nursing. 

Dr. White attended Johns Hopkins 
University and graduated from the 
Maryland School of Medicine 

McCamon — Wyatt 

Patricia Ann McCamon to Midship- 
man William Wyatt. 

Miss McCamon, Delta, Delta, Delta, 
attended Florida State, Milwaukee 
Downer, and is now at Maryland. 

A war-time Marine, Midshipman 
Wyatt entered the Naval academy 
in '48. 

Miller— Barnett 

Morrine Joyce Miller to Elliot Ches- 
ter Barnett. 

Miss Miller is attending Maryland, 
and the groom-elect is a student at 
Yale. 

Miller — Jones 

Jean Iris Miller to Robert William 
Jones. 

Miss Miller is a graduate of Mary- 
land; Kappa Delta. 

Mr. Jones attended American Uni- 
versity and Virginia. 

Newton — Muller 

Terry Newton to Raymond Carl 
Muller. 

Miss Newton is a graduate of Mary- 
vood School for Girls. Mr. Muller is 
a graduate of Maryland and George 
Washington University Law School. 

O'Brien — Meier 

Patricia O'Brien to Frederick Meier. 

The bride-elect attended Montgomery 
Junior College. Her fiance graduated 
from Maryland. 



[38] 



Payne — Leonard 

Orris Howard Payne to Robert B. 
Leonard. 

Mr. Leonard attended Maryland. Miss 
Payne, West Liberty State. 

Reiskin — Cummings 

Marilyn Reiskin to Ralph H. Cum- 
mings. 

Miss Reiskin is a graduate of Mary- 
land. 

Rorer — O'Conor 

Dana Eugenia Rorer to Edward 
Chapman O'Conor. 

The bride-elect was graduated from 
Holy Cross Academy and attended 
Barry College in Miami. Mr. O'Conor, 
now in the Army, is a graduate of 
Archmere Academy, Del., and attended 
Maryland. 

Ruark — Jump 

Dorothy Lee Ruark to G. Lawson 
Jump. 

Both Miss Ruark; Pi Beta Phi, and 
Mr. Jump; Phi Kappa Sigma and Omi- 
cron Delta Kappa, are seniors at Mary- 
land. 

Shook — De Francisci 

Geraldine Shook to Christopher De 
Francisci. 

Miss Shook graduated from the Gar- 
field Memorial Hospital School of Nurs- 
ing. Mr. De Francisci is a grad of 
Maryland. 

Stewart — Clifford 

Patsy Ann Stewart to Rex Clifford. 

Miss Stewart attended Mary Baldwin 
College and Mr. Clifford is now at- 
tending Maryland. 

Werlin — Yavner 

Ruth Werlin to Dr. Murray Yavner. 

Mr. Yavner graduated from Mary- 
land's Dental School, and served as 
a captain in the U. S. Dental Corps 
during World War II. 




66^10NGRATULATI0NS, writes 
% j Monk Mier, (Md. '43), 17 E. 
Peter St., Uniontown, Pa., "on Mary- 
land, our alumni publication. It is 
the best." 

Charles E. Prince, '44 Agriculture, 
writes the family has moved from Fair- 
banks, Alaska to St. Albans, Vermont. 
"We certainly do not wish to miss even 
one copy of Maryand, a great alumni 
magazine." 



FOR HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS 

The University's new prospectus, a 
32 page illustrated book designed to 
interest high school graduates in a 
university education, is just off the 
presses. Copies may be obtained by 
writing to the Director of Publications, 
Department 1B14, University of Mary- 
land, College Park. 



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[39] 




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®apa 



William S. Moore, D.D.S. 



ILLIAM S. MOORE, College 
Park dentist, died in Hyatts- 



w 

ville. 

Born in New York City, April 10, 
1883, he was graduated from George 
Washington and received his dental de- 
gree from Maryland. He had lived in 
the Washington area most of his life. 
He was a member of the Kiwanis club 
and the Maryland Dental society. 

Only survivor is a sister, Miss Clara 
E. Moore, College Park. 

Mrs. Anna E. F. Allen 

Mrs. Anna Eleanor Frances Allen, 59, 
died at Hyattsville. 

Mrs. Allen, who had served as secre- 
tary to the Director of University of 



Maryland Extension Service, was a 
Past President of the Maryland Federa- 
tion of Women's Clubs and from Prince 
Georges county was active with the 
Southeastern council of the General 
Federation of Women's Clubs of the 
United States. 

She also was a founder and grand re- 
gent of Court Prince Georges, Catholic 
Daughters of America No. 1340, was a 
vice regent of the Maryland State Court 
of the Catholic Daughters of America, 
and served at one time as secretary to 
the director of the Maryland Univer- 
sity. During World War I she worked 
as a secretary for the government unit 
charged with returning hospitalized 
veterans to this country. 

Her husband, Randolph S. Allen, a 
daughter, Mrs. Kathleen Riley, two sis- 
ters, Mrs. Lucy McCarthy and Mrs. 
Laura Clara, and two grandsons, sur- 
vive. 

Lt. Ernest A. Coblentz 

Lt. Ernest Arthur Coblentz, '51, was 
killed in action in Korea on Septem- 
ber 17. 

Lt. Coblentz entered the University 
in the fall of 1946 and graduated last 
February. He was commissioned a sec- 
ond lieutenant in the Marines upon 
completion of the last ground force 
ROTC course offered at Maryland. 

He served two years with the Marine 
Corps during World War II, and was 
a member of the Marine Reserve while 
at Maryland. 

Lt. Coblentz was active on University 
publications and in Military activities. 
He was advertising and business mana- 
ger of the Diamondback, military editor 
of The Terrapin, and Drum Major of 
the band. 

He was a member of Alpha Alpha 
social fraternity as well as Pi Delta 
Epsilon, national journalism honorary 
and Scabbard and Blade, ROTC mili- 
tary honorary. 

Col. A. D. Tuttle 

Col. A. D. Tuttle, (Ag. '16), retired 
medical director of United Air Lines 
and a pioneer in medical research as 
) elated to commercial air transporta- 
tion, recently died suddenly at Chicago, 
following a heart attack. He was 71 
years old. 

Colonel Tuttle served in World War I 
as a member of Gen John J. Pershing's 
staff in France. Later, he supervised 
reorganization of the 
Army Medical De- 
partment and from 
1934 to 1937 served 
as commandant of 
the Army School of 
Medicine, Randolph 
Field, Tex. 

He joined United 
Air Lines in 1937 to 
establish the first 
fully equipped air- 
line medical depart- 
ment in this country. 
Colonel Tuttle held the Distinguished 
Service Medal, French Legion of Honor 
and Belgian Order of Leopold. He re- 




lolonel Tuttle 



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EVERY KIND OF INSURANCE 

110 W. Patrick St. • Frederick, Md. 



ceived the 1949 John Jeffries award of 
the Institute of Aeronautical Sciences 
and the 1950 alumni award of the 
Maryland Medical Alumni Association. 



[40] 



A native of Baltimore, he is survived 
by his wife, who resides in Chicago, 
and a daughter, Mrs. George Harper 
of Bermuda. Interment was at Arling- 
ton National Cemetery. 

Frank S. Hoffecker, Jr. 

Marine Major Frank S. Hoffecker, Jr., 
of Sparrows Point (Education '35), ex- 
ecutive officer of the "Jet Cats" squad- 
ron in Korea, was killed during an 
attack on Communist frontline posi- 
tions. 

Major Hoffecker, who was with Re- 



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public Steel Corporation in Akron, O., 
until he was recalled to active duty 
last fall, was commanding officer of 
Northern Ohio's famed "Ace of Spades" 
Marine fighter squadron, heading the 
Akron stationed VFM-231 reserve unit. 

The 35-year-old pilot was going in 
for the third time to dump napalm 
bombs on the target when he was 
killed. He was in a low run toward 
the Red-held hills when one of the 
pilots saw smoke coming from his 
plane. 

"You're on fire, you're on fire," the 
pilot shouted to Major Hoffecker over 
the radio. There was no answer, and 
seconds later the major's plane went 
into a shallow dive and exploded. His 
plane may have been hit by enemy 
ground fire. 

The major leaves his wife, Marian, 
and their three children. 

Major Hoffecker, a veteran of World 
War II, flying in the Pacific, held the 
distinguished Flying Cross with gold 
stars and the Air Medal with six gold 
stars. His squadron participated in the 
Battle of Midway in attacks against 
the Japanese fleets, and compiled an 
impressive record in other Pacific 
action. 

In October, Major Hoffecker was 
the center of a heroic rescue when 
he was shot down by anti-aircraft fire 
over Japanese-held Jaluit Atoll. He 
was snatched from under the guns of 
the Japanese in a daring open sea 
rescue by a Catalina plane. 

Clarence Miles Charest 

Clarence Miles Charest, a former 
Maryland student and former chief 
counsel for the Bureau of Internal 
Revenue, died in Washington recently. 
His age was 66. 

He was a member of the American 
and District Bar Associations. 

In his earlier years he was a promi- 
nent tennis player. Besides having 
been four times District of Columbia 
champion, he was the Middle Atlantic 
men's doubles champion in 1920, 1921 
and 1922, and winner of the National 
Veterans' singles championship in 1929, 
1932 and 1933. 

Mr. Charest lost his right arm in 
a hunting accident in 1917. In serving 
he had held the ball and the racquet 
in his left hand, and had thrown the 
ball in the air with the same motion 
with which he raised his racquet. If 
the first serve was a fault, he drew a 
second ball from his pocket. 

Helen Yelton Fearnow 

Mrs. Helen Yelton Fearnow, '41 Edu- 
cation, died in an automobile accident 
near Barstow, California, on September 
20. Burial was at Williamsport, Mary- 
land, the home of her husband, Dwight 
0. Fearnow, '44 Engineering. In addi- 
tion to her husband, she is survived by 
her mother, two brothers, and a sister. 

Mrs. Berdye Ruark 

Mrs. Berdye Ruark, a University 
housemother for Alpha Epsilon Phi, 
was killed when the bus in which she 
was riding crashed into a tree near 
Gainesville, Virginia. 

Injured was Mrs. Rosalie Earle, as- 



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Phone Frederick 1458 



Phones 
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Office 

9 N. COURT ST. Frederick, Md. 



Phone Frederick 2530 

Oral Prosthetic Laboratory 

22S-27 N. MARKET STREET 
Frederick, Md. 

Joseph H. Wolf, Dentist 



sistant housemother from Dorm 2. 

The pair was returning from a trip 
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[41] 



We are proud to be a part of Hagerstown s 
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The Hagerstown Rubber Co. 

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OWEN D. YOUNG: - 

"You travel the road to leadership 
heavily laden. While the 9 to 5 o'clock 
worker takes his ease you are toiling 
through the night. Laboriously you ex- 
tend your mental frontiers. Any new 
effort, psychologists say, wears a new 
groove in the brain. And the grooves 
that lead to the heights are not made 
between 9 and 5. They are bunted in 
by midnight oil." 

[42] 



J. 


B. FERGUSON & CO. 




ENGINEERS 




CONSTRUCTORS 




HAGERSTOWN. MD. 



**•*•****•*** 
OSCAR WILDE:— 
"We are all in the gutter, but some 
of us are looking at the stars." 



HAGERSTOWN 

(Continued from Page 12) 

grasses make dairying productive and 
profitable. Corn, oats, hay, potatoes, 
wool, rye, and honey also add their 
share to the rich coffers of Washington 
County and Hagerstown. 

But statistics alone do not show a 
true picture of any community. The 
friendly hospitality of the people, the 
magnificence of a countryside bounded 
on all sides by mountains and forests, 
the gleam of silver creeks meandering 
through the sunshine and all of this 
shadowed by the lives and deaths of 
the men and women who are and who 
made history affords an equally im- 
portant picture of the heart of Hagers- 
town and Washington County. The ves- 
tiges of history fuse with everyday 
living and exist as mute testimony to 
gieat times and greater men in such 
profusion as to be commonplace. 
Down the Valley 

Southward down the Hagerstown 
v alley stretches the bleak battlefield of 
Antietam where the bloodiest single 
day's battle of the Civil War was 
fought on September 17, 1862. Had 




TO GEORGE WASHINGTON 

First monument erected to George Washington. 
Located on top of South Mountain near Boons- 
boro. Md. 



Lee's army won the victory at Antietam 
it would have been only a matter of 
days before he would have dictated the 
terms of peace at Washington in favor 
of the Confederate States. 

Northwest of Hagerstown fields of 
giain wave in the sunlight which once 
shone on Lee's entrenchments when the 
Confederate guns completely covered 
the town in his last invasion of Mary- 
land. 

In the surrounding territory looms 
South Mountain on which stands the 
first monument to George Washington. 
The name of the father of this country 
was associated with Hagerstown on 
many occasions. On October 20, 1790 
President Washington and his escort 
was announced passing through Hag- 
erstown on his way to Mount Vernon, 
and in honor of this visit one of the 



principle streets marking the route he 
took has been named after him. 
From the Indians 

In the vicinity of Sharpsburg and 
near Antietam Creek many archae- 
ological specimens of the Catawbas and 
Delaware Indians have been found 
under mounds and earthworks. Arrow- 
heads, skinning knives, pestles, toma- 
hawks and an abundance of stone im- 
plements have been found. Stone burial 
mounds have been opened and found 
to contain pottery, ornaments and 
pipes in addition to the bones of the 
early aboriginal inhabitants of the 
countryside. These Indians, while also 
terrorizing the settlers, fought among 
themselves over the magnificent hunt- 
ing grounds in Washington County. 
Some of the tribes of the northern 
Delawaies and the southern Catawbas 
around 1736 engaged in a bloody battle, 
according to legend, and fought until 
every Delaware brave was killed ex- 
cept one. Every Catawba Indian had 
at least one or more scalps to bring 
home except for one lone brave. To 
maintain his honor before his tribe he 
pursued the lone Delaware survivor to 
the shores of the Susquehana until he 
was able to return home triumphantly 
with the fugitive's scalp, his honor be- 
ing upheld. 

First Steamboat 

Washington County can claim also 
a partial share in another phase of 
history . . . the construction of the first 
sucessful steamboat, ante-dating Ful- 
ton's by some 20 years. James Rumsey 
oi Shepherdstown, W. Va., in 1785 con- 
structed a boat fitted with machinery 
partly manufactured at the Catoctin 
Furnace of the Johnson Brothers near 
Frederick and iron from the Antietam 
Iron Works. This early boat attained 
the astounding speed of four miles an 
hour against the current of the Poto- 
mac River. 

The Almanac 

In 1794 John Gruber first issued a 
publication which has carried the name 
of Hagerstown, Maryland, the length 
arid breadth of this country from the 
end of the 18th Century to the present 
time Gruber's "Hagerstown Town and 
Country Almanac" first came into be- 
ing in that year and was for many 
years printed in German. The homely 
sayings and bits of agricultural and 
domestic advice in this publication have 
endeared it to the hearts of its readers 
for many, many years both at home 
and abroad. 



(This is the first in a series of articles on 
Western Maryland) 



ATHISAANDATHATA 

TERP W ITH aU °f ns worried 
L^Jaifc, about the rising cost of 

living, note that funeral rates 
have climbed 20%. . . . 
Music is being used to 
relax surgery patients. 
These are referred 
to as opening num- 
bers. . . . Cheating 
scandal gave critics 
a chance to belabor 
the Point. 




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[43] 




DR. WATSON IN NEW YORK 

Dr. J. Donald Watson, Professor of Finance at the University of Maryland (left) in conference 
with Walter Weissinger (right). Vice President in charge of Agency Relations of the New York 
Life Insurance Company. Agency Assistant Robert P. Stieglitz, who worked closely with Dr. Watson 
in his on-the-spot study of New York Life's Home Office operations, is shown in the background. 
Dr. Watson was on a Fellowship granted by the Life Insurance Management Association. 

Dr. Watson was one of 14 university teachers of insurance, selected from universities through- 
out the United States, to study life insurance methods with a leading life company. His four-week 
Summer Fellowship, extending from August 6 to August 31, was granted by the Life Insurance 
Agency Management Association. 

While at New York Life's Home Office, Dr. Watson made a thorough study of such aspects 
of the company's operations as the selection and writing of policies, settlement of claims, actuarial 
and accounting methods and its large-scale housing and mortgage operations. 

Dr. Watson, whose courses at the University of Maryland cover life and property insurance, 
real estate and finance, is a Chartered Life Underwriter and received his Ph.D. in finance from 
Northwestern University. 



Co 



leae of 

Business & Public 
Administration 

By Egbert F. Tingley '27 



Port of Baltimore 

THE Port of Baltimore in export 
trade was the topic of a publica- 
tion by the Bureau of Business and 
Economic Research. Fluctuations in ex- 
ports are traced for the past sixteen 
years, and in relation to the competi- 
tive position of other ports, commodity 
concentrations, and countries of desti- 
nation. 

In an introductory statement, the re- 
port says, "Since the sixteen years of 
trade included ranges through periods 
of recovery from a depression, defense 
preparation, World War II, postwar ad- 
justment, and renewed defense, there 
is probably no basis for assuming that 
any year within the period was normal. 
Moreover, the significance of commer- 
cial competition between ports has been 
modified by many circumstances, in- 
cluding arbitrary port assignment un- 
der pressure of war, relief, and recon- 
struction. Consequently, an effort has 



been made to present corrected quanti- 
tative data in descriptive relationships, 
and to search for casual factors. This 
contribution has appeared particularly 
urgent since the many difficulties and 
barriers encountered have discouraged 
previous researchers." 

The Port of Baltimore exports pri- 
marily coal, iron and steel, grain, and 
other products of agriculture. Coal ex- 
ports originate principally in Maryland, 
West Virginia, Ohio, and Pennsylvania, 
grain in the Midwest, iron and steel in 
Pittsburgh - Youngstown - Cleveland 
areas, and Sparrows Point, Maryland. 

As background for relating exports 
to current conditions, reference is made 
to United States grants and loans from 
July 1, 1940, through December, 1950, 
and the United States and international 
agencies functioning in the fields of 
finance and other aids. Total United 
States shipments and shipments by 
coastal ports are analyzed in detail, 
and charts and tables help visualize 
trends. 

Postwar Boom 

In describing the diverse movements, 
the publication reads, "Baltimore, in 
contrast to New York and Philadelphia, 
received no substantial wartime addi- 
tions to volume of exports. Beginning 
in 1945, a tremendous postwar boom 
reached a peak in 1947, but declined 
rapidly thereafter, though the 1950 
position was favorable in comparison 
with prewar levels. 

"In the prewar period, the course of 
Baltimore's exports reflects general 



economic conditions in the United 
States, rising in 1937 and declining dur- 
ing the recession of 1938. From 1938 
exports increased steadily to 1940, the 
level in 1940 reaching 165 per cent 
above the level of 1938, and 80 per cent 
above the previous high year of 1937. 
For the Atlantic Coast as a whole, the 
increase from 1938 to 1940 was 65 per 
cent, and 78 per cent from 1938 to 1941. 

"Therefore, prior to 1940, the rate 
of growth of Baltimore exports was 
greater than the rate of the Atlantic 
Coast as a whole. With the exception 
of a decline in 1942, immediately after 
American entry into the war, the vol- 
ume of exports from Atlantic Coast 
ports . . . rose steadily from 1938 to 
1945." 

Civilian Supplies 

The tremendous volumes of 1947 ex- 
ports were primarily shipments of civil- 
ian supplies, fuel, and foodstuffs. For 
coal-and-grain-shipping Baltimore this 
was the best export year in history. 
Baltimore's concentration on these bulk 
commodities accounted for the continu- 
ous rapid growth of its exports from 
1944 on, uninterrupted, as were the 
other ports in 1946, by a decline re- 
flecting the cessation of military ex- 
ports. 

Evidence of the shift in relative posi- 
tion of ports from 1945 to 1947, in 
which the Hampton Roads area par- 
ticipated, is provided in the following 
comparison: 

Exports as Per Cents of 
Atlantic Coast Totals 

Ports 1945 1947 

New York 40.0 24.4 

Philadelphia 23.9 12.9 

Baltimore 13.2 23.6 

Hampton Roads 9.4 32.6 

All Other 13.5 6.5 

Total, Atl. Coast 100.0 100.0 

These percentages point up two in- 
teresting relationships: 1. Such consid- 
erable growth occurred in exports from 
the Port of Baltimore that its volume 
in 1947 closely approximated shipments 
from the Port of New York. 2. Poten- 
tially a very important export region 
is indicated by the figures for Hamp- 
ton Roads, which includes the Virginia 
ports of Norfolk and Newport News. 

Enormous shipments of coal during 
the years 1946, 1947, and 1948 account 
for the increased activity of these two 
ports. In the peak year of 1947 total 
exports from Hampton Roads were 42.3 
billion pounds, of which 40.3 billion 
pounds, or 95.2 per cent, were of coal 
and related products. 

In 1950, grains led in export shipping 
weight, with almost 39 per cent of the 
total Baltimore exports. Iron and steel 
ranked second with 19 per cent. In 
the emergency rehabilitation year, 1947, 
coal approximated 76 per cent of total 
weight in contrast to 12 per cent in 
1950. In the latter year, Brazil re- 
ceived 79 per cent of coal passing out 
of Baltimore. In 1950, 64 per cent of 
Baltimore wheat exports were destined 
for Germany, and 17 per cent for the 
United Kingdom. In the same year, 



[44] 



France and Mexico each received about 
10 per cent of iron and steel exports. 
Nineteen countries shared close to 83 
per cent of iron and steel exports. 
Capt. Bob Condon 

Alumnus Robert D. Condon, Captain, 
Army Reserve, (A. & S. '42), has been 
appointed new commandant of the 
Benedictine Cadet Corps. 

The new commandant is 32 years old 
and served as a paratrooper with the 
Eighty-second Airborne Division in 
World War II. 

An outstanding high school and col- 
lege athlete, in his freshman year at 
Maryland in 1937 he played halfback 
on the football team, took third in the 
Southern Conference indoor three- 
quarter-mile run and won the half in 
all outdoor meets. In his sophomore 
year he won the District of Columbia 
AAU 660-yard championship. He was 
a member of the 4-mile relay team 
which won the national championship 
at the Penn Relays. He set a course 
record in winning the Virginia dual 
cross-country and placed well up in 
other contests. 

He was the second man from the 
University of Maryland ever to win the 
Southern Conference indoor track 
crown in the 880. 

Upon graduation he was commis- 
sioned a second lieutenant in the infan- 
try. He went through parachute school 
at Ft. Benning, Ga., then joined the 
Eighty-second Division. He saw serv- 
ice in Africa, Sicily and Italy, was 
wounded and sent home. 

Later he trained troops at Camp 
Croft, S. C, but asked to be returned 
to parachute duty. He went abroad 
again and was in the hospital in Amiens 
just before V-E Day. 

In West Virginia 

W. H. Eierman '44 has been named 
the Trust Officer of the Union National 
Bank in Clarksburg, West Virginia. At 
fifteen years of age, he began his 
career as a messenger in the Federal 
Reserve Bank of Baltimore, because 
he wanted to work "in the biggest and 
most prosperous looking building in 
Baltimore." He served as a Flight En- 
gineer on B-29's during his three and 
a half years in World War II. He 
married a Maryland graduate, Mary 
Harris. They have a three-year-old 
daughter in their home in Bridgeport, 
West Virginia. Mr. Eierman is also 
President of the West Virginia Life 
Insurance Trust Council. 

Former Students 

(Names selected at random) 

1926 — John L. McKewen, a resident 
of Baltimore, is a member of the firm 
of Irving & McKewen, certified public 
accountants. He has served on several 
committees appointed by the Mayor of 
Baltimore. A veteran of World War I, 
when he served with the 115th Infan- 
try, 29th Division, he is a member of 
the Disabled American Veterans of the 
World War, American Legion, Knights 
of Columbus, American Institute of Ac- 
countants, National Association of Cost 
Accountants and the Maryland Associ- 
ation of Certified Public Accountants. 
While at the University, he was affili- 



M\< I 




i«»o 



Fidelity and Deposit 
company of maryland 

Home Office: Baltimore* $td. 



FIDELITY AND SURETY BONDS 

Burglary, Robbery, Forgery & Glass Insurance 



OLDSMOBILE 




ROCKET 



ANDERSON OLDSMOBILE, Inc. 

I 14 West North Avenue Phone MUlberry 0232 
BALTIMORE I, MARYLAND 



New Cars 
Used Cars 



Parts and 
Service 



ated with Delta Sigma Pi, interna- 
tional professional commerce fratern- 
ity. He married the former Marie Vic- 
toria Lochner of Baltimore.. 
In College Park 
1929— Edward Nelson (Pud) Snouf- 
fer, Jr., who lives in Calvert Hills, Col- 
lege Park, is secretary of West Broth- 
ers Brick Company, manufacturers of 
brick and hollow tile, a Washington 
concern. He is a prominent member 
of the Kiwanis Club of Prince George's 
County. His wife is the former Polly 
Savage of Olney, Md., also a gradu- 
ate of the University. 



1938 — Paul R. Peffer is assistant to 
the vice president in charge of opera- 
tions of American Overseas Airlines, 
with offices at LaGuardia Field, N. Y. 
He resides in Garden City, L. I., N. Y. 
Following graduation, he was an insur- 
ance investigator and section chief for 
the Retail Credit Company of Wash- 
ington. During World War II, he 
served as second lieutenant with the 
Corps of Engineers, then as first lieu- 
tenant in the Army Air Forces. In 1943 
and 1944, he was a pilot and com- 
mander of the 302nd Transport Squad- 
ron flying from India to China over the 



[45] 



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TO $134.50 




FINE CUTLERY! 
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*& 

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MADE BY BRIDDELL of CRISFIELD, MD. 

President, Chas. D. Briddell, Class of 1935 



Reach for - - 




WEBSTER 

"THE COAL MAN" 

SMALL LOTS TO CARLOADS 

Coll Hurlock 3561 or 3571 

East New Market, Md 



GROW WITH QUALITY DORCO 
FERTILIZERS 

The Dorchester Fertilizer Co. 
Cambridge, Maryland 



C. C. OLIPHANT & SON, INC. 

ESTABLISHED 1921 

Roofing and Sheet Metal Contractors 

Heating - Ventilating - Air Conditioning 
"Barrett" - Bonded Roofers - "Carey" 

Telephones: Day 555 - Night 3789 LAUREL, DELAWARE 



"hump". He was the recipient of the 
Distinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal 
with oak leaf cluster, Presidential Dis- 
tinguished Unit Badge, European- 
African-Middle Eastern Theater Serv- 
ice Medal and Asiatic-Pacific Theater 
Service Medal with 2 bronze stars. He 
left the service with the rank of major. 
At the University, he was president of 
the Rossborough Club, a member of Al- 
pha Tau Omega Fraternity, Men's 
League and the Interfraternity Coun- 
cil. He married the former Lois M. 
Kuhn of Bethesda, Md., a 1938 Mary- 
land graduate. 

At Crisfield 

1939— Ira T. Todd, Jr., a resident of 
Crisfield, Md., is engaged in the whole- 
sale seafood producing business. He 
was with the Burroughs Adding Ma- 
chine Company for a few months after 
his graduation, and for two years was 
with the Income Tax Department. En- 
tering the armed forces in World War 
II, he rose from the rank of private 
to captain, and saw service in England, 
New Guinea, Philippines and Japan. 
He is a member of the Crisfield Cham- 
ber of Commerce and the Masons. At 
Maryland, he was affiliated with Delta 
Sigma Phi Fraternity. He is married 
to the former Virginia Tawes of Cris- 
field. 

1939 — William Irving Miller is asso- 
ciated with Pan American Airways, 
Inc., and at last reports, had his office 
in Paris, France. His home is in Bal- 
timore. He worked with Sun Oil Com- 
pany of Baltimore from 1939 to 1941, 
then with S. J. Groves & Sons Com- 
pany, Antigua, British West Indies, 
from 1941 to 1942. During World War 
II, he was overseas with commercial 
organizations, and was on inactive duty 
in the U. S. Naval Reserves on special 
assignment to Pan American Airways. 
While at the University, he was a mem- 
ber of Kappa Alpha Fraternity, Beta 
Alpha Psi, Latch Key Society and the 
"M" Club. His wife is the former Iris 
C. E. Fearneley of East Angus, Que- 
bec, Canada. 

In Los Angeles 

1939 — Robert M. Neiman, a resident 
of Los Angeles, Calif., has been associ- 
ated with the Equitable Life Assurance 
Society since graduation, with the ex- 
ception of the period from November, 

1940, to April, 1946, when he was in the 
U. S. Marine Corps. Enlisting as a 
private, he was commissioned in March, 

1941, and was promoted steadily dur- 
ing the War, leaving the service with 
rank of major. He saw action in the 
engagements at Kwajalien, Saipan, 
Tinian, Iwo Jima and Okinawa, and 
was in North China when the Japanese 
army surrendered there on September 1, 
1945. Awarded the Navy Cross, Bronze 
Star, Navy Letter of Commendation 
with Ribbon, 3 Presidential Unit Cita- 
tions, 2 Navy Unit Citations, 5 Com- 
bat Stars on Asiatic-Pacific Campaign 
Ribbon, he also holds the China Ribbon, 
American Defense Ribbon, American 
Theater Ribbon and Victory Ribbon. 
He will be remembered at Maryland 
as coach of the fencing team, a mem- 
ber of both the Diamondback and Ter- 



[46] 



rapin staff and of Delta Sigma Phi 
Fraternity. 

1940 — Linwood P. Row is now with 
Allied Van Lines in Hag-erstown, in the 
accounting department. Since gradua- 
tion, he has held nositions with the 
Western Maryland Railroad and Fair- 
child Aircraft Corporation, both in 
Hagerstown, and with the General Ac- 
counting Office in Washington. He 
served with the 78th Lighting Division, 
309th Infantry, during World War II. 
In Hagerstown, he is a member of the 
Junior Chamber of Commerce, an-i 
has been active in the Potomac Play- 
makers, as well as the Masons. He was 
affiliated with Theta Chi Fraternity at 
the University. His wife is the former 
Sarah Elizabeth Carpenter of Hancock. 
Md. 

"Semper Fidelis" 

1940 — Julius W. Ireland, at last re- 
ports, was making his career with the 
U. S. Marine Corps. Following gradu- 
ation, he worked for Bendix Radio for 
six months. He took flight training as a 
Marine Cadet at Jacksonville and Mi- 
ami, and saw action in the Solomons, 
Okinawa and the Philippines, destroy- 
ing five Jap fighter planes during the 
War. His decorations include the Dis- 
tinguished Flying Cross, Air Medal and 
Presidential Unit Citation with star. 
He had attained the rank of major 
when heard from last, and was sta- 
tioned at El Toro, Calif., with resi- 
dence in Santa Ana. At Maryland, he 
was a member of Theta Chi Fraternity. 
He married the former Virginia Sohl of 
Baltimore. 

1940 — Herbert S. Young, whose home 
address is Lynbrook, L. I., N. Y., is 
now treasurer of the Shurdut Mill Sup- 
ply Company, Manila, P. I., an im- 
porting firm of mill supplies, machin- 
ery and hardware. Before the war, he 
was manager of Schine Circuit, Inc., a 
theater chain, at Gloversville. Cort- 
land and Syracuse, N. Y., and later 
was associated with Highway Express 
I ines in Baltimore. He was commis- 
sioned an ensign in the U. S. Naval Re- 
serves shortly after Pearl Harbor, and 
was released from active duty as a lieu- 
tenant in December, 1945. His service 
consisted of both sea and shore duty. 
He was on the U.S.S. O'Brien, head- 
ouarters of the commander-in-caief, 
U.S. Fleet, and was an instructor at 
the Naval Training School, Hollywood, 
Fla., and the Naval Training Cent3r, 
San Diego, Calif. At the University, 
he will be remembered as a member of 
Tau Epsilon Phi Fraternity and the 
Latch Key Society. He married the 
former Selma Schultz of Lynbrook, 
N. Y. 

In Pittsburgh 

1940 — A. I. (Chip) Davis is an in- 
ternal auditor with the Carnegie-Illi- 
nois Steel Corporation in Pittsburgh, 
Pa., where he makes his home. He has 
also held accounting positions with E. 
I. DuPont de Nemours Company, Inc., 
in Wilmington, Del., and with Haskins 
& Sells in Baltimore. During World 
War II, he was with the Sea Bees and 
served 30 months, including 18 months 



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AIR CONDITIONERS - REFRIGERATION - AUTOMATIC ICE MAKERS 

FORNEY'S ENGINEERING SERVICE 

18 North Hanson Street 
Phone: Easton 651 Easton, Md. 



CAROLINE 


POULTRY 


FARMS 


Packers and Shippers 


of " Caroline" Brand 


FEDERALSBURG, MD. 

Plants at Denton, Md., Federalsburg, Md. 


Member Institute of American Poultry Industr 
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ries MARYLAND POULTRY DIRECT 
FROM THE EASTERN SHORE 


Phone Federalsburg 2551 



CARL J. WILLIAMS & SONS 

CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 

1006 West St. • Salisbury, Maryland • Phone 5444 



[47] 



in the Pacific where he saw action in 
the Marianna Islands and at Tinian. 
He is a member of the National Asso- 
ciation of Cost Accountants, Veterans 
of Foreign Wars and Carnegie A.A. 
His wife is the former Margaret A. 
McWilliams of Pittsburgh, Pa. 



Allen Tyler 
& Son, Inc. 

MASONRY 
CONTRACTORS 

Cambridge, Md. 



SALISBURY AUTO 

SPRING WORKS 

Inc. 

AUTO SPRINGS 

Cars - Trucks - Buses 

FRONT END and WHEEL 
ALIGNMENT 

Frames and Axles Straightened 

Phone 5793 

S. SALISBURY BLVD. 

Salisbury, Md. 



THE 
KENT 

CONCRETE 
COMPANY 

Phone: Chestertown 489 

CHESTERTOWN 
MARYLAND 



1940 — H. John Badenhoop, a resident 
of Ridgefield, N. J., is a special agent 
with Fidelity & Guaranty Insurance 
Corporation in New York City. Enter- 
ing the Army as a second lieutenant 
in July, 1940, he served overseas as 
major in the 656th Tank Destroyer 
Battalion, 9th Armored Division, and 
was with the first troops to cross the 
Rhine River on the Remagen Bridge- 
head. He received the Bronze Star 
Medal, Theater Ribbons and Medals 
and Battle Stars. Upon separation 
from the service in December, 1945, he 
had attained the rank of lieutenant 
colonel. At Maryland, he was a member 
of Kappa Alpha Fraternity, Scabbard 
and Blade and the "M" Club. He is now 
affiliated with the Suburban New York 
Field Club. His wife is the former 
Martha Elizabeth Carter of Weldon, 
N. C. Both his father, Herman Baden- 
hoop, Jr., and brother, William H. 
Badenhoop, are Maryland graduates. 

At Rockville 

1941 — George O. Kephart is part- 
owner and manager of the Rockville 
Supply Company in Rockville, Md., his 
home town. He was a salesman with 
International Business Machines Cor- 
poration for eight months prior to 
World War II, when he enlisted in the 
U. S. Coast Guard. He was commis- 
sioned ensign in June, 1942, and lieu- 
tenant (j.g.) in May, 1943. Later, he 
was designated Coast Guard aviator 
and was promoted to lieutenant in July, 
1944. While at the University, he was 
a member of Kappa Alpha Fraternity, 
Omici-on Delta Kappa and Pi Delta 
Epsilon, and worked on the Old Line 
Magazine. He is now a member of the 
Washington Board of Trade. He mar- 
ried the former Maryann Griffith of 
Silver Spring, Md., a 1942 graduate 
of the University. 

In Cheverly 

1941 — Joseph M. Joyce, whose home 
is in Cheverly, Md., is a salesman with 
the Maryland Oxygen Company of Bal- 
timore, manufacturer of compressed 
gases. Inducted into the Army at the 
outset of World War II, he studied at 
Officers' Candidate School, Fort Ben- 
ning, Ga., and later became an instruc- 
tor at Fort McClellan with the 98th 
Division. He participated in the Saipan 
campaign and in the occupation of 
Japan, and was promoted to captain. 
At Maryland, he was a member of 
Sigma Nu Fraternity and the Newman 
Club. His wife is the former Elizabeth 
M. Buckley of Cheverly. 

1942 — James A. Fanning is with the 
General Electric Company at Schenec- 
tady, N. Y., in the accounting depart- 
ment. During World War II, he 
achieved the rank of lieutenant in the 
Navy, serving as communications offi- 
cer on an ammunition ship and mine 
layer. He is still a member of the U. S. 
Naval Reserves. While at the Univer- 
sity, he was affiliated with Theta Chi 
Fraternity. He is married to the for- 
mer Barbara Vicking of Schenectady. 

1943_Carl E. Vincent lives in Salis- 
bury, Md., where he is in public ac- 
counting work with F. W. Lafrontz & 



BUS SERVICE 

EASTERN SHORE 

* Delaware * Maryland 
* Virginia 



DEPARTURES FROM 

BALTIMORE — WASHINGTON 
PHILADELPHIA — NORFOLK 




SALISBURY, MD. 



TRAPPE 

FROZEN FOODS 
CORPORATION 

FREEZERS 

of 
QUALITY FOODS 

PEAS 

CORN 

LIMA BEANS 

TRAPPE, MARYLAND 



Geo. A. 
Christy &) Son 

Catchers & Shippers of 

Selected 
Sea Foods 

CRISFIELD, 

Maryland 



Company. He had prior experience in 
the same field for nearly two years 
with Hilton, Sheffield & Hilton in Nor- 
folk, Va. In addition to his studies at 
Maryland, he attended Salisbury State 
Teachers College for a year. He is a 
member of the American Accounting 



[48] 



Association and the Salisbury Junior 
Chamber of Commerce. He will be re- 
membered at Maryland for his work 
with the Collegiate Chamber of Com- 
merce and the Wesley Methodist Club. 

1943 — William L. Ellis, a resident of 
Washington, D. C, is associated with 
International Business Machines Cor- 
poration as a sales representative. In 
addition to his studies at Maryland, he 
was an administrative clerk with the 
Post Office Department from 1938 to 
1943, when he entered the Navy as an 
ensign. In 1944 he was transfered to 
Sampson, N. Y., and promoted to lieu- 
tenant (j.g.) in the communication and 
postal section. The following year, he 
went to Ceylon and India, and was pro- 
moted to lieutenant. Besides attending 
Maryland, he studied at Georgetown 
University from 1939 to 1942. He was 
a member of Beta Gamma Sigma Fra- 
ternity. His wife is the former Dora- 
tha Winifred Lanham of Silver Spring, 
Md. 

In Columbia, S. C. 

1947 — Vern H. Gransee, whose home 
is in Columbia, S. C, is engaged in 
credit work with Standard Oil Com- 
pany in that city. For several months 
following graduation, he was in the 
same field with Sherwin-Williams Com- 
pany in Columbia. His studies at the 
University were broken by World War 
II. From 1941 to 1943, he was in the 
infantry, working his way up from 
private to second lieutenant. After 
more than a year's training in naviga- 
tion and bombardiering, he was sent 
overseas in 1944, flying to China. As- 
signed to the 341st Bomb Group of the 
14th A.F., he flew missions to East 
China and French Indo-China as a 
navigator. Before the conclusion of hos- 
tilities, he was promoted to first lieu- 
tenant, which rank he still holds in the 
Reserves. At Maryland, he was a mem- 
ber of Beta Alpha Psi Fraternity, Bap- 
tist Student Union and Collegiate 
Chamber of Commerce. He married the 
former Emaree Dixon of Columbia, 
S. C. 

1948— Frank B. LaPorte, formerly 
of Riverdale, Md., is now a salesman 
for the National Advertising Company 
of Madison, Wis., with his headquar- 
ters in Westminster, Md. He attended 
the University three years, was with 
the U. S. Army Air Corps in World 
War II from 1941 to 1947, and then re- 
turned to Maryland for his final year. 
During the War, he was a communica- 
tions officer with the rank of captain, 
and was decorated with the Distin- 
guished Flying Cross and Legion of 
Merit. At the University, he was a 
member of the Young Democratic Club, 
Day Dodger Club and Collegiate Cham- 
ber of Commerce. 

In Wisconsin 

1948 — Malcolm L. Calder, a resident 
of Baltimore, is an accountant with 
Martin J. Barry, Inc., of that city. His 
studies at the University also were 
broken because of World War II, dur- 
ing which he served with Naval Con- 
struction Battalions in the United 

(Concluded on Page 64) 




RICE'S STAR BREAD 

Popular — because it's Qooct! 



CRISFIELD, MARYLAND 



THE CAMBRIDGE MANUFACTURING CO. 

Manufacturers of 
t lew - Uim d5roiler creeds 

FOR FASTER GROWING CHICKS 

CAMBRIDGE, MD. 



Salisbury Milling Co. 

Incorporated 

Flour - Table Meal 

PURINA and ECONOMY FEEDS 

SALISBURY • MARYLAND 



The COHN & BOCK Co. 

LUMBER • BUILDING MATERIAL 
poultry FEEDS livestock 

Princess Anne, Maryland 











-srveru IAJ. ^rrall 






INSURANCE SERVICE 






More than 25 years experience 
Associates: Walter Jones • Don Hall 






105 Calvert St. Salisbury, Maryland 




/ 




\ 



[49] 



WELL 




Creosoted 
Products 



Telephone: 

Salisbury 2-2144; 2-2145 

Phila. Flanders 2-0771 

Salisbury, Md. 



PAIL V. 
DOWNING 

PAVING CONTRACTOR 
Asphalt • Concrete 

Estimates Furnished 
upon request 

Phone 7590 
SALISBURY, MD. 



J. RICHARD PHILLIPS, JR. 
& SONS, INC. 

Growers and Processors of 
Quality Food Products 

Phone: 38 
BoxH - Berlin, Md. 



EASTERN SHORE FOLK 

(Continued from Page 7) 

When I saw Pete's bull I could hardly 
believe it. How could our runt of a 
half-bull have sliced him up like that? 
Anyhow I was feeling fine. "Listen, 
Pete," I told him. "You said yesterday 
that my bull could defend my fence. 
Well, it looks to me like he can. But 
you insisted on letting your bull out." 
Pete accepted that and he never told 
anybody what happened. We never had 
any more trouble with Pete's bull — or 
with Pete. 

At Lions Club 

For the first few months we didn't 
see much of our friends in town. You 
see, they were watching to see what 
kind of a fellow I am. Then one day 
Pat Duggan came. "You know, Dinu, 
we'd like you to tell the Lions Club 
f.bout your experiences behind the Iron 
Curtain." Then they asked me to join, 
and said "Never mind the dues. You 
can pay later." But asking me to speak 
was just a pretext. From that time 
everybody began coming at night to 
visit us; Johnny George, Dave Hayer 
and a lot of others. 

We used to see the headlights coming 
far down the road and ask, "Who can 
it be tonight?" Then, before they left 
our new friends would say: "Why don't 
you come to see us ? You must get to 
know people around here." With my 
European feeling I wasn't trying to see 
people too soon. I was thinking they 
might not like to see us. I didn't know 
I would have to do those things. 

But the real entering into their life 
came when Dudley Roe invited us for 
a party. Because he was the most im- 
portant man anywhere around it meant 
we were accepted. It was a wonderful 
American party. Nobody asked if we 
were foreigners. They just made us 
the center of everything; men all ask- 
ing Ileana to dance, and the ladies all 
glad to dance with me. I think Ileana 
and I never danced so much with our 
hearts as we did that night. After that 
all the doors were open. 

No One Said "Don't" 
Those spring months were wonderful 
for us, but terrible for our chickens. 
We'd bought a thousand chicks. The 
fellow who delivered them left a book 
of instructions. I got more instructions 
from him than from the hospital when 
Danny was born. In Romania I never 
heard of a chicken disease. So I tried 
doing things my own way, and it was 
all wrong. I was just crazy enough to 
clean the chicken house. In all the 
papers I read nobody said don't do it. 
But the vet told me later there's a new 
theory. You should leave the same 
manure with each flock — only change 
for a new flock — because the manure 
gives chickens lots of vitamins. I pet- 
ted and fussed over our chicks like they 
were a beautiful woman. But they 
started dying — fifteen or twenty every 
day. It seems that chickens can have 
everything; from a slight cold even to 
a heart-breaking disease. If you don't 
talk to them, they feel sick. I talked 
— I even flirted with them — but I didn't 
have the right sex appeal. We just had 
to keep burying our poor chicks; and 



'e are proud 
to have played 
a part in 
the building 
program of 
this University. 

EDWIN 

WILSON 

BOOTH 

Architect 
SALISBURY, MD. 



SALISBURY 

BRICK 

CO. 

SALISBURY. MARYLAND 



Dealers and 
manufacturers of 

all kinds of 

clay products 

and accessories. 



Telephone: Salisbury 4333 



G. D. BULL 

WHOLESALE 

Fruit and Produce 

Phone: 111 
POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 



by July most of them were gone. I 
owed a lot of money. Some was loaned 
to me till the chickens would pay. So 



[50] 



we had to leave the farm and take a 
smaller place. 

I got a seasonal job in a dehydrating 
plant. That was my first contact with 
American workers. Being a foreigner I 
was a little afraid; how are they going 
to feel about me ? I had never lifted 
heavy sacks in my life. Even when I 
put all my strength it nearly broke my 
back, and I was weighing 215 pounds 
at least. Then George Long, an older 
worker, came and showed me how I 
can handle five sacks easier than I 
did three before then. They all helped 
me. They gave me the feeling I am not 
a foreigner — I am an American, a 
worker like they are. One day some- 
body made a joke; that I am sleeping 
on bags at night. Right away one fel- 
low said : "Come home with me, Dinu. 
I have an extra room." 

Helpful Hands 
Another day I got off the road in a 
swamp with a truck and trailer. I found 
a nearby f aimer, but his truck got 
stuck trying to pull mine out. He drove 
me fifteen miles to get a tractor, and 
spent four hours rescuing me. I could 
see he was poor, but when I tried to 
pay him he said: "Look here young 
man. My father was a foreigner like 
you. At first he had a very hard time. 
I'd like to help you like other people 
helped my father." When I brought 
some candy for his kids on Sunday, he 
just said: "You've got kids of your own. 
Keep it for them." 

For a while I was working with 
Dudley when he bought a big expensive 
corn drier. Then the price of corn fell 
too low and I was out of a job. It was 
September. The dehydrating plant was 
shut down because the alfalfa was fin- 
ished. I was going around husking 
corn, here and there. Then — nothing. 
I spent my days at home, breaking my 
head about how to pay all our debts. 
It gave me a state of nerves like I 
never had before. I stopped visiting 
our friends. I didn't want them to think 
I was looking for work. I just couldn't 
face some of those good people: the 
grocery man whose bills I couldn't pay; 
Dudley, who gave me all the feed for 
our chickens on credit; Jimmy, the 
mayor, to whom I still owed money for 
the oil and the burner; Mrs. Borne, for 
the milk. 

This Is "The Beautiful Part" 
And here is the beautiful part. They 
started pouring into our house again 
like they did when they asked me to 
join the Lions Club. "Hey, Dinu!" they 
said. "What's the idea ? You and Ileana 
have to come and see us." That was 
when we understood what real, true 
friends they were. Mrs. Borne was say- 
ing, "Don't pay for the milk. Some 
other time is all right." Mr. Hamblett 
came and said: "You don't buy as much 
groceries like you used to. Don't be 
ashamed for credit, Dinu. Your kids 
have to eat. Nobody starves in the 
United States. Buy what you want. 
You can pay when you can." 

We had the worst luck all in one 
bundle. By Thanksgiving Ileana was 
sick and in Washington. But our good 
neighbors came to take care of Bobby 
and little Danny. They kept bringing 
Thanksgiving dinners. We had three 




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N. Aurora Street 

EASTON, MARYLAND 



turkeys — I don't know how many pies. 
Never in our lives we had such wonder- 
ful friends. 

The more I thought about it the more 
I felt I should leave this Eastern Shore, 
even though we all loved it so much. 
In a small farming country like this 
there can't be many possibilities to earn 
good money — to save and pay your 
debts. I decided to look for a job maybe 
near New York. But when our friends 
heard we were leaving they poured into 
our house again. Dudley Roe was one 
of the first. 

"Dinu, I can't offer you a job," he 
said. "You told me once you'd never 
take another man's job away from him. 
But maybe you have some idea about 
a business of your own. I'll loan you 
the money." . . . Then Mayor Jimmy 
came. "Everything I have is tied up 
in my oil business," he said. "But I 
hate to see you leave our Eastern 
Shore, feeling you lost a battle for a 
new life. You shouldn't feel like that. 
If you'll stay, we could work this busi- 
ness together. Don't leave us." . . . 
He was speaking like that. How could 
anybody answer Jimmy Ryan without 
tears in his eyes ? 

Long Island Cesspools 

I tried to explain to Jimmy, Dudley, 
Johnny George and all the others. I 
didn't blame the Eastern Shore, and I 
didn't feel the battle was lost. But how 
could I accept so much more from such 
generous friends? I had found a job 
on Long Island; cleaning out cesspools. 
"Here I couldn't earn over $150 a 
month perhaps. There I can earn bet- 
ter than twice as much. It's the only 
way, so I can begin to pay my debts." 
At last they said maybe I was right. 
But they all said, if it doesn't work out, 
come back. 

Mr. Hamblett also said something 
that meant a lot to me. "I'm glad 
you're going, Dinu. That's the Ameri- 
can way of doing things — always try- 
ing to find something better. I'm glad 
you picked this American way. You 
don't have to be ashamed. Go ahead, 
and good luck!" 

"Come Back to Us!" 
Then I went to the factory to say 
goodbye. A man named Starkey was 
the worker who was never talking — 
one of those close-mouths. "I'm sorry 
you're going, Dinu," he said. "If you 
ever come back, you can always live 
with us." 

We left just on Christmas Day, 1949. 
First I went to the banker in Sudlers- 
ville to whom I still owed $150 on my 
car. "I heard you are leaving," he said. 
1 was waiting to explain I couldn't pay 
the remainder on my loan yet. But he 
didn't give me a chance. "It's not our 
habit to let people leave here still ow- 
ing us money. But don't worry about 
your debt. You can keep paying us 
month by month." 

Jimmy Ryan gave us his truck for 
moving, sent his two men to help, and 
wouldn't let me pay a penny for it. 
That was Christmas afternoon. Mrs. 
Borne came with three big platters of 
roast turkey. And we all ate our fare- 
well dinner on the Eastern Shore to- 



gether. Maybe you can guess how 
Ueana and I were feeling. Like so 
many others who had lost everything 
in their European countries, we had 
lost so much confidence in life and in 
people by the time we reached America. 
Under the nazis, and then under the 
communists, we had seen so many 
people betraying their neighbors or 
friends for money or a better job. We 
had seen too much selfishness. Yes, we 
also knew many good and kind people. 
But we had never imagined people 
could be like these people on the East- 
ern Shore. 

On Long Island we found a nice little 
house without paying too much rent. 
Cleaning the cesspools was paying 
much better than it smelled — not to 
get rich, but better anyway. 

"Voice of America" 

Then a friend telephoned from New 
York one day. He said a group of 
Americans, all private citizens, were 
organizing some special radio programs 
to get the true facts to the people 
behind the Iron Curtain. They needed 
someone who knows the American life, 
and knows the life over there, who can 
speak in Romanian. This is going to 
be the Radio Free Europe. I really 
got pretty excited. This is a real job 
for me, I thought. Now I know what 
Americans are really like, and what a 
real democracy is. And I know what 
terribly hard lives my old friends in 
Romania are having. I know all the 
lies and propaganda they are hearing 
all the time — and how much they need 
to feel that the free world outside 
hasn't forgotten them. Sure, I can do 
this kind of a job. 

"The Best of Friends Ever" 

So I went to New York, and then I 
rushed home to tell Ileana the biggest 
and best news we had in nearly two 
years. Now I had a real work to do — 
for America, for the people in my 
native country, for all people who want 
to be free. Because we had really dis- 
covered America I had a place in this 
great fight for freedom. 

I know what I want most to do. 
Before we left the Eastern Shore I told 
our friends: First I must save some 
money. But when they build that new 
New York-to-Florida highway it will 
pass right near Sudlersville. Then, 
I'm coming back and have a restau- 
rant on that corner. I want to serve 
good American food, and some good 
European food also. I don't know 
when this mad world will let us go 
back. But when Ileana and I do return 
we'll take our three sons — all Ameri- 
cans. We want them to grow up on 
Maryland's Eastern Shore with the 
best friends they could ever have. 



KELLER MAY RETIRE 

Charley Keller, former Maryland 
baseball great, who was with the New 
York Yankees for 11 seasons and who 
for the past two years was with the 
Detroit Tigers, may be forced to quit 
the game. He has been bothered by a 
£>pine injury that led to an operation 
and his leaving the Yanks. 

He is at his home in Frederick. 



[52] 




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Joe Tydings Elected 

AT ANNAPOLIS, Young Demo- 
crats of Maryland concluded 
their biennial convention with the elec- 
tion of Joseph I). Tyding-s (Arts-Law 
'51), son of the former Senator (Engi- 
neering B.S. '10; Law LL.B. '13; Hon- 
ciary LL.B. '33), as National Com- 
mitteeman. 

Tydings was instrumental in head- 
ing off a resolution acidly denouncing 
Republicans in general for their tactics 
in unseating his father. 

Later he comfortably weathered op- 
position to his candidacy for one of two 
Maryland berths in the Young Demo- 
crats' national committee. 

A contest that had been brewing over 
presidency of the State organization 
wound up peacefully with the unani- 
mous election of State's Attorney 
James C. Morton, Jr., of Anne Arundel 
County. 

A resolution was adopted urging 
Congress and the Maryland legislature 
to "strengthen" their corrupt practices 
laws. 

A need for tighter laws was demon- 
strated in the campaign last fall when 
Republican John Marshall Butler de- 
feated Millard E. Tydings' bid for re- 
election to the Senate, the resolution 
stated and continued, "The campaign 
met with general public disapproval, 
could undermine democracy and dis- 
courage good men from seeking office." 

The convention aimed a resolution at 
Gov. McKeldin's refusal to give up ad- 
ditional State funds to raise the pay 
of school teachers. 

Delegates unanimously adopted a 
resolution urging the legislature to tap 
a revenue source other than real estate 
taxes to provide teachers with better 
salaries. 

At Youngstown, O. 

A report from Youngstown, Ohio, 
states that Assistant City Law Direc- 
tor Israel Freeman, a graduate of the 
University Law School has been ap- 
pointed to the faculty of Youngstown 
College. He has been a member of the 
City Law Department staff for the past 
twelve years and has practised law in 
the town for thirty-one years. He is 
Editor of Opinions of the Court of Ap- 
peals and former editor of Dominion 
Law Reports. 



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Mr. Lappin 



DINING HALL 

The University dining hall has a new- 
look and as the year progresses, the 
look will become even newer, according 
to Mr. Lappin, dining hall manager. 

New features have 
been installed to 
speed up service and 
to beautify the 
grounds. 

The downstairs 
hallway of the build- 
ing will soon be con- 
verted into a stu- 
dent lounge. Decora- 
tions for the lounge 
will include photo- 
graphic murals of 
various campus 
scenes, taken by campus photographer 
Al Danneger. 

Boxwood will be planted in the circle 
along the front of the dining hall and 
beside the new wall built to conceal 
the delivery entrance. 

Although there has been an increase 
in the cost of campus housing, board 
costs for this semester will remain 
the same. Maryland is one of the few 
eastern colleges which did not increase 
board costs this year. 

Mr. Lappin said, "Although food 
prices have been increased, we hope 
to keep up the same quality of food 
as we have served in the past, and 
even better it." 

"Through demonstrations and classes, 
we hope to improve methods of cooking 
in quantity. Prominent chefs are being 
employed to come out to the University 
and give instructions to our cooking 
staff," the dining hall manager added 
To supplement the recordings played 
during meal hours, a tape recorder has 
been purchased to record speeches, pop- 
ular songs and other important events. 

With all of its gains, the dining hall 
will suffer one loss. Mrs. Ann R. Reed, 
catering manager and cafeteria super- 
visor, is taking a position as superin- 
tendent of the admissions office of the 
University branch in Heidelberg, Ger- 
many. 




THE KID'S GOOD! 

"So with that diploma now, all of a sudden, 
you know all the answers. In geography, for in- 
stance, can you tell me why the birth rate in 
Italy has increased so greatly in the past two 
years?" 

"Sure, because now Toni's Home Permanent." 

"O.K., so for sociology ; a man and woman 
worked together in a vaudeville act for ten 
years. After six years they were married. Then 
the girl sues for divorce. Since she knew the 
man for six years before marrying him, then, 
iiftcr four years called it off as a bad deal, why 
die 1 she marry him in the first place?" 

"The week they were married they were play- 
ing Pittsburgh and it rained all week." 




"Mr. Inertia, meet Mr. Krouse, one of my 
classmates at Maryland." 



AP SEZ "No. 7"! 

Following Maryland's sensational win 
over Georgia, AP's nationwide rankings 
poll jumped the Terps from No. 10 to 
7, Maryland receiving votes for FIRST 
place, viz:- 

FIRST 10 
(First place votes in parentheses) 

1. California (50) 1129 

2. Tennessee (26) 977 

3. Michigan State (16) 935 

4. Texas (6) 719 

5. Georgia Tech (12) 689 

6. Texas A. & M. (8) 652 

7. MARYLAND (14) 634 

8. Illinois (3) 584 

9. Princeton (1) 221 

10. Baylor 148 

SECOND 10 

11. Southern California 125 

12. Villanova 98 

13. Stanford 97 

14. Cornell 76 

1 5. Southern Methodist 67 

16. College Pacific 1) 65 

17. Ohio State 55 

lb. Northwestern 28 

IS. Oklahoma 26 

20. Washington 25 

Others: Notre Dame 24, Wisconsin 20, Cincin- 
nati 18, Auburn (1) 11, Tulane, Kentucky, San 
Francisco, Colorado and Michigan 5 each, Colum- 
bia, Marquette 4 each, Oregon State 2, Penn 
State, Kansas, South Dakota State, Washington 
& Lee 1 each. 

NCAA^TELEVISION PLAN 

In 1950, due to the rapid expansion 
of the home television audience, atten- 
dance at college football games showed 
a marked decline — in some instances 
nearly 30 %. Some colleges abolished the 
telecasting of their games, not only for 
the effect it had on their own attendance 
but also to protect the smaller colleges 
and high schools within the coverage 
area of the big game telecasts. Other 
colleges with outstanding teams and 
pre-season sell-outs were, of course, 
willing to sell their schedules to com- 
mercial advertisers. Since "football dol- 
lars" are the principal support of the 
overall, year-round athletic program of 
most colleges, television coverage of 
games could not be permitted to con- 
tinue on a disorganized basis. 

At the annual National Collegiate 
Athletic Association meeting in Dallas 
last January, a committee was ap- 
pointed to devise a plan whereby tele- 
vision and football could exist together. 
The 1951 Experimental Program is the 
result. T his year an analysis under 
"laboratory conditions" will be made 
of the football audience at home and at 
the game which should determine the 
future of "football in the home." 



Here is the plan: 

During the ten-week season (Septem- 
ber 22 to November 24) viewers in 52 
television areas will be able to watch 
seven Saturday afternoon football 
games. These games may be national 
(on a network basis), sectional, region- 
al or local. They comprise a better 
overall picture of national collegiate 
football than has ever been attempted. 
No college will be represented more 
than twice in the schedule. Some Sat- 
urdays, for instance, everybody will see 
the same game. The next Saturday, 
Eastern viewers may see a Midwestern 
game while Midwestern viewers are 
watching a big Eastern contest. 

The following week, the East may see 
an Eastern game and the Midwest one 
of its traditional rivalries. There will 
also be Saturdays when local games are 
telecast only over the local station. 
There will be three Saturdays in each 
of the areas when television of football 
will be "blacked-out." This is to give 
the National Opinion Research Center, 
which is conducting the survey, a 
chance to gauge the effect of home 
viewing on stadium attendance under 
all sorts of conditions. 

The plan does not interfere with 
other opportunities for the fan to see 
college football without going to the 
game. There will be theater television, 
post-game movies (in theaters and on 
television), as well as live pickups of 
games played on Friday nights and 
holidays. 



WOLFF AND DOUGLAS 

A ten-station network, covering 
Maryland and the Washington area 
and reaching into Delaware and West 
Virginia broadcasts Maryland's nine- 
game football schedule this fall. 

Sponsors of both the home and away 
games are the Maryland Chevrolet 
Dealers' Association and the Chevrolet 
Dealers' Association of the Metropolitan 
area. Contract negotiations were com- 
pleted with Ketchum, MacLeod, and 
Grove, Inc., advertising agency. 

The network includes stations WBOC, 
Salisbury; WFMD, Frederick; WITH, 
Baltimore; WEPM, Martinsburg, W. 
Va.; WJEJ, Hagerstown; WCEM, 
Cambridge; WNAV, Annapolis; 
WDOV, Dover, Del.; WRC, Washing- 
ton, D.C., and WASA, Havre de Grace. 

Bob Wolff and Steve Douglas an- 
nounce the games. Wolff handles the 
play-by-play while Douglas will do the 
color and other highlights as they hap- 
pen each Saturday. 

All home tilts and the Navy game in 
Baltimore begin at 2 p.m., w^ith radio 
time five minutes before each game. The 
Georgia game Oct. 13 is scheduled for 
S:15 from Athens, and the Louisiana 
State date, two weeks later, starts at 
9:15 E.S.T. 

• •••***•••••• 
THEODORE ROOSEVELT:— 

"The credit belo)igs to the man who 
is actually in the arena. His place shall 
never be with those cold and timid souls 
who have tasted neither victory nor 
./< feat." 



[54] 



BASKETBALL 

Coach Bud Millikan 
1951-52 Varsity Schedule 



Dec. 3 Virginia 

"Dec. 5 Washington and Lee 

Dec. 8 Pennsylvania 

*Dec. 12 William and Mary 

Dec. 15 West Virginia 

Dec. 18 V.M.I. 

Dec. 19 Washington and Lee 

Jan. 3 North Carolina 

Jan. 5 Navy 

'Jan. 7 Virginia 

'Jan. 10 Georgetown 

Jan. 12 Rutgers 

Jan. 18 North Carolina 

Feb. 9 V.M.I. 

Feb. 14 Richmond 

Feb. 16 William and Mary 

Feb. 18 Duke 

Feb. 21 Georgetown 

Feb. 27 Richmond 

: Feb. 29 George Washington 

"Mar. 1 Davidson 

*Home Games at College Park. 




WRESTLING 



ARYLAND'S wrestling 
team, says Coach Sully 
Krouse, will be strong- 
est in the 147, 157, 167, 
and 175-pound classes 
with veterans Capt. 
Joel Adelberg, Sid 
Cohen, and Jack Shana- 
han returning along with five un- 
defeated members of last year's fresh- 
man squad, Carl Everly, Ernie and Bob 
Fisher, Cliff Mathews, and Rod Norris. 
In addition the squad will be 
strengthened by the new rule allowing 
freshmen to participate in varsity 
sports. 

Expansion of the athletic department 
has enabled the wrestlers to obtain im- 
proved facilities in the rear of the 
Coliseum. 

The schedule: 

*Dec. 15 — West Virginia. 
Jan. 5 — Loyola. 
Jan. 12 — Navy 
*Feb. 2— Penn State. 
Feb. 9— Duke. 
*Feb. 13 — Johns Hopkins. 
*Feb. 22— North Carolina. 

Mar. 1— V.M.I. 
*Mar. 7 and 8 — Southern Confer- 
ence Meet. 



*At College Park. 



KELLY KLOCKS 'EM 

John L. Kelly of the Terp rifle team 
was top man in the 100-yard telescopic 
sights event at the Camp Perry small 
bore rifle championships. Kelly fired a 
perfect 400. 



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"As Thousands Cheer" 



FOOTBALL SUS 



Tatuniterps Swamp Washington & Lee, 
George Washington and Georgia 




MARYLAND 54; W. & L. 14 

ARYLAND opened the 
1951 football season 
with a power-studded 
54-14 win over Wash- 
ington and Lee. Jim 
Tatum's Terrapins 
made few mistakes as 
they swamped George 
Barclay's Generals at Lexington. 

Maryland led, 21-0 before the Generals 
scored and at halftime had a 27-7 mar- 
gin. The Terps added a touchdown in 
the fourth, the last by the highly 
touted Cumberland freshman, Lynn 
Beightol. 

W. and L. scored in the second period 
when the Terps fumbled on their own 
six-yard line and in the finale on a do- 
or-die 70-yard pass play. 

Maryland showed only what was 
necessary offensively, scouts from Geor- 
gia, North Carolina and other future 
foes being present, little black books in 
hand. Tatum used four quarterbacks, 
the Terps scoring under each, three 
times for Jack Scarbath. 

Maryland rolled up 400 yards on the 
ground to 39 for the Generals, but 
W. and L. made 210 yards through the 
air. 




THE TERPS IN 1893 

This photo comes to these pages from Clifton E. Fuller, of Cumberland, an old Maryland 

quarterback. He was a member of this team but was unavailable for the photographer. This team 

wore pearl and maroon, Maryland's first colors. 

1. Kimer 5. Harrison, J. R. 9. Sherman 13. Strickler 

2. Weimer 6. Crapster 10. Pugh 14. Mithcell 

3. (Unidentified) 7. Keys 11. Harrison (Prof.) 15. Wharton 

4. Harding 8. Bannon 12. Compton 16. Wooters 

17. Rollins 



Heffner's punt for Maryland rolled 
to the W. and L. two-yard line. Broyles 
fumbled in the end zone as Ward hit 
him and Ladygo recovered to score. 




SB*-"- 



THEY WERE CHAMPS TOO 

The Terrapins of 1894 and 1895. State Champions 

1. Wharton 4. Walker 8. Bannon 

2. C E. Fuller 5. Wooters 9. Millison 

3. Timanico 6. Harding 10. Compton 

7. Mullikcn 11. Harris 

This picture comes to these pages through the courtesy of Alumnus Clifton E 
quarterback from Cumberland. 



1 2. Lewis 

13. Harrison 

14. Blackiston 

Fuller, Maryland 



Maryland made it 14-0 in the first 
period on a 14-yard southpaw pass 
from Felton to Lindsay climaxing a 
70-yard drive. Scarbath's 42-yard pass 
to Lindsay accounted for most of it. 

It was 21-0 when Fullerton went 11 
yards with a pitchout from Scarbath 
after Shemonski and Ed Modzelewski 
set up the score. W. and L. scored as 
the Terps fumbled on their own six. 

Ed Modzelewski scored from the one 
to end a 70-yard drive before half-time, 
with Hanulak setting it up with passes. 

Mighty Mo, the only player to make 
two touchdowns, scored again in the 
third. Kensler had set up the score by 
intercepting a pass. 

Barritt's 41-yard dash was made just 
a minute after the fourth quarter start- 
ed for a 41-7 lead. The Generals re- 
plied with a 70-yard touchdown pass 
play. 

The Terps passed twice in the last 
half, one for a touchdown, De Stefano 
to Fox from 13 yards out to end a 
67-yard drive. The last Maryland touch- 
down was by Beightol. He carried three 
times from the 14-yard line and went 
over on the third try. 

Sophomore Barritt was Maryland's 
top ground gainer with 72 yards in 
eight tries, while the versatile Fullerton 
made 67 in nine trips and Modzelewski 
61 yards in 10 tries. 

Ward, Ail-American guard, made no 
mistakes. He was downfield fast and 
blocked to perfection. Dick Modzelewski 
excelled for the Terps defensively, and 
Fry offensively and defensively. Sopho- 
mores Jones and Stankus were also red 
hot in the line. 



[56] 



Maryland 33; George Washington 6 

The Tatumterps shot the works early 
to mark up four fast touchdowns against 
George Washington's surprisingly good 
opposition and even more surprising 
latter-stage reserve strength that 
fought Maryland right down to the 
final gun, the Terps winning, 33-6. 

The George Washingtons who were 
rated as having to do it with eleven 
little hatchets or not at all, scored 
their first touchdown of the season with 
b minute and 20 seconds to go. Thus 
the second half provided 6 points for 
each team. 

A crowd of 25,732 attended, as the 
thermometer registered 88°. 

Maryland moved 47 yards in five 
plays to score as Ed Modzelewski 
bulled through for 12 and 18-yard 
gains. A pass from Scarbath to Felton 
set it up. 

Ed Modzelewski scored again when 
he and Scarbath executed a perfect 
trap play and Mo scampered 62 yards 
into pay dirt. 

Faloney was the terp quarterback on 
the two scores in the second. He scored 
from two yards out after a 39-yard 
drive. 

Faloney-to-Fullerton produced the 
fourth tally on a 28-yard pass. Fal- 
oney, trapped, ran wide and tossed a 
bullet to Fullerton, who took it on the 
10 for a score. 

In the second half three straight 
passes, two by Shemonski and one by 
Scarbath, missed. 

GW halted by Terp defense after 
early gains by Davis, and passes by 
Davis and Cilento to Belliveau, was in- 
effective on offense through the second 
quarter and most of the third, and 
Maryland thus came back to score on 
a 37-yard drive when Scarbath passed 
to Felton in the end zone. Decker made 
good on three kicks and missed two. 

George Washington was on the Terps' 
23 when it ended. 

Ed Modzelewski of the Terps gained 
59 more yards rushing than the entire 
GW offensive, with a 139-yard total. 
GW completed 11 passes. The Terps 
tossed 20 passes, but completed only 9. 

Dick Modzelewski starred for the 
Terp line and is learning that the pub- 
licity goes to brother Ed, a ball carrier. 
In the coaches' room the talk was of 
Dick Mo, of the Terp line. 

Co-captain Dave Cianelli, injured, sat 
on the side lines in mufti. Two big 
reasons for scant GW yardage were 
Paul Nestor and Martin Crytzer. Fresh- 
man Joe Horning made the day's best 
return with an interception, a brilliant 
run in which he reversed his field twice. 
The play was called back for offsides. 
Ed Fullerton was the closest to a 60- 
minute man. Bodous of GW and Cliff 
Trexler of the Terps got their sports 
mixed and squared off. It cost Mary- 
land 15 yards. 

GW's Andy Davis was not particu- 
larly outstanding, but it probably was 
because he was called on to do so much. 

Twice the Colonials called time out 
to patch Andy's injuries, and send him 
in again. He deserves a great deal of 
credit for the game he played. He's 
usually a 60-minute guy and the Terp 
squad praised him highly. 



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FLORISTS' CHOICE 

"Miss Football Corsage of 1951" was the title 
bestowed by florists upon vivacious Mary Corder 
of Washington, D.C. The capital cutie won her 
letter with the florists' varsity when she used the 
big yellow chrysanthemum to decorate her fall 
coat appropriately for the Maryland rooting sec- 
tion. Pigskin posy is suggested for loyal rooters. 
Most school colors can be matched in fall flow- 
ers, or duplicated with the aid of vegetable dye. 



Commissioner Donohue 

Commissioner F. Joseph Donohue, of 
Washington, D.C, spoke at a pep rally 
prior to the game and proved to be 
more than capable of instilling pep. 

The rally audience did nothing that 
would do other than boost the school's 
prestige. 

"They were perfect ladies and gentle- 
men with proper school spirit and de- 
serve bigger and better pep rallies as 
the season progresses," said Cal Quin- 
stedt, rally committee head. "We in- 
tend to do everything possible to main- 
tain such a fine turnout," Quinstedt 
promised. 

Steve Douglas, Washington radio 
star, emceed the rally, which was re- 
puted to be the best attended pep 
function held at the University for 
some time. 

Maryland 43; Georgia 7 
Even the most optimistic Terp foot- 
ball crystal gazer hardly anticipated 
marching through Georgia to the tune 
of 43 to 7, the most consummate paint 
brush job ever handed the Bulldogs in 
their home kennel. 

That just isn't being done, Suh'. 

Georgia learns just aren't evnh beaten that badly, Suhl 

It was a perfect evening for the Jim 
Tatumterps as they did everything as 
right as rain. The Terp forward wall 
K'ave a perfect imitation of the Rock of 
Gibraltar. Alert Terps hauled Georgia 
fireball passes out of the air and fell 
on the few but costly Georgia fumbles. 

If Jim Tatum's gridsters weren't the 
perfect team this night under the Geor- 

[58] 



gia moon, they sho' 'nuf came maghty 
ciose to bein' jist about that! Maryland 
was in that driver's seat right down the 
middle of the big road from Alfred to 
Omaha, from Decker's field goal in the 
opener to Fullerton's 86-yard canter 
in the finale. 

The high men on the Tatum pole tal- 
lied at least once each quarter, while 
Georgia's vaunted Bratowski aerial at- 
tack executed a brilliant array of short 
shots which turned out, however, to 
be gestures of utter futility because 
the Terps had made it "Nellie, bar the 
door!" on the long ones with the score 
board numbers attached. 

The game had barely started when, 
after moving 41 yards over the terrain, 
the Terps were stymied on the 20 and 
Decker hoisted a field goal for 3 digits. 

A few minutes later Dick Modzelew- 
ski, (he, Ward, Morgan, Cianelli, Al- 
derton and Kensler ruined Georgia's 
offense), fell on a Bulldog fumble, a 
family affair which brother Ed Mo took 
over after a pass from Shemonski to 
Weidensaul. 10-0. 

In the second the Terps went 72 
yards in 6 plays, terminating as Felton 
scored. 17-0. 

Georgia retaliated following a pass 
interception and a 50-yard march. 17-7. 

In the third the Terps fumbled. Geor- 
gia recovered. Faloney then snicker- 
sneed a Georgia pass and Scarbath 
sneaked across the line. 24-7. 

The Terps' "Hanulak from Hacken- 
sack" ripped the door off of tht hinges 
with two more TD's, the second one 
after a 50-yard gambol. 34-7. 

In the fourth Ail-American Bobby 
Ward fashioned a nice big barn door 
labeled for exclusive use of Terp back 
fieldsters. Ed Fullerton, by many rated 
as the best man on the field in this 
clambake, accepted Ward's gesture and 
galloped 86 yards to inspect the famil- 
iar real estate laid out behind the 
Georgia goal posts. 

Everything was peaches down in 
Georgia where the better informed folk 
now are fully convinced of the verity 
of Aesop's fable about terrapins being 
located on all ends of the line. It was 
here a Terp, there a Terp, everywhere 
a Terp, Terp, particularly in parts 
where Georgia was a fixin' fo' to go or 
a-fixin' fo' to fling that ball. GEORGE! 

Six to Go 
'Oct. 20— North Carolina 

Oct. 27— L.S.U. (night) 
*Nov. 3 — Missouri (Homecoming) 
**Nov. 10— Navy 

Nov. 17— N.C. State (Dad's Day) 
* Nov. 24 — West Virginia 



Games at College Park 

"*Navy at Baltimore 



TERP HARRIERS TOP TARS 

Maryland's cross-country team won 
28th straigh meet, defeating Navy, 
26-29. Maryland's last cross-country 
defeat came from Navy in '47. 

Tyson Creamer was first home in 21 
minutes, 6 seconds. He was followed 
by Cooke of Navy, and Terps Buehler 
and Tibbetts. 



SOCCER 

By Stan Rubenstein 



ARYLAND's round-ball 
booters, under Coach 
Doyle, announces this 
year's schedule as fol- 
lows: - 

Oct. 11— Wash. & Lee 
*Oct. 19— Loyola 
*Oct. 24— Penn. State 
2 — North Carolina State 
7 — Johns Hopkins 
Nov. 16 — U. of Connecticut 
Nov. 19 — North Carolina 
Nov. 20 — Duke University 




*Nov. 
Nov. 



*At College Park 

Soccer Coach Doyle Royal has de- 
cided to take up conversational Span- 
ish. Of the fifty candidates drilling 
for the eight-game soccer schedule over 
half hail from "South of the Border." 

The Conference champs have only 
lost five players from last year's squad, 
but they included such stalwarts as 
All-American Jim Belt, Tom Bourne, 
and Russ Lucos. To make the outlook 
bright, returning are last year's goal 
tenders, Joe Baer and Bob Butehorn 
and Fullback Don Sodeberg. 

Other veterans include Jim Savage, 
Bill Fell, Bob Krebs, Bob McKenzie, 
Mort Fox, Tom Hamilton, Ernie Balla- 
deres, Ken Hildreth, Ernie Plutcheck, 
Dave Williams, and Hector Salinas who 
last year paced the freshman's squad. 
Terps 2; Generals 1 

With their sights set on a third 
straight Southern Conference soccer 
championship, the Terrapin booters 
opened the 1951 season with a 2-1 vic- 
tory over Washington & Lee. The de- 
feat of W & L marked the ninth 
straight conference win for the Terps, 
a new Maryland record. 

Jim Savage, leading the Maryland 
attack from his forward position, scored 
both of the Liners' goals Jim is a 
member of the large South American 
delegation on the Maryland soccer team. 

Coach Doyle Royal's men played on 
even terms with the General's during 
the first period of play, but Savage 
managed to break the deadlock in the 
second quarter with the Terp's first 
score of the season. 

Maryland's second goal, the margin 
of victory, came in the third frame 
when Savage took advantage of a pen- 
alty kick to put the ball in the W & L 
net. 

Aside from the two successful shots 
at the goal by the Terps, there were 
eight other tries for a score that kept 
General goalie Carl Rumpp busy. The 
Old Line gold was defended ably 
throughout the game by veteran Erie 
Baer. 

The lone Washington and Lee score 
of the contest came in the final period 
when Horace Dietrich edged one past 
the Terp defenders. 

• •• ********** 
THEODORE ROOSEVELT:— 

"Only the shots that HIT are shots 
that count." 




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BOXING 

Coach Frank Cronin 
1952 Varsity Schedule 

Feb. 1— The Citadel 
: Feb. 9 — Quantico Marines 
Feb. 16— Miami 
Feb. 23— Army 

Feb. 29 — Michigan State 
: Mar. 8 — South Carolina 
Mar. 15— L.S.U. 
Mar. 22— Open 

Mar.. 29— So. Inv. Tourn. at LSU 
Apr. 5 — NCAA Tour, at Wisconsin 



"Four home meets at College Park. 
Promising Talent 

f— *_ ARYLAND's '52 ring 
La ?rM season, just around 
tjfljki t' 11 ' corner, finds Coach 
■/ jjjl Frank Cronin, facing 
..»/« tOS n ^ s nrst year as top 
mentor, confronted 
with a few "ifs." 
Former Head Coach 
Miller turned over what he believes to 
be the best array of talent to ever 
grace a Terp ring roster, but Cronin 
is concerned about academic eligibility 
of some of the mittsters and the weight 
of others. 

Many close college bouts are won 
in the last round. The key to that one 
lies in early and arduous road work, 
to get the legs "under" and the wind 
"inside." Early road work also pro- 
vides a line on making weight at a 
boxing level where you "make it or 
else." 

In college boxing circles generally, 
Maryland has always been credited 
with fielding hard punching teams in 
top notch physical condition predicated 
on taking that last round and not run- 
ning out of gas. 

If Buddy Seymour, former Illinois 
high school star, can make 135 that 
bracket will be well taken care of. 




Die Mutter: "So you're home from College Park 
and you couldn't even make the boxing team?" 

K. O. Pantzhanger: "Coach Cronin said I 
might have made it if 1 didn't get my sports 
mixed all the time. I had it confused with both 
football and track." 

Madre: "How was that?" 

K.O.P. : "Coach Cronin said I intercepted too 
many forward passes and he did not like the 
many occasions on which I did ten seconds flat." 

(The dope could do even worse by getting his 
sports mixed with music. For instink, he could 
get in there and "Take a Number From One to 
Ten" or "Meet Me Tonight in Dreamland.") 



[60] 



At 125 — unless it is agreed between 
opposing teams that 118 will be used 
in this Olympic year, the Terps have 
Gerry Garber, an all-Army title holder 
who looks like a great bet for top 
honors, and up and coming little Snor- 
ky Letzer, who can do 125 but not the 
118 Garber could make with ease. 

Al Glass, who sat out last year, and 
Letzer will be around at 130. They're 
both good. 

Red hot and a mean baby to lather 
at 145 is Garry Fisher, Maryland State 
champion. He does not figure to do 
any losing. At that weight is also Bill 
O'Brien, who has been away in the 
Marines. Bill, however, may go out 
for 155. Bob Theofield, who just did 
fail to make last year's good team, is 
a real candidate for 145 or 155 and 
in that bracket is also the North Caro- 
lina boy, Bill McGinness, former na- 
tional Scholastic champion as well as 
title winner in the Carolinas' Golden 
gloves, a two-state classic of real pro- 
portions. Billy also won the Piedmont 
Golden Gloves. 

Probably starting at 165 and about 
the same weight as McGinness is Texas' 
Ronny Rhodes, a lad who, like McGin- 
ness, Garber, Fisher and Seymour pro- 
vided the five-way "news story" of the 
daisy that bit the cow. All four of 
them scouted and chose Maryland. 

Rhodes, at 17, was the winner of 17 
bouts including the Texas Open Ama- 
teur 160-pound championship. He is 
a topflight student and looks that part. 
Once the bell tinkles he is every inch 
a classy, natural student of ringman- 
ship. Rhodes, from Abilene, and others 
of Maryland's team have been keeping 
in shape by training at home during 
the summer. 

At 175 Coach Cronin has Davy Ortel, 
a fine prospect, and Cal Quenstedt, 
good boy from last year's team. Foster 
Bonner, Fairfax Hi star of last year's 
freshman team, went to the Army and 
George Fuller, last year's heavy is in 
the Coast Guard. 

A 175-pound newcomer with plenty 
of home training and guidance but no 
previous competition is very promising 
Jimmy Monohan, from New York and 
Baltimore. He's just as Irish looking 
as his name indicates and he likes to 
box. Larry LoPrete, ex-Marine from 
Long Island, will also try again. 

Heading a trio of heavies who will 
try for the first string is Jim Stewart, 
who did some competitive boxing, suc- 
cessfully, in the Marine Corps. This 
class also has beginners in Bill Dovell, 
196, and Burt Merriam, 206. 

Charlie Hight will be this year's team 
manager. 

In Indiana 

Colonel Harvey L. Miller, USMC 
(Ret.), Director of Publications and 
Publicity at the University of Mary- 
land, will be the guest speaker for the 
Indiana Foremen's Club 1951 Sports 
Night, taking place this year at Rich- 
mond, Indiana, on 14 November 1951. 

He will speak on "The Objective 
Values of Boxing as a National Sport," 
the first time, in this annual series, 
that boxing will have been a speaker's 
subject. 



Silver Spring 
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7925 GEORGIA AVENUE, Opposite Hot Shoppe 
SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



Established 1935 



The Citizens Bank of Takoma Park 

Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

Takoma Park, Maryland 



52 Years 

Colonel Miller was reappointed, for 
the 12th consecutive time, Executive 
Secretary of the National Boxing As- 
sociation, following the recent 32nd 
annual NBA convention in Chicago. 
This marks his 52nd year of active 
association with the ring sport. 
Japan and Germany 

Miller was recently selected by Army 
Special Services as one of a small group 
of boxing officials to conduct clinics 
for Army boxers in Japan and Ger- 
many. Reluctantly, with request for a 
"rain check," he declined both of these 
assignments because of dead-line pub- 
lications assignments at this particular 
time. 

'52 Olympic Finals 

The A.A.U. Olympic boxing finals for 
positions on the U. S. Olympic Team, 
take place in Kansas City, Missouri, 
June 16 to 18, 1952, both inclusive. 

Regional finals will take place, under 
A.A.U. rules and auspices, in various 
parts of the country. 

The N.C.A.A. Nationals at Wisconsin 
will constitute Olympic Collegiate fin- 
als, the winners qualifying for the 
Kansas City Tournament. 




WISE OWL 

Potato Chips 

Distributors 

10753 Colesville Road 

Silver Spring, Md. 



Collegiate boxers who do not take 
part in the N.C.A.A. finals at Wiscon- 
sin are eligible to compete in A.A.U. 
regional and final bouts without jeopar- 
dizing their Collegiate standings. 

N.C.A.A. finals will be at Olympic 
weights with 112 (flyweight) and 118 
(bantamweight) added. These two 
v eights may be included in dual moots 
by mutual agreement. 

At Cape May 

George Fuller, former Maryland 
heavyweight boxer, who enlisted in the 
Coast Guard, was the star lineman in 
a recent football win of the Cape May 
Coast Guard team over the Bainbridge 
Navy aggregation. 



[61] 



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"Mama Rabbit was: proud of son Bunny's f.rst day at school. 
In one day he'd learned to multiply." 



FOR many years 
artists and dood- 
lers have been draw- 
ing pictures of ter- 
rapins of various 
descriptions. This 
goes back to before 
Pearl Harbor — yeah 
even before Pearl 
White and back, yet, 
to the days when 
the Statue of Liber- 
ty held a torch in- 
stead of the w.k. bag 
or even before the 
dead sea first took 
sick, or Professor Quigley picked his 
first chicken. Always, we assume, these 
pictured terps have been males. Not 
fast mails. Just males. They've been 
pictured running this-away and that- 
away, but no one ever pictured what 
all these terrapins were running after. 
No one ever pictured a terrapette. As 
of right now cometh Steve Forris, in 
Publications. Steve corrects this by un- 
veiling, for the first time on any stage, 
a terrapette. Her name's Testudette 
and, from now on, s'help us Steve, she'll 
grace these pages frequently. 




Speaking of terps these columns 
plead guilty to plagiarism in pinching 
all funny gags, stories or verses using 
the word "turtles" and converting them 
to "terrapins." But a recent verse 
stumped us because changing "turtle" 
to "Terrapin," it comes out here: - 

The terrapin's in armor plates, 
Yet flourishes and propagates, 
We've always wondered how the 

terrapin, 
In such a fix could be so ferrapin. 



Jim Braddock, tells a Jersey (that is 
Joisey), story about turtles. On the 
night he handed Max Baer a free box- 
ing lesson for which Maryland's first 
coach, Original Kid Sullivan ('10) 
would have charged $16.50 plus amuse- 
ment tax, Braddock phoned the Missus 
at home in Jersey, "Mom, keep the kids 
up. I'm bringing home the title." When 
ho burst into the door with, "I won!" 
the kids began to cry. Asked "Why the 
weeps?", they replied, "But where, Pop, 
where's the 'toitle'?" 



Readers are not expected to believe 
this but a proud popper crashed through 
with a request for a room and board 
job to help his crown prince through 
school, adding, "We can raise enough 
money to pay for his intuition?" (He'd 
probably have to raise plenty.) 

Farmers on the Eastern Sho' have 
waxed so unreasonable that they want 
to raise their own crops on their own 
land without saying anything to any- 
body in Washington. 



He was done with dames! 
Said, "They cheat and lie, 
"They prey on guys 
"To the day we die. 
"They tease us and torment 
"And drive us to sin. . . ." 
"George! Look at the pip 
"That just walked in!" 



A wolf is a guy who goes out only 
with girls who wear glasses. When he 
breaths on them they can't see. 



Alumnus got a wire from his wife in 
another city:- "I just gave birth to a 
nine-pound boy. Truly yours, Gertrude." 



For two hours Rover spun in a circle, 
trying to catch his tail. He finally 
made it and remarked, "This is the 
end of me." 



Puns and coffee, riddles and syrup, 
speeches and scream. 



Said the he-firefly to the she-firefly: 
"You glow your way and Pll glow 
mine." A moment later he backed into 
an electric fan and remarked: "De- 
lighted, no end." 



Cumberland Carrie: "I caught my boy 
friend necking." 

Hagerstown Hannah: "I caught mine 
the same way." 



Sweetie — "I love to go to dances, so 
I can hug you close to me." 

Salty — "Let's not dance. Let's just 
play we're dancing." 



Guy in a nudist camp admiring one 
of his feminine "classmates," remarked, 
"Betcha she'd look great in a sweater." 



A man was attracted by screams 
coming from a house. He found a fran- 
tic mother whose son had swallowed 
a nickel. Seizing the boy by the heels, 
he held him up, gave him a few shakes, 
and the coin dropped out on the floor. 

The grateful mother was lost in ad- 
miration. "You certainly knew how to 
get it out of him," she said. "Are you 
a doctor?" 

"No, madam" he replied. "I am from 
Internal Revenue." 



A tree is something that will stand 
by the side of the road for fifty years 
and then suddenly jump in front of a 
careless driver. 



Want ad from Up-State: Farmer 
wants to meet marriageable girl with 
tractor. Please send photo of tractor. 

Heard at the dairy: "Say, there are 
small pieces of wood in this cheese!" 

"What did you expect? It's cottage 
cheese!" 



[62] 



Maryland nurse describing an air 
raid. "When the bombers came over 
I dove into the nearest wolf hole." 

"You mean foxhole?" asked her 
audience. 

"Maybe a fox dug it," she replied, 
"but there was a wolf in it." 



A parasite is a beezark who goes 
through a revolving door without push- 
ing. 



Meow! "Was her father surprised 
when the feller proposed marryin' her! 
Why he nearly dropped his shotgun!" 



Cow sued for a divorce, claiming she 
got a bum steer. 



LETTER. "Dear Dean Griffelgreifer:- 
Please you should wrote undt told me 
how is mine sohn, Ewald, making oudt, 
as a student, in his studies." 

— "Ludwig Verdaungsmittel" 

ANSWER. "Lieber Herr Verdaungs- 
mittel:- As a student, your sohn, Ewald, 
vill surely go down in history. How- 
ever, maybe in lengvidges und metti 
jmettics he vill pull up vit pessing marks 
so he choost gets by." 

— "Siegfried Griffelgreifer, Dean" 



"Has he come from heaven?" asked 
the junior terp, gazing at his newly 
arrived brother. 

"Yes, dear," replied his mother (H.- 
Ec. '49). 

Replied the Crown prince, "No won- 
der they put him out." 



"Gonna be busy tonight?" 
"I dunno, yet. It's my first date since 
arriving at Maryland. 



"Oh she couldn't be a sweater girl! 
She can't knit." 



Garrett County feller, noticing a 
friend with a lantern, asked him where 
he was going. 

"Courtin'." 

"With a lantern? I never used one." 

"Yeah — and look what you got!" 



Alumnus went to the University hos- 
pital for observation. Wanted to ob- 
serve a nurse there. 



Her: "Do you have to drive with one 
arm?" 

Him: "Sure. You don't think this 
car can steer itself, do you?" 



Near sighted snake that eloped with 
a rope. 



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spenked you." 

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BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADM. 

(Concluded from Page 49) 
States and on the Island of Espiritu 
Sante, in the New Hebrides, in the 
South Pacific. At Maryland, he was ac- 
tive in the Canterbury Club and Persh- 
ing Rifles. He is now a member of St. 
Andrews Society of Scotchmen and the 
Masons. His wife is the former Pa- 
tricia W. Patterson of Baltimore, also 
a 1948 graduate of the University. 

1949 — James Edward Haines, whose 
home is in Silver Spring, Md., and who 
majored in industrial management at 
Maryland, is now associated with 
Standard Engineering Company of 
Washington. After two and a half 
years at Maryland studying chemical 
engineering, he was called to active 
duty in June, 1943. He attended Offi- 
cers' Candidate School at Ft. Benning, 
Ga., graduating in September, 1944. 
He participated in the Rhineland and 



with James A. Meeser Company of 
Washington and the Watson Company 
of Bowie, Md., wholesale plumbing and 
heating supplies concerns. He attended 
Maryland from September, 1941, to 
February, 1943, when he entered the 
Signal Corps as first lieutenant. Dur- 
ing World War II, he served 20 months 
in the Asiatic-Pacific Theater, and re- 
ceived the Asiatic-Pacific ribbon with 
one battle star, Philippine Liberation 
Medal with bronze star, Occupation 
Medal of Japan, Meritorious Service 
Unit plaque and Victory Medal. He re- 
turned to the University in September, 
1946, to complete his studies in indus- 
trial management. At Maryland, he 
was affiliated with Phi Delta Theta 
Fraternity. He is married to the former 
Susie Thomas of Charlotte Hall, Md. 
(Editor's Note — Current items con- 
cerning alumni of the College of Busi- 
ness and Public Administration are fee- 




Central Germany campaigns, being 
decorated with the Purple Heart with 
oak leaf cluster, Distinguished Unit 
Badge and Bronze Star Medal, and at- 
tained the rank of first lieutenant. He 
is a member of the Masons and Ancient 
Arabic Order of Nobles of the Mystic 
Shrine. His wife is the former Janet 
G. Hare of Baltimore. 

1949— Roderick D. Watson, Jr., a 
resident of Greenbelt, Md., is associated 
ing sought. Present history records, 



except for recent graduates, are sev- 
eral years old, and many changes have 
occurred in the lives of our alumni. 
The Alumni Secretary will be glad to 
receive new information for publica- 
tion, and will furnish blank history 
record forms upon request. News item* 
and notes of achievement concerning 
alumni will be gratefully received. To 
a marked degree, this column will be 
just as interesting to alumni as they 
themselves help make it.) 




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[64] 




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Vol. XXIII January-February 1952 No. 2 



M 



ARYLAND 

PUBLICATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY •• MARYLAND 
ALUMNI 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, Col- 
lege Park, Md., as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 
$3.00 per year. Fifty cents the copy. 



HARVEY L. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Marvland 

College Park, Md. 



MAXINE DAYTON BARKER 

Circulation Manager 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



SALLY LADIN OGDEN, Advertising Director 

3333 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
Officers 

Talbot T. Speer "17, President Miss Sarah E. Morris '24, Vice-President 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12, Vice President David L. Brigham '38, Executive Secretary 

Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE— Abram Z. Gottwals '38, J. Homer Remsberg '18, Dr. Howard L. Stier '32. Lee W. 

Adkins '42 (alternate). 
ARTS & SCIENCES— Frederick S. DeMarr '49, Loy M. Shipp, Jr. '43. William H. Press '28. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— Egbert F. Tingley '27, Talbot T. Speer '17. N. S. 

Sinclair '43. 
EDUCATION— Mrs. Florence Duke '50. Miss Joan Mattinglv '51, Donald Malev '50. 
ENGINEERING— Col. O. H. Saunders '10, S. Chester Ward '32. G. V. Koons '29. 

HOME ECONOMICS— Mrs. Mary R. Langford '26, Miss Ruth McRae '27. Mrs. Hilda Jones Nystatin 
DENTAL — Thomas J. Bland. Jr. '17. Arthur I. Bell 19. C. Adam Bock '22. 
MEDICAL— Thurston R. Adams '34, John A. Wagner '38, William H. Triplett 11. 
LAW— John G. Turnbull '32, John G. Prendergast '33, G. Kenneth Reiblich. 
NURSING— Flora Street, Pres. '38, Mrs. Eva Farley '27. June E. Geiser '47. 
PHARMACY— Francis P. Balassone "25, Morris Cooper '26, Joseph Cohen "29. 

Clubs 

BALTIMORE CLUB— Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12. "M" CLUB— Joseph H. Deckman '31. 
NEW YORK CLUB— Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. EX-OFFICIO— Dr. H. C. Bvrd '08. President. 

CUMBERLAND CLUB— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. University of Maryland: David L. Brigham. 

'38, Exec. Sect'y.. Alumni Association. 



[1] 









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MARYLAND'S 27th AMIDAL HOMECOMING 



<* Pm \r # l \- * * : * * * * * uJHflftf to to M» 4J L Ji ' * A; -. \ -' - ■ * 




Talented Tipton Stringer crowned Queen. "Fifty Year Keys" Awarded as Veteran Old 
Grads Return. Victory Song Featured on Vaughn Monroe National Radio Program. 

23,612 Witness Grid Defeat of Missouri. 

By Mary Davis Byrne '5ft 




Byrne 



DESPITE rain and snow flurries 
which put a damper on Mary- 
land's Homecoming festivities, 23,612 
fans turned out for the Missouri game. 
Among those who witnessed the 35-0 
Maryland victory were almost 5,000 
alumni. 

The old grads were unable to view 
the Homecoming pa- 
rade and house dec- 
orations, which were 
postponed because 
of bad weather, but 
showed up in force 
at the General 
Alumni Luncheon 
and the Alumni 
Mixer. At the 
Luncheon they 
heard short talks by 
President Byrd and 
President Talbot 
Speer of the Alumni Association and, 
led by the Men's Glee Club, joined in 
singing Maryland songs. Following 
the luncheon, the Reunion Classes and 
the Alumni Clubs from Baltimore, 
Pittsburgh, New York and Cumberland 
went in a body to the stadium. 
Queen Tippy 
In pre-game ceremonies, Miss Tip- 
ton Stringer, representing Delta Delta 
Delta, was crowned Homecoming Queen 
by Judge William P. Cole, Chairman 
of the Board of Regents. She was 
selected from a group of 25 candidates 
representing dormitories, sororities, 
and other campus organizations by 
Patti Cavin, Women's columnist for the 
Washington Times-Herald; H u n k 
Walker, staff photographer for Life; 
and Ollie Atkins, staff photographer 
for the Saturday Evening Post. 

An attractive honey blond, Miss 
Stringer is undoubtedly one of the 
busiest and most accomplished girls on 
campus. The day before being crowned 
Homecoming Queen, Tippy had won a 
chance to appear on NBC's coast-to- 
coast broadcast of the Philip Morris 
Playhouse, with $250 and a trip to New 
York included. During the week follow- 
ing her crowning, she starred in Room 
Service, the University Theatre's first 
play of the year. 

A senior majoring in drama, "A" 
student Tippy has appeared in Faith 
of Our Fathers and in U.T. productions 
of Caesar and Cleopatra and Macbeth 



as well as on radio and TV shows in 
the Washington area. She was Princess 
Maryland at the 1951 Winchester, Va. 
Apple Blossom Festival and last year 
won first prize in a University charcoal 
drawing contest. 

While holding the ingenue lead in 
Faith of Our Fathers Miss Stringer 
also worked in the circulation depart- 
ment of a Silver Spring newspaper and 
did part-time modeling in department 
stores. Her home is in Chevy Chase, 
Md. 

According to Professor Warren L. 
Strausbaugh of the Speech Depart- 
ment, Tippy is "one of the most promis- 
ing young actresses to appear in Uni- 
versity Theatre productions." 
50-Year Keys 

During Homecoming half-time cere- 
monies, Miss Stringer, Dave Brigham 
and Talbot Speer awarded 50-Year 
keys to Dr. J. J. McCormick and Dr. 
Albert S. Harden of the Class of '01. 

Dr. McCormick, a graduate of the 
School of Dentistry, and Dr. Harden, 
of the School of Medicine, journeyed 
from Troy, N. Y. and Newark N. J., 
respectively, for the festivities. 

The usual half time band formations 
were cancelled because of the marshy 
field, but Maryland's year-old card sec- 
tion put on a total of twelve stunts 
honoring the alumni and the two oppos- 
ing teams. 

Song . . . 

Following the game and the Alumni 
Mixer, the Camel Caravan Show was 
broadcast on a CBS nationwide hook-up 
from Ritchie Coliseum. Stars Vaughn 
Monroe, the Moonmaids and the Moon- 
men gave a Salute to Maryland as chief 
feature of the broadcast. They sang 
"Hail Alma Mater" and "The Victory 
Song." 

"We take great pleasure in paying 
our respects to the student body and 
the alumni of the University of Mary- 
land," Vaughn Monroe said in a letter 
to the students. "Many of you have 
been members of our audience for years 
and we want to show our appreciation." 
. . . and Dance 

Monroe had previously appeared at 
a University function in February 
1950, when he played for the Inter- 
fraternity Ball. 

A capacity crowd of 2000 couples 
attended the annual Homecoming 

[3] 



Dance, reigned over by newly-crowned 
Queen Tippy. The Armory was adorned 
with blue streamers and silver bells, 
decorated with numerals designating 
the alumni classes. 

Adding entertainment to Vaughn 
Monroe's dance music, Ziggy Talent 
sang several comedy numbers. 

Bob Ratliff, chairman of the dance 
committee, reported the dance one of 
the most successful in i-ecent years. 
"Tickets were sold out a week before 
the event," he said. 

Homecomers 

Among the hundreds of homecoming 
grads was Dr. R. Sumter Griffith, of 
Waynesboro, Va. The oldest returning 
alumnus, Dr. Griffith has attended 
every homecoming and commencement, 
except one, for the past 21 years. Now 
92, he graduated from the Maryland 
Agriculture College in 1880 and from 
the Medical School in Baltimore in '86. 

When asked the secret of his longev- 
ity, he advised "When you're young, 
leave women alone. When you're older, 
they will leave you alone. And without 
women you will live to a ripe old age." 
Hardly following his own advise, how- 
ever, Dr. Griffith remarked in express- 
ing his approval of Queen Tippy, "She 
said she thought she was entitled to 
a kiss and I gave her one." 
Chemistry Professor 

Another old grad to return this year 
as usual was Dr. H. B. McDonald, old- 
est living former faculty member. An 
1888 graduate of the Medical School, 
Dr. McDonald was a professor in the 
Chemistry Department from 1890 to 
1938. He now resides in College Park. 

Clifton E. Fuller, '94, the first quar- 
terback on the football team, was also 
present this year to view Maryland's 
win over Missouri. Fuller traveled 
from his home in Cumberland to see 
the game. 

According to one alum, "Maryland 
looks different, but it still looks good 
to me." That seemed to sum up alumni 
feeling about homecoming. 





TAL SPEER RE-ELECTED PRESIDENT 

Prominent Maryland Publisher Again Heads Alumni 

Association 



MARYLAND BEAUTIES WHO WERE HOMECOMING QUEEN CANDIDATES 

Never Envy the Judges of a Group Like This 

Top to Bottom, Left to Right (Standing): — Lillian Gumbs, Kappa Delta; Helen Greiner. Gamma Sigma; Barbara Simmons. Pi Beta Phi; Dolly 
Medlock, Kappa Alpha Theta ; Queen Tippie Stringer, Delta Delta Delta; Jenny Schubert, Ballroom Dance Club; and Ellen Hurson, Dormitory 2. 

Seated: — Nancy Harrison, Margaret Brent Hall; Ann Curtiss. Anne Arundel Hall; Nila Countryman, Dormitory 3; Frankie Curtis, Collegiate 
4-H ; Barbara Briggs, Sigma Kappa; Nancy Clagett, Gamma Phi Beta; Frances Swann, Alpha Omicron Pi; and Elsa Wirth, Alpha Chi Omega. 

Seated: — Nancy Richardson, Alpha Xi Delta; Nancy Mularkey, Dormitory HH; Joan Eccles, Kappa Kappa Gamma; Sue Scotten, Daydodgers Club: 
Eileen Reinhardt, Phi Sigma Sigma; Peggy Brennig, Alpha Delta Pi; Helen Fogel, Alpha Epsilon Phi: Ruth Hirshman, Sigma Delta Tau; and Charlotte 
Loehler, Delta Gamma. 

awarded a Certificate of Merit for his 
services. He also assisted the War 
Manpower Commission and gave the 
WAC Recruiting Program major as- 
sistance. During the Korean conflict, 
he has served on the Industrial Mob- 
ilization Committee and on the Govern- 
ment Advisory Committee at the re- 
quest of the National Association of 
Manufacturers. 

Mr. Speer is owner and publisher of 
the Maryland Gazette, the Evening 
Capital, the Coast Guard magazine, 
the Chesapeake Skipper, and the 
Southern Maryland Times. 
Second Term 

Dr. Goldstein, a 1912 graduate of the 
School of Medicine, is a past President 
of the Medical Alumni Association. He 
is now serving his second term as 
President of the Baltimore Club. He 
is past president of the Mid-Atlantic 
Urological Society and of the Baltimore 
City Medical Society. He is Medical 
Director and Surgeon for Sinai Hos- 
pital and Professor at the University's 
Medical School. He is a well known 
author on systems of surgery and a 
national recognized authority on sur- 
gical urology. 

Miss Morris, class of 1924, climaxed 
many years of intense alumni interest 
and activity with her ascension to the 
Council Vice-Presidency. Under her 
administration the New York Alumni 
Club sponsored a "Charlie Keller Day" 



TALBOT T. Speer of Baltimore was 
again named President of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Alumni Associa- 
tion. He will also serve as Chairman 
of the forty-member general Alumni 
Council comprised of representatives 
from eleven School Associations and 
five alumni clubs. 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, also of Balti- 
more, was re-elected Vice-President at 
the annual meeting of the Council on 
November 9, 1951. Dr. Goldstein was 
President of the University's Alumni 
Club in Baltimore. 

From New York 

Miss Sarah E. Morris of New York 
was named to the other Vice-Presi- 
dency. She served two terms as Presi- 
dent of the New York Alumni Club 
and represents that organization on the 
Council. 

President Speer is a 1917 graduate 
from College Park and is one of the 
State's outstanding business executives. 
An outstanding athlete and today a 
recognized golfer, he was rated Mary- 
land's football player of the year in 



1915. He has served in various alumni 
capacities and is presently on the 
Board of Directors of the Business and 
Public Administration Alumni Chapter. 
He is presently President, General 
Manager and Chairman of the Board 
of the Baltimore Salesbook Company 
as well as President and organizer of 
the Associated Industries of Maryland. 
His many activities include a Director- 
ship of the Baltimore Association of 
Commerce, the Union Trust Company, 
and the National Association of Man- 
ufacturers. 

Many Interests 

Mr. Speer has also been active as a 
member of the U. S. Army Advisory 
Board, the Rotary Club, the American 
Legion, the Society of the First Divi- 
sion of American Expeditionary Forces, 
and the Higher Education Committee 
of the State of Maryland. He had an 
outstanding record in World War I 
and was awarded the Purple Heart, the 
Silver Star, and the Croix de Guerre. 

During World War II the new Presi- 
dent served on the War Production 
Board's Advisory Committees and was 



[4] 




HEAD TABLE AT HOMECOMING LUNCHEON 

Left to right: — Senator Millard Tydings '10, at microphone: Talbot T. Speer '17, President Alumni Association; President H C Byrd: Clifton 
Fuller '96, Maryland's first quarterback; Dr. H. B. McDonald '88, former head of Chemistry Department; Dr. R. Sumter Griffith '80, Oldest Alumnus 
present; Judge William P. Cole Jr. '10, Chairman of Board of Regents. 



in Yankee Stadium in the fall of 1948. 
Since 1926 she has served as Secretary 
and Executive Secretary for the firm 
of Matthew H. O'Brien and now has 
offices in the Empire State Building-. 

The nominating committee was under 
the chairmanship of former Council 
President C. V. Koons '29 Engineering, 
and included Frank Black, Pharmacy; 
Judson Bell, Education; G. Kenneth 
Reiblich, Law; and Egbert Tingley, 
Business & Public Administration. 
Committee Reports 

Other business at the November ses- 
sion included a report from the Legis- 
lative Committee by Chairman J. Gil- 
bert Prendergast; a Scholarship Com- 
mittee presentation by Chairman 
Joseph C. Longridge and the Presi- 
dent's Annual Report by Mr. Speer. 

A discussion of Homecoming Activ- 
ities brought the suggestion that 
Alumni Committees be designated to 
work actively on Homecoming Day; 
a faculty Committee be on hand to 



gieet and visit Alumni; an earlier date 
be designated to avoid weather com- 
plications; a central location be es- 
tablished for registration and reunion; 
morning' business meetings be replaced 
with a general assembly for faculty 
and Alumni; seating by classes at 
luncheon and mixer; and an open house 
on the part of all departments of the 
University. 

Special Committees 

Special committees are being named 
by the President to study further 
the scholarship program and to greatly 
expand the organizing of geographical 
alumni clubs. Emphasis in the year 
ahead will be on the formation of Clubs 
throughout the country. Alumni vol- 
unteers are urgently needed to spear- 
head this program in the many local- 
ities where University Alumni are con- 
centrated. Any Alumni wishing to 
assist in th's project are asked to con- 
tact the Alumni Office immediately. 



^r 






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FIFTY YEARS AFTER '01 

Left to right: — Dr. A. S. Harden, Newark, 
N. J.; Dr. James J. McCormick. Troy, N. Y. 




ALL DELTA SIGMA PHI 



Al Danegger Foto 



Left to right around the festive Homecoming board we have:- Mrs. and Mr. William Steel, Mrs. and Mr. Warren Wagner, Mr. and Mrs. Walter 
Tayler, Mn. and Mr. Carl Bell. Men are all members of Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity at Maryland and all their wives are University Alumni. 

[5] 



lutnni 



PRESIDENT'S 
MESSAGE 




Pres. Speer 



By Talbot T. Speer 

President Alumni Association 



WITH THE close of another year 
of Alumni activity and prog- 
ress, I want to extend to you an 
expression of my appreciation for your 
cooperation and support during the 
past year, while at the same time 
pledging myself to do everything in 
my power to further the University of 
Maryland and our Alumni Association 
in the year ahead. 

Before reviewing 
the past year, I 
would like to an- 
nounce a vigorous 
and aggressive pro- 
gram for 1952. Ma- 
jor emphasis will 
center on the for- 
mation of Alumni 
Clubs throughout 
the State and Na- 
tion. This can only 
be done with your 
help, and we hope you will take the 
initiative and request the Alumni Office 
to send you lists of Alumni in your 
area plus information concerning the 
organization of such clubs. All of us 
connected with Alumni affairs are 
ready to offer a hand in this direction. 
We do not want to lose sight of the 
importance of our Alumni publication, 
"Maryland," which is a major factor 
in holding us together and keeping us 
abreast of developments. I know we 
can count on all of you to do your part 
in encouraging other Alumni to sub- 
scribe. 

A brief glance into the past shows 
that Alumni activity for the year 1951 
continues, for the most part, in the 
well established direction charted by 
previous councils and administrations. 
Emphasis was again placed on the 
Alumni publication, "Maryland," with 
subscriptions showing some increase 
over previous years. Special functions 
were held by most of our eleven in- 
dividual school associations. Alumni 
Clubs were active in Baltimore, New 
York, Cumberland and, for the first 
time, in Pittsburgh. 

Initial steps were taken in the de- 
velopment of a scholarship program 
and additional emphasis was given 
legislation of interest to the University 
of Maryland and our alumni. I want 
to especially commend our legislative 
committee under the chairmanship of 
Mr. Prendergast for an excellent job. 

An extensive program was under- 
taken for Homecoming and I feel suc- 
cessfully concluded. Special emphasis 
was placed on Class Reunions and un- 



doubtedly this policy should be con- 
tinued. 

In the past year over 300,000 pieces 
of mail have gone from the alumni 
office, 2500 new names have been added 
to the alumni lists bringing the total 
to more than 25,000, and cross-refer- 
ence files and plates are on file. 

Personal thoughts for possible con- 
sideration by the next Council include 
the establishment of a full-fledged 
scholarship program, participation in 
legislative matters to the extent desired 
by the University Administration and 
the Alumni, the formation of additional 
geographical clubs, more circulation 
for "Maryland," and closer liaison with 
the Deans of the Colleges and their 
School Associations. 

I want to repeat, it has been a real 
privilege to serve with you during the 
past year and I pledge my help to 
assure the greatest year in our Alumni 
Association history in 1952. 




GUEST SPEAKER 

Brigadier General William M. Creasy, who 
delivered the first of a series of three lectures at 
Maryland on the subject, "Biological Warfare" 



SPEAKS ON WARFARE 

General Creasy, Commanding Gen- 
eral, Chemical Corps Research and 
Development Command, which is re- 
sponsible for all Chemical Corps 
research, development and engineering 
programs, addressed a group of stu- 
dents and faculty members on the sub- 
ject, "Biological Warfare." 

This was the first of a series of three 
lectures on Science in Future Warfare, 
under the auspices of the Division of 
Physical Sciences, University of Mary- 
land. The lecture discussed potentiali- 
ties of biological warfare, germ clouds, 
contaminated food and water, sabotage 
by toxins, the attack on live stock, and 
the detection and defense against bio- 
logical warfare. 

The succeeding lectures on this series 
will be: Gas, Smoke and Flame, March, 
1952 and Medical Research, April, 1952. 



BALTIMORE CLUB ON TV 

By Beatrice Young Jarrett 

M UNIQUE undertaking by the 
X~m Baltimore Club of the University 
of Maryland Alumni is a series of Tele- 
vision shows in which activities of the 
Club as well as reviews of the various 
Colleges of the University are featured. 
WBAL-TV, through the cooperation of 
Mr. DeLancy Provost, Vice President 
and Director of Hearst Radio, and Mr. 
Arnold Wilkes, Director of Public Af- 
fairs WBAL-TV, is conducting this se- 
ries of Public Service programs, 12:30- 
12:45 P. M. 

The first TV show in October fea- 
tured an informal interview with Dr. 
Albert E. Goldstein, President of the 
Baltimore Club; Dr. Charles Sylvester, 
1st Vice President; Dr. John Krantz, 
2nd Vice President; and James O. Proc- 
tor, Secretary-Treasurer. They were in- 
terviewed by Anne Holland, of WBAL- 
TV's Public Service Department, on the 
Club's activities of the past three years. 

The November 9th program, in which 
Talbot T. Speer, President of the Alum- 
ni Council of the University of Mary- 
land; and David Brigham, Executive 
Secretary of the Alumni Association, 
sketched the progress of the University 
from the early days of the Agricul- 
tural, Medical and Dental Schools to 
its present magnitude, ranking among 
leading educational centers of the 
United States. 

Members of the Nursing Staff of the 
University Hospital were presented 
in an interesting program of Play 
Therapy, on December 5th, in which pa- 
tients of the hospital gave an ac- 
tual demonstration of the magnificent 
work that is being done in that depart- 
ment under the able leadership of Miss 
Florence Gipe, Dean of the Nursing- 
School. 

Plans are under way for a gala pro- 
gram on the history of football at the 
University, for the January 9th show, 
during which time former and present 
players will depict outstanding plays 
during their stardom. 

Annual Dinner-Dance 

The Baltimore Club of University of 
Maryland Alumni will entertain the 
members of the 1951 football team 
and its coach, Jim Tatum, at the annual 
dinner-dance to be held at the Sheraton- 
Belvedere Hotel, Wednesday evening, 
January 16th. This occasion is the one 
big social event that the Club sponsors 
during the winter season. Invitations 
will go out to members and friends of 
the Club. Dr. Arthur I. Bell and his 
committee are in charge of program 
arrangements. 

This meeting was originally sched- 
uled for January 23rd, please change 
your calendar, and hold the date of the 
16th open. 

************* 

O. W. HOLMES:— 
"The great thi>i<; in this world is not 
so much where we are, but in what 
direction we ore moving." 



[6] 



I'HTIM FIIIIM TUG NEW WlilikLI (ILK 




THESE CALENDARS ARE AVAILABLE THROUGH THE ALUMNI OFFICE, COLLEGE PARK, AT $1.25. 

[7] 



iligfjt of ttje ^orlb 

Needed for '52 
'Behold I am with you alway." 



>>ING in the New Year, 1952! In 
J^- distant countries our young men 
are fighting for their lives. 

Some of them return home wonder- 
ing why they were called. Others have 
ceased wondering. They'll suffer no 
more. They'll march no more. They 
have come home in boxes. These are 
boys from a country that harbors no 
desire toward taking anything away 
from others. The list includes lads who 
graduated from Maryland as recently 
as June '51. 

At home our press features one "in- 
vestigation" after another while accu- 
sations and counter-accusations bounce 
back and forth like birds in a badmin- 
ton game. "Look at him! He's bad. I 
am holier than he!" 

That's 1952 and we ring it in just 
after observing the anniversary of Him 
who said, "I am the Light of the 
World." How pitifully in need of that 
Light is the world of 1952! 

Three Great Reporters 

The Light of the world! Christmas! 
The birthday of the Babe of Bethlehem. 
History gives you three accounts of His 
life, written by three great historians 
who, by today's newspaper standards, 
would be rated as Grade A reporters. 

Christmas Eve, the birthday of the 
Babe of Bethlehem. What does it mean 
to the world? What should it mean 
to the world? What did His life teach 
the world? 

It should mean a world at peace, a 
world of men of good will, the shared 
life, democracy, tolerance, appreciation, 
friendship and helpfulness, one toward 
another. 

Adherence to ideals which the Babe 
of Bethlehem taught and for which He 
lived and died is all the whole human 
race needs. 

His ideals apply to those who believe 
He was sent by God the Father, who 
believe that he literally calmed the 
seas, raised the dead, healed the sick, 
cast out devils and walked upon the 
surface of the deep. 

However, His ideals are just as right 
for those who believe Jesus of Naza- 
reth was but a human being like any 
other man; the son of Joseph and 
Mary, who died, was buried and stayed 
buried. 

Ideals of Major Importance 
The important fact to all mankind 
is that His idrah did not die and will 
not die, but have grown and will grow 
some more in spite of efforts to kill 
them and bury them. 

His teachings and His ideals were 
and are right. If they were not the 
millions of stained glass windows 
erected to His name would not be in 
existence the world over. As Julia 
Ward Howe so aptly wrote in the 
Battle Hymn of the Republic, "His 
Truth is marching on!" 

'.fluPIRITUAL realities alone will 
&* raise man again to the level ttf 
a civilized being from out of the depth 
of his present animality." — Very Rev- 
erend Monsignor John S. Spence, '51 
Baccalaureate address. 



Here was a great Leader of Men, a 
profound student of theology, a genius. 

At twelve years of age this prodigy 
astounded the High Priests of the 
Temple and His own parents by His 
profound knowledge and wisdom. 

As He taught, preached and urged 
the religion of a better way of life, 
tolerance, love and kindness to an ever 
growing following, a small group of 
men of power railroaded Him in the 
night, without trial or defense. When 
"the mob" had seen this Gentle Jew, 
the last of the great Hebrew prophets, 
die upon the cross on the Hill of Skulls 
they may have thought that was the 
last of Him. However, He had taught 
that no man or group of men, no 
nation, no national leader, no matter 
how powerful, is as great as the ideals 
expounded by Him. 

Which of His Lessons Now? 

And so we pass another one of His 
birthday anniversaries with a new year 
facing a troubled world. 

Which of the many fine, decent, clean 
lessons He taught would yon expound 
now for the world of 1952? 

With the globe as it is today, its 
nations at each other's throats, our men 
and boys dying in their tracks in dis- 
tant lands, we'd suggest the world's 
finest lesson in TOLERANCE as illus- 
trated by Him. 

It is a lesson that emphasizes the 
Golden Rule. It is needed today, among 



"TJF men and women would only 
<<J turn to the Source of all Real 
Strength there would be more bright- 
ness and we should have less fear. 
Only by accepting the basic principles 
of religion can we preserve the finest 
values that we have." — Dr. H. C. Byrd, 
President, University of Maryland. 



nations and among individuals, as it 
has always been needed. 

The lesson takes you to Jerusalem. 
There is the sturdy, young Nazarene 
carpenter who had fashioned a whip 
with which He drove the money chang- 
ers and pigeon peddlers from the House 
of the Lord, to further antagonize the 
enemies who increased their schemes 
and efforts toward trumping up charges 
designed to do away with Him. 

Greatest Lesson in Tolerance 

If they could prove that this Man 
tirged violation of the Laws of Moses 
that ought to accomplish their objec- 
tive. So, knowing Him for His kindness 
and tolerance, they called His attention 
to a woman of the streets; pushed her 
before Him where she stood miserably 
plucking at the hem of her tawdry 
gown. 

"Master," they said, "this woman 
has been taken in adultery, in the very 
act. Now Moses, in the law, commanded 
us that such should be stoned. What 
sayest thou?" 

That was it I If He urged violation 
of the law of Moses they had Him! If 
he urged compliance with the law the 
stoning of the woman would conflict 
with His doctrine of tolerance, love and 
kindness. Thus He would lose His 
followers. He couldn't win. 

The Book tells us that Jesus did not 
immediately answer the question. He 
stooped down and, as though He had 
not heard them. He wrote on the 
ground with His finger. 
, Then He looked up at them and said, 



•Hr thtlt is 



ithmil sin. nmona uoit. 



8 ftoitoap Ctritorial 

By Harvey L. Miller 



A few moments later He turned to 
Mary Magdalene and asked, "Where 
are thine accusers? Hath no man 
accused thee?" 

They had slunk out. Jesus and Mary 
Magdalene were alone. 

"No man. Lord," was her reply. 

Jesus said, "Neither do I condemn 
thee. Go and sin no more." 

That is the lesson for 1952. When 
it is quoted, attention is seldom called 
to the fact that in the Scriptures this 
lesson is immediately followed with 
Jesus' words, "I am the Light of the 
World!" 

Loyal Beyond All .Others 

The Magdalene story of tolerance is 
one of the lessons that made Him the 
Light of the World. 

And how did this lesson affect Mary 
Magdalene? How did she react to this 
helpful advice, this chance to shoot 
straight from then on? 

The record is that she followed Jesus 
from that day until the one on which 
she saw the spikes cruelly driven 
through His hands and through His 
feet. 

With bowed head she stood with 
others as, from the height of the cross, 
He moaned His plea. "Father, forgive 
them for they know not what they do!" 

With the others she stood the vigil 
as the earth shook in darkness and the 
curtains of the temple were rent asun- 
der. As the others, one by one, turned 
away from the scene of this tragedy 
of the ages, Mary Magdalene, who 
might have, without Him, been stoned 
to death, stood guard at the sepulchre 
where they had placed Him, loyal 
beyond death and beyond all others. 

It was there that she was asked, 
"Woman why weepest thou?" 

She replied, "Because they have 
taken away my Lord." 

Beside her stood a Man whom she 
mistook for the gardener. He asked, 
"Whom seekest thou?" Then He ad- 
dressed her, "Mary!" 

No One Has Taken Him Away 

With her reply, "Master!" came the 
realization that no our had taken Him 
away! No one ever has or ever will 
take Him away. He is here today for 
those who will but see Him.> His ideals 
are here for those who will abide by 
them. 

If the world but practiced the toler- 
ance taught by the lesson of Mary 
Magdalene it would be. a grand old 
world in which to live. "He that is 
without sin let him first cast a stone." 

As the world is going now, in spite 
of the advice "that ye love one an- 
other," the human race might try giv- 
ing the world back to the rabbits. Man 
has made a horrendous mess of it. 

Mary Magdalene, loyal from the 
market place to the grave and beyond, 
learned the lesson that all the world 
ran learn, namely that no one has taken 
Jesus away from any one for, closely 
following the beautiful story of Mary 
• Magdalene, the Book gives us, "I am 
with vou alway. I am the LIGHT OF 
THE WORLD!" 



"/JITHIS world was meant to be a 
^**^ Garden of Eden, a place of ful- 
fillment, where human beings, but little 
lower than the angels, grow towards 
beauty, goodness and truth." — Rabbi 
Morris Lieherman, '50 Baccalaureate 
address. 




Co?L ro f HOME 
ECONOMICS 

By Lucy Knox and 
Mary Speake Humelsine 



Wins Borden Prize 

■TMEGGY Richards, senior in the 
WT college of Home Economics, re- 
ceived the annual Borden award of 
$300 presented by Miss Marie Mount, 
dean of the college of Home Economics. 

The scholarship award is presented 
each year by the Borden Company to 
the senior in the college of Home Eco- 
nomics who has maintained the highest 
over-all average provided she has been 
in the college of Home Economics for 
two previous years and has credits in 
the last two food courses. 

Miss Richards, senior majoring in 
textiles and clothing, is president of 
Omicron Nu, national Home Economics 
Honorary as well as of Dormitory 3. 
Her over-all average is 3.6. 
At Columbus 

Last June Miss Richards represented 
Omicron Nu at its national conclave 
in Columbus, Ohio. While theie she 
was asked by the head of the American 
Home Economic Association to repre- 
sent student Home Economic clubs at 
a convention in Cleveland, Ohio. 

She also attended the National 
Citizenship Conference in Washington, 
D. C, last year. 

This was the seventh year the Borden 
Company has made the award to a 
senior in Home Economics. Miss Rich- 
ards' name will be added to those al- 
ready on the bronze plaque in the 
Maryland Room. 

In Houston 

Dean Marie Mount of the College of 
Home Economics attended a conference 
of the Land Grant Colleges in Houston, 
Texas. Miss Mount is chairman of 
Legislation. 



Student Pages 

By Mary L. Vaughan 

(Washington Evening Star) 

Miss Ruth McRae (H.Ec. '37, MA '43) 
is Washington's only high school prin- 
cipal who arrives at her post at 6 a.m. 
daily. 

Miss McRae is Principal of the Capi- 
tol Page School. 

From her pale green office on the 
third floor of the Library of Congress, 
Miss McRae's view encompasses the 
Capitol, the Washington Monument and 
the Virginia shores. 

"It's worth getting up early each 
morning to see the sun coming up over 
the city," Miss McRae said. She pointed 
out the entire city 
with the Washington 
Cathedral- appearing 
as a tiny castle in 
the distance. 

The view is one of 
the nicest things 
about her job, sur- 
passed only by her 
interest in her 61 
students. 

The boys, all pages 
by Congressional ap- 
pointment, attend 
classes until 10:30 a.m. when they go 
to work as pages and messengers on 
the floors of Congress. 

"They are no trouble to handle," the 
former home economics teacher insists. 
"They are quite mature for their years 
and are more interested in study than 
in causing trouble," she added. 

Miss McRae was "pleasantly sur- 
prised" last fall by her appointment as 
head of the school. A graduate of 
Maryland, she taught home economics 
at Gordon Junior High before being- 
made assistant principal at Central. 
She worked for months at Western 
High compiling 47,000 records of 
graduates and former students of old 
Central. 

Recently, the boys adopted a school 
song, "The Capitol Page Hymn," writ- 
ten by a parent and sung to the tune 




Miss McRae 



of "The Marines Hymn." It leads off: 
"From the Halls of Congress, here we 
come." 

In the same vein, Miss McRae, with 
the help of her youthful charges, had 
basketball uniforms made up for the 
school team. The design, in the school 
colors of red, white and blue, includes 
blue satin jackets with red and white 
knit insets and "Capitol Page" on the 
back. 

"That's one of the different things 
about this job," the trim and attractive 
principal explained. "Right now I'm 
busy making out a basketball schedule 
for the team. I also have to line up 
the basketball equipment, a job I've 
never done before," she added. 

Miss McRae keeps a close watch on 
the individual pages for fatigue. "That's 
my only problem; they sometimes work 
too hard and any disciplinary actions 
I might take would arise from that 
fact," she said. 

Her popularity with the messengers 
is attested to by the constant and smil- 
ing stream of faces coming to her office 
to exchange greetings. She keeps a 
table and chairs nearby, niled with 
magazines which she wants "her boys" 
to lead. 

Makes Allowances 

Even the traditional tardy scholar 
gets a break with Miss McRae. "Com- 
ing to school so early and working so 
hard can often cause a boy to be late," 
the principal maintains. "I make al- 
lowances for everything." 

As a member of the executive board 
of the YWCA, the youthful principal 
has arranged for an exchange of dances 
between the school and the Y. She 
also expects to add two couches and 
a piano to the school's huge library 
"to make it more homey," she ex- 
plained. And her next biggest project 
will be to arrange an assembly period 
every two weeks for the students, when 
guest speakers will be former students 
who have made good in the business 
world. 

Miss McRae's reputation as principal 



[9] 



spread not only throughout the school 
but down into the lower floors of the 
Library. 

"You know she sure is doing wonders 
with those boys," the elderly elevator 
operator said. "They're not half as 
much trouble as they were last year." 

Home Coming Meeting 

The fifth annual meeting of the 
Alumni Association of the College of 
Home Economics was held at the Uni- 
versity, in the Maryland Room, on No- 
vember 3, 1951. 

After a social hour, with coffee and 
doughnuts served by the College of 
Home Economics, the meeting was 
called to order by the chairman, Ruth 
McRae. 

Hazel Temey Tuemueler reported on 
the success of the money-making proj- 
ect, tray and waste basket sales. Her 
report showed a good supply of articles 
on hand, money in hand and all debts 
paid. A complete report is filed. 

Since three members of the Home 
Economics Board attend regularly the 
Council meetings in Baltimore, a re- 
quest was made that the secretary give 
some of the highlights of that meeting 
held September 7. 

In the absence of Eleanor Etunne, 
chairman of the nominating committee, 
the secretary read the slate of names 
for the new members of the Board of 
Directors of the Home Economics 
Alumni Association. 

Hilda Jones Nystrom, class '32; 
Curey Nourse England, class '30; 
Mary Speake Humelsine, class '39. 
All were unanimously elected for a 
term of three years. 

At this time the Board of Directors 
retired to elect officers and co-editors 
for the Maryland magazine : 
Mary Langford, chairman; 
Ruth McRae, vice chairman; 
Hilda Nystrom, secretary; 
Mary Humelsine and Katharine 
Longridge, co-editors of the magazine. 
While the Board elected officers, Miss 
Mount extended greetings on behalf of 




FIRST GRADUATES 

First Graduates of College of Home Economics 
at Homecoming were Biilie Bland, '21, Teacher 
at Havre de Grace High School and I.etha 
Edmonds (lendaniel, '21, Homemaker, attending 
with her daughter. 




AT HOME ECONOMICS HOMECOMING 



Al Danegger Foto 



Jane Crow, Faculty; Grace Rogers, '46, assistant curator of textiles, Smith Institution; Faye 
Mitchell, Faculty; Vienna Curtiss (seated). Faculty; Barbara Kephart, '45; Jane Kcphart Keller, 
'39; Pela Braucher, Faculty. 



the Home Economics Faculty and in- 
troduced members of the association 
and friends. The association was 
brought up to date on the activities of 
the members during the past years. 

Among the graduates present were 
three graduates of the class of 1926, 
whose class was celebrating its 25th 
anniversary: Olive Wallace MacBride 
Margaret Wolfe Aldridge and Mary 
Riley Langford. 

To Minneapolis 

Mabel S. Spencer of the Home Eco- 
nomics Department attended a meeting 
of the American Vocational Associa- 
tion at Minneapolis, Minn., November 
26 through December 1. 

In New York 

Miss Vienna Curtiss, head of the 
Department of Practical Art, partic- 
ipated in the Art in Industry discussion 
panel at the Mid-Century Art Careers 
Conference in New York. Outstanding 
architects, industrial designers, illus- 
trators, mural painters, sculptors, and 
college art educators contributed to the 
program. The conference is sponsored 
by the Women's University Club of 
New York for the purpose of evaluating 
career opportunities for women and 
providing exchange of ideas between 
persons engaged in art education at the 
college level and persons who pursue 
art commercially. 

Miss Curtiss was recently elected to 
the Advisory Board of the Art Division 
of the Maryland State Teachers' Asso- 
ciation. Miss Curtiss is to represent the 
teaching of art at the college level. 



VISIT WOUNDED VETERANS 

Korean war veterans in the Bethesda 
Naval Hospital are being treated to 
something new and pretty these eve- 
nings — co-ed hostesses from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland. 

The College Park lassies, a total of 
103 of them, visit the hospital on Mon- 
day, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday 
evenings from 7 to 8:30. Each co-ed 
hostess devotes two evenings a month 
to visiting the wards. 

The girls participate in games, play 
cards and join in square dancing. They 



spend most of their time entertaining 
men in the neuropsychiatric ward. 

The plan is being sponsored by the 
university's Red Cross Chapter, with 
Miss Elizabeth Nelson, assistant dean 
of women, as adviser for the hostesses. 



IN YUGOSLAVIA 



Brig. Gen. John Harmony who, as a 
1st Lieutenant and Captain, coached 
boxing at Maryland, concluding in 1936, 
heads the new advisory group set up 
under the United States-Yugoslav 
military aid agreement in Belgrade. 

Premier Marshall Tito and United 
States Ambassador George A. Allen 
signed the military aid agreement by 
which Yugoslavia will get more Amer- 
ican arms to bolster her defenses. 

The agreement provides for the es- 
tablishment of a United States military 
assistance group in Yugoslavia to in- 
sure that the pact's terms are met. 

Gen. Harmony, 51, was formerly 
United States military attache to Italy. 



SEZ TESTUDINETTE: - 

/% BACHELOR is 
-^^ a fellow who 
can lie down on the 
new white sofa in 
the living room and 
take a nap. . . . The 
feminine equivalent 
of "bachelor" is 
"Lady - in - Wait- 
ing." . . . A tniiit 
julep is a block- 
buster with a south- 
ern drawl. ... A 
hug is energy gone 
to waist. . . . We 
know a fellow who 
s/ii at go much on a girl that he finally 
married her for his money. . . .An old 
maid knows all the answers but never 
gets any questions. . . . One thing about 
bathing suits is you no longer have to 
take a girl at face value. 




[10] 



School of 

NURSING 

By Amy Lee Wells '40 



New Uniforms 
I! The philosopher who coined, 
"Time and tide wait for no man," 
wasn't kidding. Time won't even slow 
down. We learned all about that by 
missing- last issue's dead line for 
Maryland. 

There are, so I learn from indis- 
putable figures, seventy-one "probies" 
but one sure wouldn't recognize them 
very readily by their uniform. The 
new look is a white coat — very much 
like a lab coat, worn over the regular 
clothes. This is certainly more com- 
fortable and less trouble to don, especi- 
ally when late for class. However, 
think of the fun they missed of getting 
into the brand new uniform on the first 
day of school. 

It has been good news to hear of 
all the new homes acquired: Mr. and 
Mrs. Carl V. Liendeon and son are 
settled in Oak Park, Illinois. (Nee 
Elizabeth Worthy '32). 

The John P. Sheperdsons in Hartford, 
Connecticut (Nee Virginia June Beane 
'44). 

The David F. Altimier's in Niagara 
Falls, New York (Nee Nancy Lee Jones 
'42). 

The Dennis Smith's in Westminster, 
Maryland (Nee Edna Mitchell '19). 

Dr. and Mrs. Wayne Riordan in Long 
Beach, California. 

For the past several months every- 
one has been scurrying around hunting 
apartments, buying furniture, and all 
the other gadgets necessary for house- 
keeping. All the graduate nurses have 
had to move out of the nurses home and 
nurses quarters in the hospital. They 
all seemed to be having a good time 
in spite of the toil involved. 

The hospital cafeteria is no longer 
serving food "gratis" — you pay or you 
don't eat. Needless to say "Al's" is 
doing a booming business. 

Nursing Notes 

As you walk toward the first floor ro- 
tunda and behold the imposing booth 
confronting you — you listen sharply ex- 
pecting to hear the strident voice of a 
train barker — but there comes only the 
clang of an elevator door and the 
familiar salutation of the operator 
"First floor, coming out and going 
down." This is the new Information 
desk. All the clerks are volunteer work- 
ers — looking very neat and efficient in 
an aquamarine color uniform with a 
gold embroidered emblem on the blouse 
pocket signifying them as such. All 
the volunteer workers are now wearing 
similar uniforms of the same color. 

Everywhere one sees the bustle of 
the inevitable fall moving — even the 
gift shop has been rearranged — very 
picturesque but practical, as it provides 
more customer space. Mrs. Brooks and 
her assistant are dressed in lovely yel- 



low uniforms. This morning as I 
stepped off the elevator on the eighth 
floor — and as usual was making a mad 
dash for the office — I became entangled 
in a maze of chairs and tables and 
desks — Student Health Office was get- 
ting a new floor in the waiting room — 
Painters are wielding their brushes 
every day — the first floor of the hospi- 
tal has been repainted in rose-beige — 
sounds awful — but it really is an im- 
provement over that anemic green we 
have seen for so long — even the old dis- 
pensary has gotten treated with the 
same color on the main floor. 

Note from Nancy Cochran. She and 
Dr. Edwin Hubbard sailed on the S.S. 
Matrimony on 2 Oct. '51 — destination? 
That she didn't say — Post mark was 
"Topsail Beach, Holly Ridge, N. C." 

Virginia Conley has been quite ill — 
but is now convalescing rapidly. 

Carolyn Sheaffer, Mrs. Baer, window 
shopping with her son and daughter — 
She is still as sparkling as ever — Car- 
olyn lives in Westminster and this was 
the tots' day to do the toy shops. 



BARNES' RAIDERS 

Lt. Ralph Barnes, former Maryland 
student (1950), has taken command of 
the 15th Infantry Regimental Battle 
Patrol Platoon in Korea, named "Barnes' 
Raiders." 

He has been awarded the Distin- 
guished Service Cross, America's sec- 
ond highest decoration, for extraordi- 
nary heroism in action. 

The unit's primary purpose is to dis- 
rupt the enemy and frequently it in- 
filtrates enemy lines to observe enemy 
movements, cripple communications and 
capture prisoners for interrogation. 

Every member of the platoon is in 
top physical condition and an expert 
in judo and hand to hand combat. Each 
man also is an expert marksman with 
each type of infantry weapon. 

Barnes first entered the Army in 
1946, was trained at Ft. Dix, N. J., and 
then was assigned to the 25th Criminal 
Investigation Division in the Philip- 
pines. He returned to the United States 
in 1948 and was discharged. He 
was commissioned a second lieutenant 
through Maryland's Reserve Officers 
Training Corps. 

He returned to active duty in Sep- 
tember 1950 and was assigned as a 
platoon leader in Company C of the 
15th Infantry Regiment in Korea. 



DR. KARLIS LEYASMEYER 

Dr. Karlis Leyasmeyer, Latvian edi- 
tor, author, and educator, lectured on 
"World Communisim and Its Imminent 
Threat to America," sponsored by the 
Student Religious Council. During the 
past year Dr. Leyasmeyer has spoken 
on 110 college campuses in this coun- 
try, to civic groups, and before mem- 
bers of Congress. Having had personal 
experience with both Nazi and Red per- 
secution (he actually faced a Commu- 
nist firing squad), and having studied 
about Communism as well as under 
Communist professors, he is well quali- 
fied to discuss this most crucial issue. 



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[11] 




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i^oiieae of 

AGRICULTURE 

By \\ arren E. Tydings '35 



Dr. Paul E. Nystrom 

DR. PAUL E. NYSTROM is now 
the head of the Department of 
Agriculture Economics and Marketing. 
Dr. Nystrom is in charge of the re- 
search, teaching and extension pro- 
grams in the fields 
of agriculture eco- 
nomics and market- 
ing and guides the 
work of the state 
department of mar- 
kets. He continues 
as director of in- 
stiuctions in the Col- 
Btt lege of Agriculture. 
|^"^B Dr. Nystrom suc- 

M I ceeds Dr. S. H. De- 
m*i I Vault who retired on 
mB I July 31, and, in as- 
suming his new 
duties, leaves the 
post as assistant to the president, which 
he held for the past year. He has 
served successively in various capaci- 
ties for extension and in other farm 
management organizations. 

A native of California, Dr. Nystrom 
has seven years experience as a farm 
operator before coming to Maryland 
hi 1929. He has done graduate work 
at California, Maryland, Cornell, Amer- 
ican University, the Graduate School 
of the U. S. Department of Agricul- 
ture, and Harvard. 

Dr. Nystrom received his doctor's de- 
gree from Harvard, where he studied 
under a Carnegie grant. He obtained 
his B. S. degree from California and 
master's degrees from both Maryland 
and Harvard. He holds membership in 
numerous professional societies includ- 
ing the American Economic Associa- 
tion, the American Farm Economic As- 
sociation, and the American Society for 
Public Administration. 



Dr. Nystrom 



Annual Meeting 

The election of Board members and 
officers featured the Homecoming meet- 
ing of Agricultural alumni. Abram 
Z. Gottwals '38 is the new President. 
Lee Adkins '43 was named Vice-Pres- 
ident and Beatrice Y. Jarrett '34 Sec- 
retary. New members elected to the 
Board were Roger W. Cohill '47, Bea- 
trice Y. Jarrett '34, Paul Mullinix '36, 
and Otis S. Twilley '21. Representa- 
tives to the General Alumni Council 
are J. Homer Remsberg, Dr. Howard 
Steir and Mr. Gottwals. 

Following a greeting from President 
L. C. Burns, reports were heard from 
the Archives, Memorial, Conservation, 
and Research and Teacher Recognition 
Committees. Dr. T. B. Symons reported 
for his Memorial Committee and an- 
nounced the partial completion of the 
new chanel which is to be a fitting 
memorial to the men and women of the 
University who lost their lives in the 



two World Wars. He also reported on 
the prospect of a memorial garden and 
suggested a resolution be sent to the 
President of the University and the 
Board of Regents concerning the Mem- 
orial Chapel. 

Dr. Steir, Chairman of the Research 
and Teacher Recognition Committee, 
recommended the extension of recogni- 
tion to outstanding undergraduate and 
graduate students as well as teachers. 
In accordance with Committee wishes, 
teacher recognition is being placed on 
a three year basis with the next award 
scheduled for 1953. 

To Camp Gordon 

Pvt. Allan Shulder has completed 
processing at the 2053d Reception Cen- 
ter and has been assigned for Army 
basic training to the Signal Replace- 
ment Training Center, Camp Gordon, 
Ga. He received a Bachelor of Science 
degree in horticulture, class of '51. 

Assignment Changes 

Arthur E. Durfee, agricultural editor, 
has been assigned as assistant county 
agent leader in the Extension Service. 
J. C. Evans has been assigned to re- 
place Mr. Durfee as bulletin editor. 
Mr. Durfee joined 
the agricultural in- 
formation and pub- 
lications staff in 
1946 and has served 
as agricultural edi- 
tor since January, 
1949. Cornell '40, he 
served as county 
agricultural agent 
for several years in 
New York. He will 
assist John M. Ma- 
gruder, county agent 
leader, in supervis- 
ing county agricul- 
tural Extension 
work. 

Mr. Evans joined 
the Maryland staff as bulletin editor in 
February, 1950, after his graduation 
from Purdue. In his new assignment, 
Mr. Evans will direct agricultural in- 
formation and publications work. 

Esso 4-H Scholarships 

Four 4-H Club boys, now students 
at the University of Maryland College 
of Agriculture, have been awarded $100 
scholarships to continue work at the 
University. The scholarships were 
awarded primarily on the basis of merit 
and ability by the Standard Oil Com- 
pany. 

The four students are: Francis 
McGrady, Rising Sun, a freshman tak- 
ing pre-veterinarian training; Thomas 
Weller, Ellicott City, a sophomore and 
dairy major; Paul Coblentz, Middle- 
town, a junior majoring in agriculture 
education; James Dorn, Forest Hill, a 
senior in agriculture education. 

The scholarships were awarded in a 
special ceremony by two Esso Standard 
Oil Company officials, J. M. Price, Jr., 
and Richard Jenkins. Mylo S. Downey, 
state boys club leader, and Dr. Paul 
Nystrom, head of the department of ag- 
ricultural economics and marketing and 
director of resident instruction, were 
present at the meeting. 




Mr. Durfee 



[12] 




Miss Jarrett 



Bea Jarrett, Elected 
Miss Beatrice Young Jarrett, '34, ac- 
tive member of the Baltimore Club of 
the University of Maryland Alumni, 
was elected to the Board of Directors 
of the Agricultural Alumni of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, at the annual 
Homecoming Meeting, November 3rd. 
Miss Jarrett has the 
unusual distinction 
of being the first 
woman to hold that 
position in the Col- 
lege. Miss Jarrett, 
who is the chair- 
man of Publicity for 
the Baltimore Club, 
and has done an out- 
standing job since 
the Club's organiza- 
tion three years ago, 
had an additional 
honor bestowed upon 
her by being named Secretary of the 
Agricultural Alumni Association and 
agriculture editor for Maryland mag- 
azine. 

Since graduation, Miss Jarrett has 
been associated with Radio, TV, Public 
Relations and Publicity in Washington 
and Baltimore. 

Miss Jarrett holds the office of Sec- 
retary of the Women's Advertising 
Club of Baltimore and is prominent in 
civic and social circles of the city. 

Sohn in Air Corps 

Captain Henry A. Sohn, Agriculture 
'48, went on active duty in the Air 
Corps in December. He reentered as a 
bombadier-navigator, the capacity in 
which he served in World War II. 

Holly Head 

Harry Dengler, Extension Forester 
and Associate Professor in Forestry, 
has been elected Secretary-Treasurer 
of the Holly Society of America. The 
Society, which now has approximately 
400 members, was formed at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland in 1946. 



DEAN RAY ELECTED 

Dean Joseph M. Ray of the College 
of Special and Continuation Studies, 
who is also professor of Government 
and Politics, has been elected vice pres- 
ident of the Southern Political Science 
Association. He and Dr. Franklin L. 
Burdette, head of Government and Pol- 
itics, attended the convention of the 
Southern Association in Chattanooga 
on November 8 to 10. Dr. Burdette read 
a paper on Russian Aggression. 

SWIMMING POOL 

The swimming pool in the Women's 
Field House is open to faculty women, 
staff women and faculty wives every 
Monday from 7:30 to 9 p.m. A $2.00 
fee must be paid at the Cashier's Office 
and the receipt presented to the Matron 
in the Locker Room. Swim suits will 
be furnished, but each person must 
furnish her own towel, cap and swim 
clogs. 



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[13] 



L^oileae of 

EDUCATION 

By Pat Scanlan, '50 



»R. Wilbur Devilbiss, State super- 
visor of teacher and higher edu- 
cation, has been appointed Dean of the 
College of Education by the Board of 
Regents. 

He replaces Dr. Harold Benjamin, 
who resigned several months ago after 
heading the College of Education for 
more than 11 years. 

The appointment of Dr. Devilbiss was 
made at the recommendation of Dr. 
H. C. Byrd, who explained that the new 
dean was selected because the Univer- 
sity intends to emphasize the education 
and training of teachers in its program 
for the immediate future. 

"This demands a man with the close 
contacts throughout the State, enjoyed 
by Dr. Devilbiss," Dr. Byrd added. 

The new dean has held several top 
administrative school jobs including 
supervisor of the education of high 
school teachers in Maryland, super- 
visor of the State teachers colleges at 
Towson, Salisbury, and Frostburg, and 
supervisor of the junior colleges at 
Hagerstown and in Montgomery county. 

A native of Frederick county, Dr. 
Devilbiss holds a doctorate in education 
from George Washington University. 
He took his Master of Arts at the Uni- 
versity of Maryland and received his 
bachelor's degree from Western Mary- 
land college. 

His work in the field of education be- 
gan as a teacher at Mardella high school 
in Wicomico county. Later he taught 
at Middletown high school and Fred- 
erick high school. 

Margaret Walker 

One of the last year's newly tapped 




HEADS EDUCATION 

Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, newly appointed Dean, 
College of Education. His appointment fills the 
vacancy left by the retirement of Dean Harold 
Benjamin. 



Mortar Board members is Margaret 
Walker, or "Maggie" as she is known 
to her friends. 

Maggie, a senior in Education, hails 
from Illinois. She moved to College 
Park in 1934. Last year, this brunette 
coed was runner up for Miss Maryland, 
1951. 

Her honors include president of Phi 
Alpha Theta, history honorary, and 
Who's Who Among Students in Ameri- 
can Colleges and Universities. Miss 
Walker is also treasurer of Pi Beta Phi 
sorority. 

She was secretary of the Junior class, 
also holding offices in the Freshman 
and Sophomore classes. She earned a 
gold key in the Women's Chorus for 
two years of service. Maggie, in addi- 
tion, served on Dean Stamp's Fresh- 
man Week committee besides other 
SGA committees. 

Idzik in Marines 

Johnny Idzik, Education '51, a half- 
back on the University of Maryland 
football team from 1947 through 1950, 
was inducted into the United States 
Marines. He will receive his training 
at Parris Island, S. C. Idzik played in 
the North-South football game last 
year. 

Study Consultant 

Dr. Clarence A. Newell, of the Col- 
lege of Education, was consultant on 
the study which recommended that 
Montgomery County school board mem- 
bers be elected, as was approved by 
Montgomery County voters in the ref- 
erendum on November 6. Dr. Newell 
was recently elected to the State Board 
of Managers of the Maryland State 
Congress of Parents and Teachers. 

Dr. Donald Maley 
Dr. Donald Maley of the Industrial 
Education Department spoke before 
the joint faculties of the Mergenthaler 
Vocational High School, the Barton 
Vocational High School, and the Edison 
Vocational High School in Baltimore. 
He also addressed the Industrial Arts 
teachers of Carroll County. 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake 

Dr. R. Lee Hornbake of the Indus- 
trial Education Department spoke be- 
fore the Catonsville High School 
P.T.A. 

Ernest H. Hanhart 

Mr. Ernest H. Hanhart who teaches 
Mechanical Engineering at the Army 
Chemical Center in the Chemical Corps 
— University of Maryland Graduate 
Program there, has been elected na- 
tional vice-president of the American 
Society of Mechanical Engineers. 

From Alaska 

Mrs. Helen Houck Prince didn't mind 
the cold weather at Homecoming this 
year. A former member of the faculty 
of the College of Education, she had 
recently returned from Fairbanks, 
Alaska. During her seven years in the 
northern regions, with her husband, 
Mrs. Prince taught school. Her home 
is now in St. Albans, Vermont — a little 
warmer, and also a little more restful, 
as she will not be teaching. 



On Air Force Board 

Another Marylander returning from 
the Northwest was Lt. Col. Ralph W. 
Keller, of the Air Force. Col. Keller, 
a physical education major, graduated 
in 1938. Last June he received his 
Ph.D. in educational psychology from 
Stanford University, after obtaining 
his master's there in education. 

Col. Keller is now educational ad- 
viser to the Director of the Air Force 
Academy Planning Board. Legislation 
for the proposed academy is expected 
to be before Congress this spring. 

Proposed Revisions 

At the Homecoming meeting, the con- 
stitution committee announced its pro- 
posed revisions. These included amend- 
ing the constitution to allow voting by 
mail, to ensure greater representation 
and to permit a more social type of 
Homecoming meeting. Voting would 
be held before Homecoming. 

The committee also suggested that 
the annual meeting date be decided by 
the Board, with announcement of the 
date made to the alumni at least 30 
days prior to the proposed meeting. 

The suggestions of the committee 
will be sent to all alumni, and voting 
on the proposals will take place at 
the next College of Education Alumni 
Association meeting. The newly-elected 
Board members scheduled a meeting 
to acquaint the new members with the 
old and to make plans for the year. 

With Paul Whiteman 

Among seven talented 4-H Club 
members who were guests on Paul 
Whiteman's TV Teen Club on ABC, 
when his program centered around a 
State Fair theme, complete with corn- 




MARYLAND MARIMBA PLAYER 

Betty Jean Endslow of the University of 
Maryland gives Paul Whiteman some pointers 
on marimba on the TV Teen Club show in 
Philadelphia. Miss Endslow was one of a group 
of talented youngsters representing 4-H Clubs 
who were featured on the Whiteman show which 
saluted the country's largest rural youth or- 
ganization and the 30th National 4-H Congress 
which was held in Chicago, November 25-29. 



[14] 



stalks and pumpkins, was Betty Jean 
Endslow, (Education) University of 
Maryland. She plays the Marimba. 
Originating- in Philadelphia over Sta- 
tion WFIL, the live show was carried 
over 15 stations and sound filmed for 
later release on over 30 additional 
outlets. 

The opening- salute was a tribute to 
4-H Clubs. Another Maryland per- 
former featured on the program was 
Mabel Potter, tapdancer from Cam- 
bridge, Md. 

Miss Bryan Elected 

Miss Marie D. Bryan, College of 
Education, was elected Director-at- 
Large of the National Council of 
Teachers of English for the year 1951- 
52. Miss Bryan attended the national 
conference held in Cincinnati. 



ALUMNI NEW YORK 

Do you live near New York City — if 
so read this! 

Following the election of officers in 
June, 1951, the N. Y. Alumni Chapter 
started its reorganization. 

Postcard inquiries fi-om the records 
at College Park were sent to all alumni 
in this area. From the replies received 
and from personal contact the active 
members of this chapter now total 
365. Perhaps you have not been con- 
tacted — if so it is because your present 
address is not known. So if you are 
interested in joining the organization 
and sharing in our activities, please 
contact Carolyn Smith, 201 East 40th 
Street, NYC, or Bob Grogan, 147 Moore 
Ave., Freeport, N. Y. 

Our only requirements are that you 
are located in this area and attended 
the University for a period of one 
academic year. The only expense is 
that of membership dues which is 
$2.00 per year, which helps defray the 
cost of mailing, hiring halls, and inci- 
dental expenses which may ai'ise. 

The officers elected to serve until the 
spring election in 1952 are: 

President — William A. Fisher '27, 
Clen Rock, New Jersey; Executive Vice 
President — Robert M. Grogan '49, Free- 
port, New York; Vice President — C. 
Swan Weber '28, Essex Fells, New 
Jersey; Vice President — Edward J. 
Wunder '47, Elmhurst, New York; 
Secretary-Treasurer — Carolyn Smith 
'49, New York, New York; Council 
Representative — Sarah E. Morris '25, 
New York, New York; Council Repre- 
sentative — Mr. Jean H. Brayton '26, 
Huntington, New York. 

The next social function will be at 
the Hotel Commodore. It will be a 
cocktail party to be held around De- 
cember the 20th. Notice of the exact 
time and place will be sent all in the 
very near future. 

Dance plans are now underway for 
February and as soon as all the ar- 
rangements are made, everyone will 
be notified. 

Grads of all classes, led by Dr. James 
McCormick and Dr. Hanson of the 
class of 1901, to Martha Davis, class 
of 1950, met at the Advertising Club 
in New York City, to start this organ- 
ization's current social season, with a 
gala banquet. Three members, Dr. Mc- 




Dr. Steinmeyer 



Cormick, Dr. Godson, and Dr. Hanson 
journied all the way from Troy, New 
York, for the occasion. 

Commencing with a cocktail party 
many old and new acquaintances were 
made. Following the cocktail hour, all 
adjourned to a spacious private dining 
loom to enjoy a wonderful dinner. Mrs. 
Charles Loreto (formerly Dean Leslie) 
manned the ship as mistress of cere- 
monies and guided the proceedings in 
superb style. During the evening each 
person present was asked to rise and 
introduce himself. It was amazing how 
many either worked or lived in the 
vicinity of others and thus new friends 
were acquired. 

^^^ Talbot Speer, 

r'PW I the national pres- 

| I ident of the Uni- 
I versity Alumni, 
m „S had to leave early 
^ -4 *" in order to catch a 
train to keep an 
early morning ap- 
pointment. Before 
he left, however, 
Mr. Speer gave us 
a word or two on 
the general alumni 
association which 
was of great in- 
terest. 

Bill Fisher, our 
fine president, 
gave a very brief 
talk of welcoming 
to all members and 
guests present. 
Bob Grogan, Executive Vice Presi- 
dent, on behalf of the organization, was 
then presented with a check from Dave 
Brigham, the National Alumni Secre- 
tary, for $81.00, the amount thus far 
being received from our subscription 
campaign. Bob then gave us a short 
talk telling us of the number of active 
members and the purpose of the organ- 
ization. 

A brief but very informative report 
was rendered us by Sarah E. Morris, 
our representative on the General 
Alumni Council, of the council's last 
meeting and the future plans of the 
national alumni. 

Our social chairman, Ed Wunder, 
then announced the tenative social 
calendar for the year which was re- 
ceived with great approval. At this 
time the drawings for the door prizes 
were made. During the lapse of time 
for the drawings Mrs. Loreto enter- 
tained with a few memoirs of her days 
as Assistant Dean of Women and 
brought up a few instances that various 
persons thought were deep secrets of 
their undergraduate days. Time has 
made them humorous but when they 
occurred they seemed very serious. 

John Warhol, Jr., Deputy Attorney 
General of New Jersey, copped the 
grand prize of a beautiful General 
Electric radio. The dozen U of M 
glasses were won by Mr. William R. 
Maslin, now of Port Chester, New York, 
and Dr. Hanson and Dr. McCormick, 
*•••••••••••* 
RIGHT? 
Handshakers icho give yon the glad 
havd seldom give you anything else. 



our oldest grads present, each won an 
album of U of M music. All the prizes 
were very worthy and we wish each 
of the winners good fortune with them. 

Our national alumni secretary, Dave 
Brigham, gave those present a vivid 
picture of the University today, alumni 
plans, and homecoming announcements 
which was of interest to all. 

Dr. Reuben G. Steinmeyer, our guest 
speaker and nationally prominent fig- 
ure on the current world situation, held 
the audience with profound interest, 
while he spoke of his recent trip to 
Europe. He gave us his personal ex- 
periences, reactions, and a look into 
what the reactions of the European 
peoples are today. It was most inform- 
ative and given in his usual interesting 
fashion. It is a great tribute to the 
University to have such a fine and out- 
standing person as Dr. Steinmeyer as 
a faculty member. 

The dinner was a huge success but 
it did not just happen that way. It 
was only through the hard work, long 
hours, and excellent planning of Bill 
Cormany, the dinner chairman, and his 
committee. 

SCIENCE; NOT MAGIC 

"The House of Magic" presented in 
the Central auditorium was a science 
show of mystifying demonstrations — 
actually not magic at all, but proof 
that scientific facts can be stranger 
than fiction. 

Mr. John Ryan, master of ceremonies, 
started off the show by bouncing putty 
and making a five foot solid strawberry 
soda. 

He then shook hands with his own 
shadow which was imprinted on a 
chemically treated backboard and then 
rolled it up in a box. 

Gears whirling at tremendous speed 
appeared to stand absolutely still when 
seen by red and blue stroboscopic 
lights. 

Paper travelling at 13,000 revolutions 
per minute was photographed by a 
flash exposure of two millionths of a 
second. 

A match then lit an electric lamp 
with the aid of an electric eye. 

An electric train obeyed the com- 
mands "Go ahead! Stop! Now back 
up!" which were given by voice. 

Ultra violet rays were shone on the 
audience's teeth which appeared white 
in the darkness of the auditorium ex- 
cept for false teeth which do not appear 
white under ultra violet rays. 

Sixteen million people have seen the 
House of Magic since its beginning in 
1933. Every army, marine, and navy 
base has seen the show. 

Student chairman, Al Sherman, and 
Professor G. L. Hodgins, counselor for 
American Institute of Electrical Engi- 
neers, arranged for the show. 

DEAN COTTERM AN 

Dr. Harold F. Cotterman, Dean of 
the Faculty, was re-elected a member 
of the Executive Committee of the 
Middle States Association of Colleges 
and Secondary Schools at its recent 
meeting at Atlantic City. 



[15] 



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Office Management Institute 

"rM^HE How of Manpower Utiliza- 
J| tion in the Office" was the sub- 
ject of the Fourth Annual Office Man- 
agement Institute recently held at 
Maryland. 

Speakers and their respective sub- 
jects were: Jerome Barnum, Director, 
Jerome Barnum Associates, Harrison, 
N. Y., "Work Simplification and Meas- 
urement in the Office"; Dr. Robert P. 
Brecht, President of the National Office 
Management Association, "The Office 
Supervisor's Role in Manpower Utili- 
zation"; Vera V. Green, Assistant 
Treasurer and Secretary, Botwinik 
Brothers of Mass., Inc., Worcester, 
Mass., "Women at Work in the Office"; 
Dr. Elizabeth A. Simpson, Adult Read- 
ing Service, Illinois Institute of Tech- 
nology, Chicago, 111., "Reading Im- 
provement in Office Situations"; Horace 
I. Seely, Chief Accountant, Carolina 
Power and Light Company, Raleigh, 
N. C, "Backing Into Common Sense in 
Management"; and Dr. Alfred Cardall, 
President, Cardall Associates, Phila- 
delphia, Pa., "Building Incentives 
Through Job Description, Evaluation 
and Performance Ratings." 

Journalism and P.R. 

Enrollment in the department of 
journalism and public relations jumped 
from 135 to 175 this semester. 

"This was to be expected," Professor 
Alfred Crowell, head of the department, 
said, "because the department is only 
five years old. We have not yet devel- 
oped enough so as to meet the demands 
of the students and publishers." 

Enrollments by 
classes this semes- 
ter are: News Re- 
porting I, 49; News 
Editing I, 26: Fea- 
ture Writing, 25; 
Introduction to 
Public Relations, 
28; Industrial Jour- 
nalism, 5; Report- 
ing of Public Af- 
fairs, 18; Intern- 
ship, 2; History of 
American Journal- 
ism, 12; Public Re- 
lations Ethics, 10. 
Some of the in- 




Prof. Crowell 



creased enrollment was caused by in- 
auguration of a major in public re- 
lations. Twenty-two students started 
working off requirements in this new 
curriculum, the sixth in the United 
States. 

"Many others enrolled with us," Pro- 
fessor Crowell said, "because they were 
attracted by some new equipment and 
added facilities." 



During the past summer the depart- 
ment set up a modern city room con- 
sisting of U-type editing tables and 
typewriters. Available for use are the 
tri-state AP wire service, AP feature 
service, and NEA feature service. 

"Using these services, plus pictures 
and local copy," Professor Crowell 
pointed out, "enable us to do a much 
better job in teaching editing." 

Advanced students in the editing 
class will each spend one night a week 
on the Baltimore Sun desk learning to 
edit copy and write headlines. 

Donald W. Krimel 

Donald W. Krimel of Iowa State Col- 
lege has joined the department staff to 
head up the new major in public rela- 
tions. 

He is teaching the technical PR 
courses and advising the 22 PR majors. 

Mr. Krimel's newspaper experience 
includes editorship of the Elkhorn, Wis., 
Independent, a weekly, and reporting 
for the Wisconsin State Journal, Madi- 
son. He has taught public relations and 
journalism at Iowa State College and 
Ohio University. 

While at Iowa State he produced a 
daily television news cast. He holds a 
master's degree in journalism from the 
University of Wisconsin. 

Technical courses in public relations 
being offered this semester by Professor 
Krimel are Introduction to Public Rela- 
tions, Public Relations Ethics, and 
Feature Writing. Next semester he 
will teach Publicity Writing, Seminar 
in PR, and Picture Editing. 

"We are working closely with the 
professional PR men in Maryland," Mr. 
Krimel said, "so as to develop our cur- 
riculum according to the best judgment 
of leading pi - ofessionals in this area." 

He has met recently with special com- 
mittees appointed for the purpose by 
the Baltimore Public Relations Council 
and by the Washington chapter of the 
Public Relations Society of America. 
Student Press Club 

A student Press Club has been or- 
ganized to send news to weekly publi- 
cations. 

Releases concerning students and the 
university are written by members of 
the club, all journalism majors, to be 
sent out Saturdays to the weekly news- 
papers, from the office of Col. Harvey 
L. Miller, publicity director. 

Several dailies in the state and Wash- 
ington, D. C, have hired journalism 
majors to string for them. 

Officers 

Officers of the Press Club are: 

Edward Herbert, pi-esident, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Barbara Pridgen, secretary, 
University Park, Md.; and Mabelle 
Beck, treasurer, (2702 Lyndhurst Ave.) 
Baltimore. 

Men in the club will seek establish- 
ment of a Sigma Delta Chi chapter on 
the basis of the group's activities in 
furnishing news to the publishers, and 
the women members will petition Theta 
Sigma Phi. 

Internships 

Four of the internships done by jun- 
iors in the journalism department this 
past summer were on newspapers. 

Serving as reporters for the Mary- 



[16] 



land Gazette, Annapolis, were E. M. 
Jackson II, 8 Norwood Rd., Wardour, 
Annapolis, and Joan Wolle, 207 Third 
Ave., S.E., Glen Burnie. 

Neil Regeimbal, 2012 Lanier Drive, 
Silver Spring, did a combination re- 
porting-advertising job for the Takoma 
Journal. This completed his require- 
ments toward a degree at the univer- 
sity and he is now associate editor of 
the Journal. 

David J. Kelly, Greylock St., Lee, 
Mass., did an internship as reporter for 
the Ocean City, N. J., Sentinel-Ledger. 

The internship plan for journalism 
majors is now fairly well established, 
according to Alfred Crowell, head of 
the department. "We are still finding 
some troubles in it, of course," he ex- 
plained, "but by and large we believe 
we are on the right track. 

"Publishers and students are work- 
ing well together on the internships, 
and they seem to be pleased with the 
plan in most respects. Certainly, the 
experience for the student-reporters is 
highly beneficial, and the publishers 
keep inviting us to send them more 
interns as well as graduates." 
Graduates Placed 

The 1951 journalism graduates were 
placed as follows: 

Donald Addor, information clerk, 
Walter Reed Army Hospital, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Gordon Beard, sports re- 
porter, Washington Post; Joseph Bel- 
cher, military service; Howard Blank- 
man, advertising salesman-reporter, 
Democratic Messenger, Snow Hill; 
Francis Brown, information clerk, 
office of Rent Stabilization (U. S.), 
Hyattsville. 

Also, Louis R. Cedrone, reporter, 
Baltimore Sun; G. Robert Little, Jr.. 
editor, Hyattsville, Independent; Eu- 
gene Marceron, public-relations repre- 
sentative, Capital Airlines, National 
Airport; James McCombe, reporter, 
Southern Maryland Times, Annapolis; 
Charles W. Puffenbarger, reporter, 
Virginian-Pilot, Norfolk, Va. 

Neil Regeimbal, associate editor, 
Takoma Park Journal; John Rosson, 
reporter, Maryland Gazette, Annapolis; 
Lt. Bernard M. Serio, military service, 
Boiling Field, Washington, D. C; Ed- 
ward S. Shapiro, promotion manager, 
Southern Wholesalers, Inc., Washing- 
ton, D. C; Robert E. Tall, reporter, 
Telecommunications Reports, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

Dr. Hu Lectures 

Dr. Charles Y. Hu, Professor of Ge- 
ography, has recently delivered lectures 
concerning the situation in Asia to the 
faculty and student body of both the 
Towson Teachers' College, Towson, 
Maryland, and the College of Notre 
Dame in Baltimore, and also the Lions 
Club of Baltimore. 

At Ft. Jackson 

Donald J. Hjerpe of West Hartford, 
Conn., (a BPA student '48-'50), has 
been promoted to Corporal. He is cur- 
rently assigned as platoon sergeant 
with "D" Company, 12th Engineer Bat- 
talion of the 8th Infantry Division at 
Fort Jackson, S. C. 

Cpl. Hjerpe served 12 months with 
the Navy during the last War. 



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[17] 




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clean and neat . . . and easy to use. 
Furnished with carbons pre-inierleaved 
between copies, they are ready for 
writing. Just write then snap them 
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And for further savings in time, as 
well as for additional efficiency, several 
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typing. For example, in one easy 
writing, she can fill in the invoice, 
salesman's copy, file copy, accounting 
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Elected Secretary-Treasurer 

Professor S. M. Wedeberg, College of 
Business and Public Administration, 
was elected Secretary-Treasurer of the 
Grand Council of Beta Alpha Psi, the 
national accounting fraternity, and 
editor of its magazine, at the annual 
meeting in Denver. 

At Fort Jackson 

Peter Giulioni, of Baltimore, a for- 
mer BPA student, has been promoted 
to the rank of corporal at Fort Jackson, 
S. C, where he is assigned to Company 
"E," 61st Infantry, of the famed 8th 
Division. 

Annual Alumni Meeting 

Officers and General Alumni Council 
representatives were elected for 1951- 
52 at the Homecoming Day reunion No- 
vember 3 of alumni of the College of 
Business and Public Administration. 
Despite the wintry weather, the meet- 
ing was well attended by alumni and 
faculty members in the New Class- 
room Building at College Park. 

Norman S. Sinclair, '43, of Washing- 
ton was elected president of the BPA 
Alumni Board. Mr. Sinclair had been 
vice-president the past year. Alvin S. 
Klein, '37, of Frederick, secretary the 
last two years, was chosen vice-presi- 
dent, while David M. Gruber, '43, of 
Washington, newly-elected Board mem- 
ber, was named secretary. 

Talbot T. Speer, '17, of Baltimore, 
president of the University of Mary- 
land Alumni Association, was elected 
for a two-year term to the General 
Alumni Council, while Egbert F. Ting- 
ley, '27, of Hyattsville, retiring Board 
chairman, and Mr. Sinclair were chosen 
for one-year terms on the Council. 
Joseph C. Longridge, '26, of College 
Park was elected alternate Council 
member. 

By unanimous vote, it was decided 
to increase the membership of the BPA 
Board from eight to twelve. Beginning 
this year, directors are to be elected in 
groups of four in successive years for 
three-year terms. Under the adopted 
resolution, the terms of present mem- 
bers of the Board are extended for one 
year so that those whose terms were 
scheduled to expire with the 1951 meet- 
ing will be continued until the annual 
meeting in 1952, those scheduled to ex- 
pire in 1952 will continue to 1953, and 
the new directors just elected will serve 
until 1954. This change in the consti- 
tution was adopted in order to obtain 
wider representation and to increase 
interest and activity on the part of 
BPA alumni. 

It was also voted to amend the con- 
stitution so that one director would be 
elected annually to serve for a two- 
year term on the General Alumni Coun- 
cil. Purpose of this change was to as- 
sure experienced representation on the 
Council from year to year. 

In addition to Mr. Gruber, new mem- 
bers elected to the BPA Alumni Board 
were: Harry A. Boswell, Jr., '42, of 
Hyattsville; Norman M. Glasgow, '43, 
of Takoma Park, Md.; and Joseph H. 
Fitzpatrick, Jr., '49, of Greenbelt. 

Besides Messrs. Sinclair, Klein, Speer, 
Tingley and Longridge, holdover mem- 



bers of the Board are: Edgar H. Coney, 
'26, of Baltimore; Linwood 0. Jarrell, 
'47, of Greensboro, and Charles B. 
Sewell, '49, of Baltimore. 

A complete report of the past year's 
activities was presented by Mr. Tingley, 
the retiring president. Importance of 
disseminating news of the college and 
its alumni through the columns of 
Maryland was stressed. Recalling that 
several board meetings had been held 
the past year at College Park, he urged 
that future gatherings be scheduled 
also in other sections of the State. 

Mr. Longridge rendered an interest- 
ing account of the wox - k done the last 
year by the Scholarship Committee of 
the General Alumni Council, of which 
he was chairman. He announced that 
a definite scholarship program has now 
been adopted by the General Council 
for the University, which will be placed 
in effect in the near future as soon as 
certain details of the plan are decided 
upon by the committee. 

Dean J. Freeman Pyle told the group 
that the activities of the College of 
Business and Public Administration 
were continually expanding and that 
further growth was anticipated. He 
stated that Maryland was now rated 
among the top universities in the 
nation in the field of business education. 

Bronze Star to Clark 

Lt. Herbert E. (Snark) Clark, B.P.A., 
'49, after serving with the 82nd Air- 
borne in Europe during the last con- 
flict, returned to his Alma Mater where 
he was a member of Scabbard and 
Blade and also Theta Chi fraternity. 
After graduation, he re-entered the 
active duty phase of the Army, this 
time in the Infantry, leaving for Korea 
the latter part of 1950. Recently he 
was the recipient of the Bronze Star — 
for which the citation read as follows: 

"Award of the Bronze Star Medal 
with Letter "V" device for heroic 
achievement in connection with military 
operations a.gainst an enemy of the 
United States. 

First Lt. Herbert E. Clark, 061215, 
United States Army, a member of Com- 
pany K, 38th Infantry Regiment, 2nd 
Infantry Division, distinguished him- 
self by heroic achievement on 17 May 
1951 in the vicinity of Pungchon-in, 
Korea. During the hours of darkness 
on that date, Lt. Clark was ordered to 
counter attack with his platoon to re- 
duce an enemy penetration of the de- 
fensive line. Skillfully laying down a 
base of fire with all available support- 
ing weapons, he deployed his men for 
the attack. Then, with complete dis- 
regard for his own safety and oblivious 
of the intense enemy small arms, gre- 
nade and mortar fire, he led his men in 
a furious assault with grenades and 
bayonets, greatly inspiring his men by 
his personal example of courage. The 
platoon thus succeeded, in regaining 
the lost ground with heavy losses to 
the enemy. The heroism displayed by 
Lt. Clark reflects great credit upon 
himself and the military service. 

Entered the military service from 
Maryland." 

His wife, the former Jean Highbar- 
ger, '47, is residing in Hagerstown, 
with their young daughter, Bonnie. 



[18] 



In New York 

Dr. John H. Frederick, Professor of 
Transportation and Foreign Trade, con- 
ducted a forum on Education and Train- 
ing at the Merchant Marine Confer- 
ence held in New York City. Dr. Fred- 
erick has been re-elected a National 
Vice-President of the Propeller Club of 
the United States and as such adminis- 
ters the activities of thirty-six student 
"ports" affiliated with the national or- 
ganization and located at various uni- 
versities and maritime academies. The 
student port at the University of Mary- 
land has forty-five members this year 
and is one of the most active in the 
country. 

Security Conference 

The College of Business and Public 
Administration and the Maryland 
Chapter of the International Associa- 
tion of Public Employment Services is 
sponsoring a two-day conference on 
"Employee Security" on February 1 and 
2, 1952. Among those who will address 
the conference is Dr. Harold F. Syl- 
vester, Professor of Personnel Admin- 
istration, who will speak on "A Bill of 
Rights for Employees." The first day's 
session will be held at the Central Au- 
ditorium, College Park and the second 
at the Offices of the Division of Em- 
ployment Security in Baltimore. The 
public is invited to both sessions. 

Authors Article 

George W. Frank, Associate Profes- 
sor of Accounting in the Department of 
Business Organization and Administra- 
tion of the College of B.P.A. is the 
author of an article appearing in the 
November issue of the magazine 
"Credit and Financial Management." 
The article titled "Ratios an Integral 
Part of Credit Analysis" deals with how 
the credit executive can use certain ra- 
tios, derived for him by the accounting 
department, in making decisions re- 
garding credit granting. 

Suggests Movies 

"Starting with a committee of teach- 
ers, professional people and other lead- 
ing citizens," Dr. I. I. Raines of the 
Marketing Division said recently, "a 
small-town movie exhibitor could un- 
derwrite regular showings of outstand- 
ing films." 

He was speaking in relation to a 
problem uncovered recently in which he 
found small-town exhibitors cannot af- 
ford the better cultural motion picture. 

To alleviate that problem, he has sug- 
gested starting clubs in the towns to 
underwrite the cost of the better pic- 
tures. 

Memberships paid in advance would 
include a specified number of admis- 
sions which would be used at any of 
the showings of films selected by the 
club, he said. 

Cost per person probably would work 
out to a figure comparable with first 
showings of these films in metropolitan 
centers, Dr. Raines believes. As an in- 
centive to subscribe, the general ad- 
mission to these films would be ad- 
vanced above the cost to members, he 
said. 

Although the organization of such a 
club would require intensive promotion, 
he said, it should provide a solution to 



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FROM LONDON, ENGLAND 

Left to right:- John H. Frederick, Professor of Transportation; Dean J. Freeman Pyle of the 
College of Business and Public Administration; W. H. Stebbings, Examination Officer, Institute of 
Transport, London, England; Charles A. Taff, Assistant Professor of Transportation. 

Mr. W. H. Stebbings, being greeted by Dean Pyle, is on a tour of the various universities of 
this country where courses in transportation are offered in order to evaluate the work in transport 
education offered in the United States. 



the problem of the small-town ex- 
hibitor. 

At Stanford 

Dr. Robert G. Dixon, Jr., assistant 
professor of Government and Politics, 
is on leave of absence this year to study 
law at Stanford University under a 
Ford Foundation grant. His place for 
the year is being filled by Dr. Richard 
B. Johnson, who has been assistant pro- 
fessor at Tufts College. 

Book On Greenbelt 

The Bureau of Public Administration, 
College of Business and Public Admin- 
istration, recently published a booklet, 
The Government of Greenbelt. Copies 
may be obtained from the Bureau. 

Brooks Adams 

Dr. Thornton Anderson, of the Gov- 
ernment and Politics Department, is 
the author of a book entitled Brooks 
Adams, Constructive Conservative, 
which will be published December 10 
by the Cornell University Press. 

Accounting Techniques 

Business Administration students 
learned the latest accounting tech- 
niques during a series of lectures and 
demonstrations of business machines 
and equipment beginning November 15 
and ending on December 4. The pro- 
gram was designed to introduce the 
junior and senior business administra- 
tion students to the latest methods and 
systems being used by business in per- 
forming the accounting tasks students 
have learned in the classroom. 

Conducted by the Education Divi- 
sions of the Burroughs Adding Machine 
Company and the National Cash Regis- 
ter Company, the series of instructional 
periods included lectures and practical 
illustrations in such fields as billing, 
accounts receivable, accounts payable, 
payroll, general accounting, cost ac- 
counting, budgetary accounting, bank 
accounting, microfilming and statistics. 

The Burroughs Adding Machine 
Company demonstrated twenty-six of 
the latest model adding, bookkeeping, 
accounting and microfilm machines, and 
the National Cash Register Company 



used approximately the same number 
of machines in their course. The series 
is part of the University's program to 
equip students with practical knowl- 
edge of business methods. 

Tau Chapter of Beta Alpha Psi and 
the Accounting Club jointly sponsored 
two field trips to Peat, Marwick, Mit- 
chell and Company, certified public ac- 
countants, in Baltimore. 

At the annual meeting in Denver, 
Colorado, in September, Professor 
Wedeberg was elected secretary-trea- 
surer of the Grand Council of Beta 
Alpha Psi, the national accounting fra- 
ternity; also editor of their magazine. 

Publishes Book 
Dr. Henry W. Grayson, a new mem- 
ber of the Department of Economics, 
is publishing a book on Economic Plan- 
ning and Forecasting with the Public 
Affairs Press of Washington, D. C. 

In Boston 

Dr. Allan G. Gruchy, Professor of 
Economics, participated in a round 
table discussion on methodology in eco- 
nomics at the annual meetings of the 
American Economic Association in Bos- 
ton. Dr. Grunchy is now writing a book 
on the Economics of National Defense, 
which will be published by the Mc- 
Graw-Hill Book Company. 

Heads Economics 

Dr. Dudley Dillard, new Head of the 
Economics Department, taught in the 
Summer Session at Columbia Univer- 
sity in New York City during July and 
August. Professor Dillard's book on 
The Economics of John Maynard 
Keynes has appeared in a Japanese 
translation, and Spanish and Italian 
translations are scheduled for publica- 
tion during 1952. 

Assistant Instructor 

Henry Trebing, Maryland 1950, is 
now an Assistant Instructor in the De- 
partment of Economics. 

In Philippines 

Lt. Carlton H. Miller, '50, recently 
arrived in the Philippines to serve a 
tour of duty with the U. S. Air Force. 



[•-'"] 



The lieutenant, who is a jet fighter 
pilot, is now assigned to the 44th 
Fighter Bomber Squadron, Thirteenth 
Air Force with headquarters on Clark 
Air Force Base, located 60 miles north 
of Manila. 

Formerly connected with the Capital 
Airlines, Washington, D. C, Lieutenant 
Miller joined the Air Force for the 
first time in January 1945 as an air- 
man. He re-entered the service in June 
1950 and attended Jet Fighter School at 
Williams AFB, Arizona. Before leav- 
ing for the Philippines, he was sta- 
tioned at Perrin AFB, Texas. 

Lieutenant Miller is the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. Chester H. Miller 4318 Van 
Buren St., University Park. 

Maryland Report Quoted 

The first issue of Housing Research, 
a new publication of the Housing and 
Home Finance Agency, contains a 
summary made of the final report on 
mortgage financing in Hagerstown, 
authored by Dr. John H. Cover. 

Correction 

Our sincere apologies to the family 
of Malcolm L. Calder. The last issue of 
"MARYLAND" contained an item 
about Mr. Calder taken from an Alum- 
ni History Record. The unfortunate 
mistake occurred since we were doing 
our best to publish news about B.P.A. 
alumni and through a shortage of 
news used old history record forms. 
A 1950 issue of "MARYLAND" carried 
the news of the death of Mr. Calder 
in August of 1949. To avoid such em- 
barrassments of the future, may we 
have your help in submitting current 
news about yourself and other alumni. 
In Three Languages 

"The Economics of John Maynard 
Keynes" by Dr. Dudley, new head of the 
Economics Department, has appeared 
in a Japanese translation. Spanish and 
Italian translations are scheduled for 
publication during 1952. 
In Boston 

Dr. Allan G. Gruchy, Professor of 
Economics, participated in a round 
table discussion on methodology in 
economics at the annual meetings of 
the American Economic Association in 
Boston. Dr. Gruchy is now writing a 
book on the Economics of National 
Defense, which will be published by the 
McGraw-Hill Book Company. 

Baltimore In Import Competition 

A study, "Baltimore in Import Com- 
petition," has been issued by the 
Bureau of Business and Economic 
Research of the University of Mary- 
land, as a companion volume to "Balti- 
more in Export Trade," released in 
September. Included in the analysis, 
which covers the last sixteen years, are 
the principal United States ports and 
Costal areas. 

In commenting upon the relative 
position of ports of the Atlantic Coast, 
the report reads: 

"As in the case of exports, New York, 
Philadelphia and Baltimore receive the 
bulk of imports of the Atlantic Coast. 
From 1935 to 1943, these three major 
ports accounted for 71 per cent or more 





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of Atlantic Coast imports. Subsequent- 
ly, this ratio declined. Consequently, 
although each of the three ports has 
shown very rapid growth in the years 
since the war, as a group their position 
is less favorable. 

"Actually, however, the declining 
ratio results largely from the relative 
decline of New York imports. During 
the years 1935 to 1941 Philadelphia 
imports never accounted for more than 
13.9 per cent of Atlantic Coast totals, 
whereas since 1946, receipts of that 
port have grown from about 13.5 to 
21 per cent, Baltimore's share of im- 
ports ranged from 13 to 19 per cent 
in the years prior to the war; from 
1947 through 1949 they exceeded 18 
per cent, declining to 15.3 per cent in 
1950. In contrast, New York Imports 
accounted for from 40 to 45 per cent 
of Atlantic Coast imports in the pre- 
war years, and rose to a peak of 61.9 
per cent in 1943. In the postwar period 
it has not exceeded 32 per cent of the 
Atlantic Coast. 

A hypothesis exists that ports con- 
centrating upon bulk staples have been 
favored in post war growth. This will 
be further examined in the commodity 
analysis of imports." 

In 1942 

The flow of imports to Baltimore 
reacted violently to the outbreak of the 
war. In 1942 the volume declined from 
the level of the preceding year by 8 
billion pounds. Although recovery was 
gradual starting in 1944, it was not 
until 1947 that the volume of Balti- 
more imports exceeded the volumes of 
the prewar peak years of 1937 and 
1941. 

The greatest amount of wartime dis- 
placement was suffered by Philadel- 
phia; the least by New York. 

Levels of imports below normal con- 
tinued for the longest period of time 
by Baltimore, but for only one year by 
New York. Philadelphia imports oc- 
cupied the intermediate position. 

Although it was the most stable 
import port, New York's growth rate 
appears to be less than that of the 
other ports. The greatest rate of 
growth occurred in Philadelphia. 

There are indications that the post 
war growth rate for Balto. is less than 
prewar rate. Philadelphia's post war 
rate vastly exceeds its prewar rate. 
The moderate rate of growth of New 
York was fairly constant from 1935 
to 1950. Since the latter growth rate 
was less than that for the coast as a 
whole in the postwar years, New York 
currently receives a smaller proportion 
of Atlantic Coast imports than prior 
to the war. 

Primarily Importer 

Baltimore is primarily an importer 
of a limited number of bulk commod- 
ities. During the period of 1946 to 
1950, three classes of commodities, 
petroleum, iron ore, and ferro alloys, 
have composed more than four-fifths 
of the volume of Baltimore imports. 
Iron ore has consistently been the lead- 
ing import commodity, with petroleum 
and ferro alloys following in that order. 

During the years prior to the war, 
receipts of iron ore average about four 



[22] 



ana one-half billion pounds annually 
and ranged from 35 to 45 per cent of 
Baltimore receipts. Iron ore imports 
dwindled to a trickle during the war 
years, 31 million pounds in 1943, and 
64 million pounds in 1944. Recovery 
was immediate after the cessation of 
hostilities. In 1946 iron ore imports 
leaped to 3.4 billion pounds. The in- 
crease in volume continued steadily 
from that time, in 1950 amounting to 
10.4 billion pounds. Although volumes 
continued to increase, the rate of 
growth declined from 1947 to 1950. 
The 10 billion pounds imported in 1950 
represented 42.8 per cent of Baltimore 
imports in that year. It is interesting 
to note that this is about the same pro- 
portion for the years prior to the war. 

The Bureau of Census published im- 
port tables giving breakdowns by port, 
by commodity, and by country of origin, 
for only one year, 1946. Similar tables 
have been specially prepared by the 
University of Maryland Bureau from 
unpublished Census data for 1950, in 
order to make possible the comparison 
of the countries of origin in 1946 with 
those of the later year. 

In 1946 more than four-fifths of 
Baltimore iron ore imports originated 
in Chile, while Scandinavian countries 
supplied the only other significant pro- 
portions. By 1950, though Chile was 
represented with 56 per cent of iron 
ore imports into Baltimore, Sweden 
had recovered from 2.2 per cent of 1946 
to 26.5 per cent. Brazil was third as a 
source with 9 per cent. 

There is expectation that the level 
of iron ore imports through the Port 
of Baltimore may increase substan- 
tially in the future. The bulk of Balti- 
more's ore receipts are consumed by 
Bethlehem Steel Plant at Sparrows 
Point, Maryland. In 1951 the first 
shipments of iron ore from the Bethle- 
hem owned ore fields south of the 
Orinocco River in Venezuela arrived 
in Baltimore. In time the output from 
this field is expected to reach six billion 
pounds annually. In anticipation, it 
may be put into production by the 
United Steel Corporation in a few 
years. Baltimore has been indicated as 
a major port of entry for this ore. 
Post War Period 

Baltimore's imports of petroleum and 
products consist primarily of fuel oil, 
including bunker oil, and crude petro- 
leum. Imports of gasoline and other 
motor fuel, kerosene, lubricating oil, 
petroleum, asphalt or other petroleum 
products are negligible or non-existent. 

The trend of petroleum imports has 
been upward in the post war period, 
rising from 4 billion pounds in 1946 
to 5.2 billion pounds in 1950. The latter 
volume is a decline from the 5.5 billion 
pounds imported in 1949. 

In 1946 the island of Curacao in the 
Netherlands Antilles and Venezuela 
accounted for 95.0 per cent of Balti- 
more imports of petroleum and prod- 
ucts. The pattern of receipts is similar 
for 1950. An even greater concentra- 
tion of sources is shown. Venezuela 
and the Netherlands Antilles account 
for 99.2 per cent of imports of petro- 
leum and products through Baltimore. 



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Faculty and Alumni 
Participants at A.D.A. Meeting 

^^EVERAL alumni and members of 
^^ the faculty participated in the 
various meetings and clinics scheduled 
during the annual meeting of the Den- 
tal Association held in Washington, 
October 15-18. 

Dr. George M. Anderson '19, of Balti- 
more, presented a paper on the "Eco- 
nomic Phases of Orthodontics" before 
the Sections on Orthodontics and Prac- 
tice Management. 

Dr. I. Norton Brotman '36, of Balti- 
more, had a table clinic, "Application 
of Hydrocolloid Technic for a Case of 
Full Mouth Reconstruction (Koda- 
chromes and Models)." 

Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio '46, Assist- 
ant Professor of Oral Surgery and 
Anesthesiology, gave a table clinic on 
"Hospital Oral Surgery." 

Dr. Brice M. Dorsey '27, Professor 
of Oral Surgery and Anesthesiology, 
was an essayist on the program of the 
Section on Oral Surgery. His subject 
was "Swellings of the Face, Neck, and 
Oral Cavity." 

Dr. Edward R. Johnston '48, and Dr. 
Robert F. Lamb '47, who are stationed 
at Boiling Field, collaborated in a table 
clinic, Threequarter Crown for Anterior 
Teeth." 

Dr. Marshall I. Kader '39, Instructor 
in Oral Surgery, had a table clinic 
demonstrating the "Use of Forceps in 
Oral Surgery." 

Dr. Harry B. McCarthy '23, Director 
of Clinics, presented a paper, "Period- 
ontia Should Be an Economic Asset 
to Your Practice," before the combined 
Sections on Periodontia and Practice 
Management. Dr. McCarthy was elect- 
ed chairman of the Judicial Council of 
the A.D.A. 

Dr. Ernest B. Nuttall '31, Professor 
of Fixed Partial Prosthesis, presented 
an essay before the combined Sections 
on Operative Dentistry and Partial 
Dentive Prosthesis. His subject was 
"Diagnosis and Correction of Osslusal 
Disharmonies in the Preparation for 
Fixed Restorations." Dr. Nuttall also 
gave a television clinic demonstrating 
"Methods for Indirect Impressions Us- 
ing Hjyd rocolloid Compound and Wax." 

Dr. Charles T. Pridgeon ' 35, of 
Patuxent River, Md., had a table clinic, 
"A Modern Approach to the Clinical 
Treatment of Acute Necrotizing Gin- 
givitis." 

Dr. Samuel Pruzansky '45, of Chi- 
cago, presented a paper on the "Appli- 
cation of Electromyography to Dental 
Research" before the combined Sec- 
tions on Orthodontics and Research. 

Dr. Gerald J. Rose '45, of Washing- 
ton, collaborated in a table clinic on 
"Functional Occlusal Displacement — 



Analysis and Treatment." 

Dr. David B. Scott '43 (March), of 
the National Institute of Dental Re- 
search at Bethesda, Md., was a collab- 
orator of an essay on the "Study of 
Enamel by Electron Microscopy," pre- 
sented before the Section on Research. 
Dr. Walter T. Walsh '23, of Balti- 
more, gave a table clinic on "Impres- 
sion Technic for Partial Dentures 
Where There Are No Teeth Distal to 
the Saddle Area." 

Dr. Clifford L. Whitman '27, of Hack- 
ensack, N. J., had a table clinic on 
"The Importance of Controlling Habits 
in All Phases of Dentistry." 
Alumni Registration in Washington 
The School of Dentistry alumni 
maintained headquarters at the Hotel 
Mayflower during the A.D.A. meeting. 
A large group of alumni were present 
at the Maryland Alumni Breakfast 
which was served at the Mayflower, 
October 17. Below are listed the names, 
locations, and class of each alumnus 
who registered at the headquai'ters, at- 
tended the breakfast or was seen at 
the Meeting. 

1905 — J. Clarence Allen, Wilbraham, 
Mass. 

1907— R. H. Mills, Washington, D. C. 
1910— Arthur L. Davenport, Balti- 
more. 

1911— Allen G. T. Twigg, Cumber- 
land, Md. 

1912— W. L. Lloyd, Brunswick, Md. 
1913 — E. C. Carpenter, Maplewood, 
N. J.; J. E. Topping, Roanoke, Va. 
1914 — J. Ben Robinson, Baltimore. 
1915 — James H. Ferguson, Balti- 
more; C. L. Inman, Baltimore; R. P. 
Arrajo, Washington, D. C. 

1916— A. C. Albert, Huntington, W. 
Va.; Kyle T. Lee, Roanoke, Va. 

1917 — Thomas Bland, Baltimore; 
James P. Dewhurst, Cumberland, Md.; 
Frank Houghton, New Orleans, La. 

1918— Edwin G. Gail, Baltimore; C. 
J. Maristani Puerto Rico. 

1919 — George Anderson, Baltimore; 
Arthur Bell, Baltimore; H. W. Miller, 
Waterbury, Conn.; Arthur C. Muhl- 
bach, Baltimore; C. E. Peterson, Rock- 
ville, Conn.; H. R. Williams, Cumber- 
land, Md.; B. R. Morrison, Wilmington, 
Del. 

1921— Nathan Byer, Trenton, N. J.; 
Leonard Davis, Baltimore. 

1922— Winfield J. Atno, Newark, N. 
J.; Ronald C. Dove, U. S. Navy. 

1923— W. V. Adair, Baltimore; Ger- 
ard A. Devlin, Newark, N. J. 

1924 — Anthony L. DeFita, Livings- 
ton, N. J.; A. R. Janis, Silver Springs, 
Md.; James McCarl, Greenbelt, Md. 

1925— E. M. Colvin, Washington, D. 
C; B. A. Dickson, Marion, N. C; 
Harold Golton, Baltimore; N. Munera, 
Puerto Rico; George D. Resh, Hamp- 
stead, Md.; F. Ulanet, Newark, N. J. 
1926— Ardie William Gregory, Balti- 
more; Harry Levin, Baltimore; W. M. 
Newell, St. Augustine, Fla. 

1927— Samuel H. Byer, Trenton, N. 
J.; J. P. Fitzgerald, Washington, D. C; 
Paul Hoffman, Washington, D. C; 
Frank Hurst, Washington, D. C; Albin 
W. Rauch, N. J.; James Holdstock, 
Tampa, Fla.; Dick Shoaf, Lexington, 
N. C. 



[24] 



1928— W. C. Basehoar, Bethesda, 
Md.; Byron R. Branch, Watertown, 
Mass.; Melvin H. Colvin, Washington, 
D. C; E. F. Corey, Baltimore; Paul A. 
Deems, Baltimore; Charles K. Gould, 
Washington, D. C; W. B. Mehring, 
Silver Spring, Md. 

1929— Charles W. Buttermore, U. S. 
Army; Edward C. Dobbs, Baltimore; 
Fred S. Harold, New Haven, Conn.; 
James F. Lewis, Chicago, 111.; Max 
N. Matzkin, Waterbury, Conn.; Mau- 
rice J. Savitz, Roxbury, Mass.; Nelson 
J. Thomas, Baltimore (USAF). 

1930 — John F. Maguire, Wilmington, 
Del.; F. J. McNerney, Baltimore. 

1931 — J. D. Cross, Leonardtown, 
Md.; C. Landis Currey, Shippensburg, 
Pa.; William E. Hahn, Catonsville, Md.; 
J. J. Tew, Clayton, N. C. 

1932— Samuel H. Bryant, Baltimore; 
A. James Kershaw, West Warwick, R. 
I.; J. S. Wickes, Roanoke, Va. 

1933— M. E. Brown, Fairmont, W. 
Va.; R. N. Hunt, Lexington, N. C; 
Charles E. McGarry, Baltimore. 

1934— L. W. Bimestefer, Dundalk, 
Md.; A. Heefner, Everett, Pa. 

1935— W. W. Noel, Hagerstown, Md.; 
D. C. Woodall, Erwin, N. C; Gerald 
Shoben, Baltimore. 

1936— Eugene J. Dionne, Fall River, 
Mass.; Philip R. E. Hampson, Balti- 
more; Joseph F. Metz, Baltimore; Al- 
vin A. Greenberg, Baltimore. 

1937 — Joseph Byer, Pennington, N. 
J.; James A. Fulmer, Fountain Inn, 
S. C; Donald B. Jones, Takoma Park, 
Md.; Richard E. Richardson, Buena 
Vista, Va. 

1938— Milton B. Asbell, Camden, N. 
J.; Frank A. Lasley, Jr., Staunton, Va.; 
Charles P. McCausland, Towson, Md.; 
Jack M. Messner, Washington, D. C; 
Ernest V. Williams, Washington, D. 
C; John P. Barker, Laurel, Md.; Nich- 
olas A. Guiditta, Westfield, N. J.; 
Julian W. Habercam, Baltimore; Sid- 
ney Lieberman, Baltimore. 

1939 — James C. Davis, Winchester, 
Va.; Robert E. Jacoby, Chevy Chase, 
Md.; H. J. Hoffacker, Hanover, Pa.; 
Naomi A. Dunn, New Britain, Conn.; 
Irving W. Eichenbaum, New Britain, 
Conn.; Harold E. Plaster, Shelby, N. C; 
Dorsey R. Tipton, Baltimore. 

1940 — E. L. Pessagno, Baltimore; 
Benjamin A. Dabrowski, Baltimore. 

1941 — Joseph P. Burch, Barstown, 
California. 

1942 — Jason Lewis, Richmond, Va.; 
Glenn D. Steele, Catonsville, Md. 

1943— Russell P. Smith, Jr., Cam- 
bridge, Md.; John W. Menius, Jr., 
Asheboro, N. C; John P. Blevins, 
Washington, D. C; Marvin S. Yalo- 
vitz, Anniston, Alabama; Robert H. 
Bernert, Hartford, Conn. 

1944— Lloyd Eugene Church, Beth- 
esda, Md.; David H. Dosh, Veterans 
Administration, D. C; Harold H. Gil- 
bert, Baltimore; Saul Goodman, Plain- 
ville, Conn.; Robert M. Olive, Jr., Fay- 
etteville, N. C; W. Edward Pfeifer, 
Jr., Laurel, Md.; Robert P. Shapiro, 
LTnionville, Conn. 

1945 — Boyce A. Brawley, Moores- 
ville, N. C; Robert A. George, Mount 
Airy, N. C; Robert Long, Statesville, 
N. C; Gerald J. Rose, Washington, D. 



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C; Charles P. White; Ralph M. Bishop, 
Bethesda, Md. 

1946 — George B. LaMotte, Jr., Serv- 
ice; Charles P. Bove, Service; Bedell R. 
Delorme, Service. 

1947 — Robert F. Lamb, Asbury Park, 
N. J.; Stuart R. Londeree, Baltimore; 
Edmond G. Vanden Bosche, Baltimore; 
Warren W. Cook, Fort Dix, N. J. 

1948 — Leondard Copen, Brockton, 
Mass.; Theresa Edwards, Beckley, W. 
Va.; W. A. George, Norfolk, Va.; Ben 
A. Williamowsky, Washington, D. C; 
Eugene R. Zimmermann, Bethesda, Md. 

1949— George E. O'Roark, Washing- 
ton, D. C; Sidney Herman, Washing- 
ton, D. C. 

1950— Kenneth K. Kline, Wheeling, 
W. Va. ; Auvil C. Hannah, Salisbury, 
Md.; David H. Bloom, Hagerstown, 
Md.; Francis L. Edwards, Beckley, W. 
Va.; Clem Hahn, Berea, Ky.; P. M. 
Mitchell, Trenton, N. J.; L. S. Noel, 
Hagerstown, Md. ; Herbert Shapiro, 
Baltimore; Charles T. Schwa tcka, Jr., 
Boiling Field. 

1951— Millard M. Bartlett, Balti- 
more; Eugene S. Armstrong, Green- 
ville, S. C.J Harry R. McCauley, Jr., 
Baltimore; Carl P. Brigada, Service; 
Ralph W. McCue, Boiling Field; For- 
rest G. McDougal, Service; Robert I. 
Swan, Service. 

Reunion of Class of 1911 

Four members of the combined grad- 
uating classes of 1911 attended their 
Fortieth Reunion. 

T. J. Clagett— Easton, Md. 

L. P. Henneberger — Baltimore. 

Gabriel K. Jureidini — Brooklyn, N. Y. 

David C. White— Springfield State 
Hospital, Catonsville, Md. 

Class of 1916 Reunion 

The Thirty-fifth Reunion of the com- 
bined classes of 1916 was attended by 
ten of the thirty-two surviving mem- 
bers of the group. The returning men 
held their reunion in conjunction with 
the dinner of the National Alumni 
Association. 

Albert Z. Aldridge — Baltimore. 

Max K. Baklor — Baltimore. 

D. C. Blevins— Washington, D. C. 

Gerald I. Brandon — Baltimore. 

Wilbur Jackson — Clinton, N. C. 

John R. Funderburk — Cheraw, S. C. 

Kyle Lee — Roanoke, Va. 

William F. Martin — Baltimore. 

Roy P. May— York, Pa. 

Albert J. Nathanson— Baltimore. 

Class of 1936 Reunion 
(Contributed by H. B. McCauley) 

It is a long time between class re- 
unions and a lot of things happen to 
people in the meantime. So when those 
who received their sheepskins for com- 
pleting the course in dentistry in 1936 
met to celebrate fifteen years of "out" 
this past June, there was no end of 
interest in the perennial questions of 
who, what, when, where and why by 
classmate about classmate. 

It was gratifying to see so many 
familiar faces on hand at the dinner, 
aptly arranged by a committee headed 
by Stuart Buppert and including Ray 
Paskell, Norton Brotman and Wallace 
Inman. Thirty-three of us enjoyed a 



[26] 



wonderful evening in the Chesapeake 
Lounge of the Emerson Hotel, replete 
with "coffee glotching," reminiscence 
and collateral extracurricular activities. 

An air of opulence prevailed over the 
occasion which, coupled with distin- 
guished bearing and generous cross 
sections on the part of those who 
showed up, testified that life had been 
good during the past fifteen years. All 
of us happily noted that the belle of 
1936, Carlotta Hawley, was in no way 
affected by time unless it be akin to 
the aging of wine. Hunter was in- 
capacitated by poliomyelitis and three 
of our esteemed companions had de- 
parted this world: Glaser, Johnston, 
and Tully. 

After fitting and proper libations and 
a memorable meal of roast beef and 
burgundy, the roll was called and each 
was asked to relate his major experi- 
ences since student days, with the 
following results: 

Arends — Happy and prosperous. 
Practicing near Washington. Ted has 
two boys. 

Baylin — Has a swell parking lot and 
beautiful bungalow dental office with 
hot and cold running patients in north- 
west Baltimore. Offspring include one 
girl 12^ years old, a boy 8V2 years 
old. Total weight 265 pounds (George, 
not the kids). 

Blanchard — Looks exactly as he did 
fifteen years ago. Has a record of three 
years of naval service. He has three 
girls: 8, 6 and 2 years of age. 

Brotman — Norton is very prosperous 
looking. He spent three years in the 
Army. Has a boy 10 years old. 

Buppert — Still a great golfer. 
Healthiest ulcer patient on record. 
Has four boys and two girls. As gen- 
eral chairman of arrangements for the 
reunion, Stuart distinguished himself 
by designating Ray Paskell to do the 
work. 

Corbin — Practicing in Belair, Mary- 
land. Wears a crew cut, looks amply 
fed, and has three girls: 13, 9 and 7 
years old. 

Corthouts— As engaging as ever. 
Said it was a pleasure to find his name 
correctly spelled on his souvenier beer 
mug. Married, and has six kids. Re- 
quested that bunsen burner borrowed 
16 years ago be returned. 

Cronin — Still wearing the same tie, 
but with a bigger knot. Spent four 
years in the Pacific with the Aimy. 
Jack has three boys, 5, 3 and 2. Prac- 
ticing in Hyattsville. 

Di Gristine — Mike has an office out 
on West Baltimore Street and a boy 
13 years old. 

Donohue — Shows evidence of expan- 
sion but no change in the famous Dono- 
hue smile. Practicing in Baltimore. 
Terry has two boys, 9 and 4, and a girl 
6 years old. 

Friedman — This gentleman recently 
moved his office to 914 North Charles 
Street Avenue. Sam has attained the 
marks of a successful professional 
man, graying at the temples, discreet 
distribution of avoirdupois, and two 
boys 11 and 6 years of age. 

Greenberg — By virtue of a recently 
completed course at Penn, Alvin is now 




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[27] 




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a Park Avenue children's dentist. Mar- 
ried fifteen years, no children. 

Hawley — Carlotta is following in her 
father's footsteps as an edgewise arch 
orthodontist in Washington. 

Hoffman — Has been married fifteen 
years. Has two boys, 9 and 5, and a 
two-year Army record. Practicing in 
Baltimore. 

Horowitz — The name is "Moose." He 
had on a bow tie and new suit. Practic- 
ing in East Orange, N. J. Has two 
girls, 9 and 4. Spent three years in 
the Army. 

Inman — Practicing with his uncle 
in the Medical Arts Building. Spent 
four years in the Pacific with the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Hospital unit. 
Wallace has two girls, 10 and 5, and 
a boy 3 years old. 

Jerome — Practicing in West New 
York. Four years in the Army. Has 
two girls, 1 and 3 years of age. 

Kaufman — Vernon spent ten years 
teaching oral surgery at the dental 
school. Now doing very well for him- 
self out on Wilkens Avenue. He has a 
lovely wife, two daughters and a 
"shore." 

Klotz— The "South Jersey Flash." 
Informed us that he has been married 
forever. 

Kress — Bill is secretary of the Balti- 
more City Dental Society. Practicing 
orthodontics in Baltimore and Bethesda. 

Kuta — Bruno has had a siege of 
tough luck with an injured back. Mar- 
ried seventeen years. Has two boys, 
9 and 11. Is working hard to fluoridate 
the water supplies of North Jersey. 

Lacher — The sage of northeast 
Baltimore. Has a girl 10 and boy 8. 

Levinson — Louie is practicing in 
Washington and has apparently learn- 
ed much of life. He gave us a very 
serious speech on the vicissitudes of 
living and the common denominator 
(whatever that is). 

McCauley — Attempted to receive an 
education for teaching purposes and 
ended up trying to fluoridate the Balti- 
more water supply as the first full- 
time Dental Director for the city. Spent 
four years researching with the U. S. 
Public Health Service. 

Metz — Between jokes and trips to 
Atlantic City, Joe has managed to raise 
two children and keep busily engaged 
in his practice on the corner of Harford 
and North in Baltimore. 

Orman — Herb has added a little 
around the middle and taken consider- 
able off the top, but he is still the 
wonderful guy that we remember. 

Paskell — The genial host who did so 
much to make the reunion a success. 
He looks good and feels good, has two 
boys, 12 and 3 years old, and has four 
years of Army life behind him. 

Philpot — Practicing in Elizabeth and 
living in Cranford, N. J. Has a girl 
8 years old, a boy 4 years old, and a 
three-year Army record. 

Riddlesberger — Practicing in Carl- 
isle, Pa. Spent three years in the Navy. 
Has two boys, 13 and 16 years old. 

Schoenbrun — At the time of the re- 
union this esteemed gentleman was 
President-elect of the Passaic Dental 
Society. He has two girls, 9 and 7. 



Schwartz — He has two boys, 8 and 3 
years old. Fought the battle of Miami 
Beach as a member of the Air Force. 

Trupp — Practicing in Baltimore and 
said to be maintaining "two expensive 
women." 

Weinstein — Practicing in Orange, 
New Jersey. Has a boy 9 and a girl 
6 years old. 

We were fortunate in obtaining re- 
ports of many who did not show up: 

Andreorio — Lake Hopatcong, N. J. 

Brody— Capitol Heights, D. C. 

Brown — Stamford, Conn. Has two 
children. 

Carrill — Hagerstown, Md. Has two 
children. 

Decesare — Providence, R. I. 

Dionne — A trustee of the Massa- 
chusetts State Dental Society. Fall 
River. 

Evans — Going to school at Penn pre- 
paratory to professorship in new dental 
school at the University of North Caro- 
lina. Raising cattle near Chapel Hill. 

Fisher — When last heard of he was 
in the Veterans Administration hospital 
at Fort Howard undergoing surgery of 
the eye. 

Goldberg — Hartford, Conn. 

Hampson — Baltimore. Has a boy and 
girl. Sent regards from New York, 
where he was taking a course in peri- 
odontia. 

Hanik — Silver Spring, Maryland. 

Harris — No longer practicing den- 
tistry owing to an operation on the 
hand. Engaged in business in Cali- 
fornia. 

Hunter — Don has been stricken by 
poliomyelitis in the worst way. Unable 
to practice dentistry, he is confined to 
his home at 6 East Burke Avenue, Tow- 
son 4, Maryland. Let him process your 
magazine subscriptions and get your 
stationery for you. You'll find his serv- 
ice excellent. 

Impresa — Practicing oral surgery in 
Waterbury, Conn. 

Kreshtool — Engaged in orthodontics 
in Wilmington, Del. 

Milobsky — Washington, D. C. 

Mitten — Still in the Canal Zone. 

Meyers — Bridgeport, Conn. Has four 
children. 

Myers Westminster, Md. 

Shipman — Orthodontic practice in 
Worcester, Mass. Has three children. 

The occasion was graced with visits 
by Dr. J. Ben Robinson, who announced 
his impending retirement from the 
Deanship; by Dr. Harry B. McCarthy, 
who extended greetings from the 
School and its faculty; and by "Dutch" 
Fetter, operative instructor in our stu- 
dent days, now practicing in Elizabeth- 
town, Pennsylvania. 

A. J. Bendenbaugh '13 

Beginning with a member of the 
Class of 1847 the Baltimore dental 
schools have graduated 232 South 
Carolinians. Many of these men re- 
turned to their native state to render 
splendid services to their patients and 
to make noteworthy contributions to 
the progress of their profession. 

A good representative of this group 
of men who have brought much re- 
flected recognition to their alma mater 



[28] 



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is Andrew J. Bedenbaugh, of Columbia, 
a member of the University of Mary- 
land Class of 1913. Dr. Bedenbaugh 
came to dental school from Pomaria, 
S. C. following' his graduation from 
Newberry College. As an undergrad- 
uate, he was president of his class in 
the freshman year and a member of 
Xi Psi Phi. During thirty-eight years 
of practice Dr. Bedenbaugh has been 
a strong believer in the values to be 
derived from effective organizational 
effort. In 1927 he was elected president 
of the Columbia Dental Society. He is 
also a past president of the Central 
District Society. He reached the high 
point of his career in 1949 when he was 
elected president of the South Carolina 
Dental Society. Dr. Bedenbaugh has 
made a strong impress on dental prac- 
tice over a wide area through his num- 
erous clinics on amalgam technic which 
he has presented before many local 
district and state societies. 

Sympathy for Secretary 

Dr. John J. Partridge, a 1915 grad- 
uate of the Dental School, now living 
in Fall River, Massachusetts wrote 
recently to send his subscription to 
"MARYLAND" and to send the follow- 
ing quip concerning a secretary which 
he felt might have some implication 
as far as our Association is concerned. 
If you are a Secretary you will enjoy 
it!— 

"Will a Secretary go to Heaven?" 

"If a secretary writes a letter, it's too long. 
If he sends a postal, it's too short. If he doesn't 
send a notice, he's lazy. If he attends a com- 
mittee meeting, he's butting in. If he stays 
away, he's a shirker. If he duns a member for 
dues, he's insulting. If he fails to collect dues, 
he's slipping. If he asks for advice, he's in- 
competent. If he does not, he's bull-headed. If 
he writes reports complete, they're too long. If 
he condenses them, they're incomplete. If he 
talks on a subject, he's trying to run things. If 
he remains quiet, he's lost interest in the 
meetings. 

..Ashes to Ashes, Dust to Dust, If others won't 
do it, The Secretary must." 

Inman '15 Heads Maryland Dentists 

Dr. Conrad L. Inman, of Baltimore, a 
member of the Class of 1915 (B.C.D.S.), 
was elected to serve as president of the 
Maryland State Dental Association, 
1951-1952. Dr. Inman is the sixty- 
sixth president of the variously titled 
Maryland dental societies and is the 
fifty-ninth graduate of the dental 
schools of Baltimore to achieve election 
to the office. Like six of his predeces- 
sors, he came from North Carolina to 
study dentistry at the birthplace of 
formal dental education. 

Dr. Inman, who has specialized in 
the field of oral surgery since 1930, has 
for many years taught Anesthesiology 
at his alma mater. He is Chief of the 
Oral Surgery Departments at St. 
Joseph's Hospital, the Bon Secours 
Hospital, the South Baltimore General 
Hospital, and the Lutheran Hospital of 
Maryland. A Fellow of the American 
College of Dentists (1939), Dr. Inman 
also holds membership in the American 
Society of Oral Surgeons, the Balti- 
more City Dental Society, the Inter- 
national Anesthesia Research Society, 
Omicron Kappa Upsilon, Gorgas Odont- 
ological Society, and Psi Omega. 

A son, Conrad L. Inman, Jr., a mem- 
ber of the Class of 1944, has been asso- 
ciated with his father since his return 



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from service in the Navy. 

The jovial and rubicund "Connie" 
served as president of the National 
Alumni Association, 1949-1950. As the 
leader of Maryland's dentists, he has 
the good wishes and eager support of 
hundreds of friends among the alumni 
who have known him over the years as 
an effective teacher and as a loyal 
alumnus. 




••"»J|Y wife, Gloria Pasquella Tur- 
^Y II ner > an d I> Classes '48 and '47 
(A. & S.) respectively, have greatly en- 
joyed the publication, Maryland — a 
literary effort worthy of the acclaim 
directed to it and its staff," writes 
James H. Turner, 4823 Indian Lane, 
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many past associates as well as the 
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[29] 



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Ljlenn oL. I 1 'lit / tin i^olleae of 

ENGINEERING and 
AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 



By Robert K. Warner '47 



LIEUTENANT Colonel George O. 
Weber, University Business Man- 
ager (Eng. '33) on active duty in the 
Army has been assigned to the Korean 
Military Advisory Group and is con- 
structing a replacement training cen- 
ter with 20,000-man capacity. 

His address is: O-305670 MPC, APO- 
301 KMAG— RTC No. 2, c/o Post- 
master, San Francisco, California. 
Annual Meeting of Alumni 
By R. K. Warner 

The annual meeting of the Engineer- 
ing Alumni of the University of Mary- 
land convened on November 3, 1951. 
Presiding at the meeting was Col. 0. H. 
Saunders, '10, President of the En- 
gineering Alumni Board and recording 
the minutes was S. C. Ward, '32, 
Secretary-Treasurer for the Engineer- 
ing Alumni Board. 

Among those in attendance were the 
past presidents of the Engineering 
Alumni Board C. V. Koons, '29; F. H. 
Cutting, '34; T. J. Vandoren, '08 and 
J. P. Mudd, '07. 

Col. Saunders reviewed the functions 
and purposes of the various committees 
associated with the Board. 

C. V. Koons appealed for maximum 
support of Maryland, the Alumni 
Magazine. "College of Engineering," 
he said, "is leading in the percentage 
of alumni that subscribe." 

When you are asked to shed some 
light on yourself, or on other alumni 
with whom you are well acquainted, 
please do so and don't spare the pen 
and paper. This is one of the major 
functions of an alumni magazine and 
must be successful if the other features 
of the magazine are to have their full- 
est meaning. 

S. C. Ward, '32 summarized the 
results of the recent election by 
post-card of the Engineering Repre- 
sentatives to the Alumni Board of 
Directors. The following were elected: 
C. A. Warthen, '08 of 3219 17th St., 
N.E., Washington, D. C; E. S. Lank, 
'34 of 5021 Yorktown Rd., Greenacres, 
Md. and J. C. Forsythe, '48 of Sykes- 
ville, Md. 

The Engineering Alumni Board is 
now composed of the following men: 
Col. O. H. Saunders, '10 (Pres.), C. 
A. Warthen, '08 (Vice-Pres.), S. C. 
Ward. '32 (Sec'y-Treas.), F. H. Dry- 
den, '09, H. M. Biggs, '33, T. L. Cole- 
man, '33, A. B. Beveridge, '36, E. S. 
Lank, '34, and J. C. Forsythe, '48. 
Representatives to the General Alumni 
Council will be Col. Saunders, C. V. 
Koons, '29 and S. C. Ward. The officers 
of the Board and Representatives to 
the Council were determined at a short 
meeting at the close of the regularly 
scheduled alumni meeting. 



F. H. Cutting, '34, Chairman of the 
Job Placement Committee, then out- 
lined the following plan of the new 
Job Opportunity Service. The objec- 
tive of the service would be to help 
those who would like to change jobs 
because of lack of a future, etc. A 
post-card file system is proposed that 
would combine the efforts of the Dean's 
Office and the Alumni Office and would 
work somewhat as follows: A post- 
card with an explanatory letter will 
be sent to all Engineering Alumni. 
Those interested will fill out the card 
and return it immediately to the Dean's 
Office; otherwise they may choose to 
retain the card for future use when 
the time is more propitious. These 
cards will remain in the Dean's Office 
for approximately one year after which 
time, if the alumnus does not choose 
to renew his status in the file system, 
it will be returned to the Alumni Office. 
In connection with this plan, Dean S. 
S. Steinberg announced that he had 
many requests for all types of en- 
gineers with salary openings up to 
$15,000 per year so that you an see 
that this Job Opportunity Service has 
something with which to back up its 
program and thus promises to be a 
truly important service to the alumni. 

Dean S. S. Steinberg's Address 
Dean S. S. Steinberg of the Glenn L. 
Martin College of Engineering and 
Aeronautical Sciences addressed the 
group and summarized some recent 
events and future plans for the stu- 
dents, faculty and the physical plant. 
In discussing the enrollment in the 
College, he pointed out that it had 
dropped from last year's 1,000 to the 
present 850 and compared these figures 
to the high of 1,650 attained a few 
years after V-J Day. He said that the 
largest graduating class in the Col- 
lege's history was in 1949 and totalled 
280; in 1950, there were about 250 
graduates, and he expects about 240 
will graduate in 1952. It was at this 
point that he expressed his regret 
at not being able to know by name 
each graduating senior as he used to 
but that such was the price of progress. 
He announced that the faculty of the 
Engineering College had been main- 
tained intact and that President H. C. 
Byrd plans to ask the State Legis- 
lature for a 20^ raise for all faculty 
members. As regards the physical 
plant of the College, he noted that four 
new buildings, representing an invest- 
ment of $5,000,000, have been occupied 
for two years and that the new Chem- 
istry Building, though not quite com- 
plete, is already occupied. He an- 
nounced that plans now include a new 



[30] 



Physics Building, already under con- 
struction, which will also house the 
Institute of Fluid Dynamics and Ap- 
plied Mathematics, and an engineering 
administration building which will in- 
clude the Mathematics Department and 
a library for engineering and the 
sciences. The Dean also announced 
plans to conduct evening graduate 
courses in Baltimore and that a bud- 
get request for $826,000 will be made 
to equip and provide a separate fac- 
ulty for this service. Everyone was 
most favorably impressed with the 
picture Dean Steinberg painted and 
rightly so. The College has made re- 
markable progress in recent years. 

The meeting was adjourned im- 
mediately following the Dean's address 
and many went to the luncheon pro- 
vided for all alumni in the new Cafete- 
ria. The alumni meeting was most 
successful and informative as was the 
remainder of the day as Maryland's 
football team remained undefeated by 
taking the Missouri football team 
through complete, unabridged under- 
graduate and graduate courses in foot- 
ball by a score of 35-0. 

Follow-Up on Antique Tools 

The preceding issue of the Alumni 
Magazine told of a collection of rare, 
old carpenter tools received by the 
College of Engineering through the 
generosity of Mrs. Ethel F. Shannon. 
In that issue it was revealed that plans 
were being made to have suitable dis- 
play cabinets made for the tools and 
to put them in a prominent place for 
display. We are now happy to an- 
nounce that a contract for the con- 
struction of these cabinets has been 
let and that delivery of them is ex- 
pected in the late Spring of 1952. The 
cabinets will be of wood with glass 
fronts and sides and will be displayed 
on the main floor of the principal en- 
gineering building. This set of tools, 
it is believed, is unique in this area 
and will be of great interest to all. 

Prof. R. B. Allen 

Professor R. B. Allen of the Civil 
Engineering Department was recently 
appointed to serve a five year term as 
Chairman of the Standards and Ap- 
peals Board for the administration of 
the new building code in Prince Georges 
County. The appointment was made 
by the Maryland National Park and 
Planning Commission and took effect 
on October 29, 1951. Professor Allen 
recently took a trip to Boulder, Golden 
and Denver, Colorado as a national 
officer of Tau Beta Pi, the Engineering 
honorary fraternity. He is the Alumni 
Representative for over 60,000 alumni 
in this fraternity. He was also recently 
nominated to run for Treasurer of the 
National Society of Professional En- 
gineers. The election takes place in 
January and if elected it will be his 
fifth consecutive term in that office. He 
attended an Executive Committee and 
Board of Directors Meeting for this 
Society in Kansas city on November 
8, 9 and 10. 



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On D. C. Panel 

On November 10, 1951 the District 
of Columbia Conference on Industrial 
Safety met in the District Building- 
Dean Steinberg of the College of En- 
gineering served with six others on a 
panel that discussed "The Problems of 
Reducing Industrial Accidents in The 
District of Columbia." This meeting 
was an outgrowth of President Tru- 
man's Conferencce on Industrial Safety 
of which Dean Steinberg is Chairman 
of the Committee on Education. 
Weekly Seminars 

The Institute for Fluid Dynamics and 
Applied Mathematics is sponsoring 
weekly seminars, to continue for the 
remainder of the semester, on Mondays, 
Wednesdays and Fridays. 
Wind Tunnel 

Officials at the Glenn L. Martin Col- 
lege of Engineering and Aeronautical 
Sciences expect to complete a new and 
vastly improved wind tunnel before 
January. 

Cicero E. McAllister, superintendent 
of the aeronautical lab, cited one of 
the best features of the near-complete 
structure as being the increase operat- 
ing time. 

The tunnel currently in use operates 
for only one second but the new one 
will maintain a supersonic wind for 
about twelve seconds. 

Designed largely by Professor A. 
Wiley Sherwood, the new tunnel will 
have a six-inch-square test section. 

Plans for the new equipment were 
begun about five months ago. It is 
being constructed in a large measure 
out of surplus material, with student 
help. The tunnel will cost several 
thousand dollars less than if it had 
been constructed from entirely new 
pai'ts. 

The only part of the tunnel which is 
being manufactured for the project is 
the actual test section. 

When complete, the apparatus will 
be used for classroom demonstrations 
as well as for research programs. 

This tunnel which replaces a cap- 
tured Japanese tunnel obtained by the 
University from the Air Force, will be 
located in the Aeronautical section of 
the engineering lab building. 

The operation of the tunnel will be 
similar to the one now in operation at 
the Naval Ordnance Laboratory at 
White Oaks, Maryland, only on a 
smaller scale. 

Air is pumped from a large chamber 
connected to the tunnel. A quick- 
opening valve opens, permitting air to 
enter the chamber passing through a 
drying compartment and the test sec- 
tion. 

The purpose of the supersonic tunnel 
is to examine shock waves caused when 
air passes a model aircraft mounted 
inside the test chamber. 

Flight Pioneer Speaks 

Mr. Grover Loening, internationally 
famous aviation engineering authority 
and pioneer builder of land and sea 
planes, addressed freshmen engineering 
students. 

Mr. Loening is making a survey for 
the National Advisory Committee for 
Aeronautics for the purpose of stimu- 



lating further interest and activity in 
aviation. 

From 1918 to 1936 (less one year 
spent with Curtiss-Wright) Mr. Loen- 
ing headed his own aviation company. 
He has been active in flight promotion 
and construction since the days of 
aviation's infancy when he was assist- 
ant engineer to Orville Wright. 

During his visit to College Park Mr. 
Loening inspected the University's 
wind tunnel, in charge of Professor A. 
Wiley Sherwood. 

Accident Panel 

Dean S. S. Steinberg took part in a 
panel discussion on the problem of 
reducing industrial accidents in Wash- 
ington, D.C. Conference on Industrial 
Safety. 

Dr. Eva Windier 

For the Institute for Fluid Dynamics 
end Applied Mathematics Dr. Eva 
Windier of the Naval Ordnance Lab- 
oratory spoke on "Use of X-Rays to 
Measure Low Density Flows." 



DAD'S DAY 

"Dad's Day" was observed at College 
Park on 17 November 1951. Dr. Byrd 
addressed the assembled Dads. 

There followed the parade of Home- 
coming Floats postponed from the 
Homecoming due to inclement weather; 
Dad's lunch, dining hall ; presentation 
of High School Bands at the Stadium; 
football, Maryland vs. North Carolina 
State; presentation of High School 
Band Winner; awards for float and 
house decorations; "A Salute to Our 
Dads" by the University of Maryland 
Band. 

After the game, coffee and doughnuts 
were sei-ved in the Recreation Hall. 
A Dad's Day dinner in the Dining Hall 
and the Rossborough Dance at the 
Armory were held in honor of Dads. 






■'.-* 




ALUMNAE TOPIC 

Griselda:- "Remember those discussions we 
used to have on "Heredity vs. Environment," 
during which Anastasia always insisted heredi- 
ty was the controlling factor in child behavior?" 
Guinevere :-"I)oesn't she still believe that?" 
Grissy:-"No, now she's in doubt because her 
son acts sort of goofy. Now she leans toward 
environment and sez the boy chums around too 
much with his daddy." 



[32] 



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COACH < 

Jim latum. pi< 
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Sportswriters' Asm 
the honor. The Tew 
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Marvin Bass. \V&Y« 
Duke, and Tom Ron 
third. 

"What differ** 
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MARYLAND 35 
MISSOURI 



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• NAVY 21 



MARYLAND 53 • MARYLAND 54 
N. C STATE • W. VIRGINIA 8 



• TOTAL 

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all the way to Cumberland only to 
learn that the boy he sought had al- 
ready elected to attend University of 
Maryland. 

Readers wonder whether or not the 
Judge appreciated the fact that Cum- 
berland happens to be in Maryland. 
"Don't Sell Sports Short!" 

In this uncalled for rhubarb, the 
sensible, feet-on-the-ground attitude of 
Maryland's President was in keeping' 
with what Marylanders have long- 
learned to expect from him. 

In an address at a University of 
Pennsylvania banquet in honor of 
Penn's football team, Dr. Byrd said: 

"The fact is that a few men have let 
the game down, and as a result the 
sport as a whole has suffered. ■ 

"It is my job and the job of others 
who hold positions such as mine to 
weed out these undesirable persons 
who have brought a bad name to 
sports," he said. 

"Blame can be laid on what may be 
termed the human factor," Dr. Byrd 
continued. "If we can eliminate the few 
persons who have put athletics in a bad 
light we will have done a great job to- 
ward keeping alive the great American 
spirit of competition. 

"Nowhere else in the world are com- 
petitive athletics used to such good as 
it is in this country. Athletics present 
one of the greatest means we have of 
building character in the Nation's fu- 
ture leaders. Don't sell sports short." 
No Place For Hypocrisy 

Dr. Byrd said he saw nothing wrong 
with extending financial aid to college 
athletes. 

Scholarships and other help go to 
those deserving of it and if they meet 
requirements there is no reason why 
they should not get help, he declared. 

"But for any school leader to say 
his athletes are not getting as much as 
the ones at some other school is sheer 
hypocrisy and an utterly foolish thing 
to do," said Dr. Byrd. 

Some coaches use the "aid-to-ath- 
letes" cry to cover up their own losing 
seasons, he said. "They accuse other 
schools of paying their players more 
than they could get elsewhere. 

"Loose tongues are doing more harm 
to college athletics than they realize," 
said Dr. Byrd, "and they should learn 
to say only what they can prove." 
The "Makings" of a Team 

Maryland did not skyrocket to the 
top rung it now occupies in the national 
football spotlight. That position is the 
result of intelligent recruitment of tal- 
ent which not only can play football 
but can also pass the tests and exams 
needed for graduation. It is the result 
of hard work and incessant application 
on the part of members of the athletic 
department under the organizational 
ability and excellent leadership of the 
Director of Athletics. 

When, with the needed groundwork 
and background, athletic talent is 
coached into a well balanced aggrega- 
tion that features teamwork, morale 
and a great will to win, those respon- 
sible for it, from the University's 
President down to the youngest assist- 
ant trainer, should well be accorded 



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full meed of credit for having developed 
a unit possessing the generally lecog- 
nized but indefinable something com- 
monly called "class." 

Here is simply a case of brilliant 
development under the experienced ad- 
ministration of a President who appre- 
ciates the objective values of athletics. 

Far more important than the criti- 
cisms was the comment of backfield 
star Ed Modzelewski who, in the nat- 
ural jubilation over an undefeated 
season, exclaimed "My biggest thrill 
will come next June when I graduate 
from the finest college in America." 
Board of Regents' Report 

A report of the Board of Regents, 
in answer to a request from Governor 
Theodore R. McKeldin for their "opin- 
ion" on the conduct of university ath- 
letics placed a stamp of approval upon 
the program. 

Governor McKeldin forwarded his 
request to Judge William P. Cole, Jr., 
regents board chairman, the day after 
the New York judge made his uncalled 
for allusions to Maryland. 

The report answered specific ques- 
tions, viz: — 

1. Maryland is functioning well with- 
in the present system of recruiting as 
approved by the Southern conference. 

2. The football squad is almost an 
exact cross section of the student body 
in reference to academic standing. 

3. The academic requirements for 
athletes are exactly the same as those 
for other students. 

No Dishonor 

4. No athlete is permitted to receive 
from any source whatsoever financial 
aid beyond his actual university ex- 
penses. 

5. The school's athletic program does 
not detract in any manner from the 
academic work of the university. 

6. There is nothing in the athletic 
program at Maryland which is, in any 
sense, based on deceit, and there is 
nothing in it that could possibly bring 
dishonor on the school. 

7. The university adheres strictly to 
the rules and regulations of the South- 
ern conference. 

8. Maryland never engages in any 
type of effort that might bring dis- 
honor on the school. The regents would 
never permit double standards in which 
there are one set of academic stand- 
ings for athletes and another for non- 
athletes. 

Highlights of the report on athletics 
made by the University of Maryland 
Board of Regents to Governor Mc- 
Keldin: 

"The University of Maryland this 
year has one of the most outstanding 
football teams in the country. This 
team is the result of a combination of 
good coaching, effective organization 
and administration of the athletic 
program, excellent facilities and good 
players; it is in no sense the result of 
any kind of deceit or dishonesty. 

"The football squad is almost an 
exact cross-section of the student body 
as a whole. Only three out of the first 
33 men are below average standing. 

"The board of regents would never 
permit double standards in the Uni- 



versity of Maryland in which one set 
of academic standaids exists for the 
athlete and one for the nonathlete, nor 
in any other particular would it con- 
ceal any of its activities in athletics. 
President Byrd:- 
"There are approximately 800 stu- 
dents receiving help to go through the 
University of Maryland. Approximately 
84 of these are football players. . . . 
Athletes, in their academic work, are 
held to the same standards as other 
students. Anything else would be un- 
thinkable. . . . 

"Twenty-three members of Mary- 
land's football squad are majoring in 
physical education, but that the College 
of Physical Education and Health is 
more than a scholastic refuge for foot- 
ball players is shown by the fact that 
428 students, girls and boys, are major- 
ing in this college, all doing so because 
they are interested in that type of work 
and all believe that upon graduation a 
good livelihood awaits them in that 
field. . . . 

"All athletes take the Basic and many 
the Advanced Reserve Officers Training 
Corps work of the Air Force. Ed 
Modzelewski, the university's outstand- 
ing fullback, will immediately upon 
graduation become a commissioned 
officer in the Air Force." — Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, university president. 
Dean Cotterman:- 
"The scholarship committee would 
be guilty of hypocrisy if it claimed that 
it does not give consideration to the 
fact that a boy may be a good half- 
back or a good baseball pitcher, but it 
does make sure that in all other 
respects an athlete must measure up 
equally as well, or better than, other 
applicants." — Dr. Harold F. Cotterman, 
chairman of the faculty committee of 
scholarships. 

Registrar Preinkert:- 
"The authorities in charge of ath- 
letics have never shown any disposition 
to violate our academic standards 
and regulations." — Alma H. Preinkert, 
registrar. 

Coach Tatum:- 
"No help of any kind is granted to 
athletes in the University of Maryland 
above natural university expenses. The 
president of the university instructed 
all coaches that nothing beyond this 
would be permitted under penalty of 
dismissal. We know the university 
standards, we know the conference 
rules and we are are mighty careful 
not to violate any of them." — Jim 
Tatum, director of athletics and head 
football coach. 



THE SUGAR BOWL 

MANY WHO saw Coach Jim 
Tatum's talented brigade "do 
what they wanted to" against such 
stubborn and courageous opposition as 
that afforded by North Carolina State 
and West Virginia, or against the val- 
iant all-out efforts of such great outfits 
as L. S. U., Navy, and Missouri and, 
particularly, the team work that routed 
the season's toughest opposition and 



[38] 



took a lot of the spirit right out of 
North Carolina, are of the opinion that 
the Terrapins are the best ball team in 
the country and that they do not de- 
serve to be rated under Tennessee, 
Michigan State or any other aggregation 
any more than they deserve to be 
sniped at by distant critics. 

If Tennessee has a day such as saw 
Vanderbilt's Billy Wade set the Vols 
on their heels to barely win, 35-27, and 
Maryland unpeels a game like the 
Terp's job against N. C. S. the sugar 
from the Crescent City's famed sac- 
charine container is going to be loaded 
on the buckboard labeled "To College 
Park." 

Here are the comparative records of 
undefeated Tennessee and Maryland, 
opponents in the coming New Year's 
Day classic, viz: — 

MARYLAND 

Won 9, Lost 

Washington & Lee 54 — 14 

George Washington 33 — 6 

Georgia 43 — 7 

North Carolina 14 — 7 

L. S. U 27— 

Missouri 35 — 

Navy 40—21 

N. C. State 53— 

West Virginia 54 — 7 

Totals 353—62 

TENNESSEE 
Won 10, Lost 

Mississippi State 14 — 

Duke 26— 

Chattanooga 42—13 

Alabama 27—13 

Tennessee Tech 68— 

North Carolina 27— 

Washington & Lee 60 — 14 

Mississippi 46 — 21 

Kentucky 28— 

Vanderbilt 35—27 

Totals 373—88 

Started in '34 

Organized in 1934 as a voluntary 
non-profit civic organization, the New 
Orleans Mid-Winter Sports Association 
was conceived for the purpose of ad- 
vancing the cause of collegiate athletics 
in the Deep South and to promote 
friendship with people of other sec- 
tions. 

Today with a stadium seating 82,289, 
sold out months before the participat- 
ing teams are selected, the Sugar Bowl 
enjoys the national rating as the No. 
1 post-season spectacle. 

How the Sugar Bowl reached the 
heights in such a comparatively short 
span is one of the most amazing 
success stories in American athletic 
history. 

Time was when folks said Southern- 
ers were too lazy to get out of the noon 
day sun, and New Orleans was just a 
fun loving city whose citizens did not 
realize the attractiveness of its old 
world charm and hospitality. And had 
failed to capitalize on its unusual 
sports tradition. 

That was before 39 New Orleanians 
formed the Mid-Winter Sports Associa- 
tion, and started the development of 
the Sugar Bowl classic. 



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THIS IS IT 

The Sugar Bowl at New Orleans. Insert at the right shows the Sugar Bowl Trophy. The Sugar 
Bowl is the largest double decked steel stadium in the world. It seats 82.289. Built on the site of the 
Etienne deBore plantation where sugar was first granulated, the Sugar Bowl comes by the title nat- 
urally. Tulane University laid out the first football gridiron on this spot more than 25 years ago with 
a concrete stadium seating 2500. In 1934 when the Adiminstrators granted permission for the sta- 
dium's use for a New Year's day classic it had a capacity of 24,000. It was enlarged to 69,000 for 
the 1940 classic. 



SUGAR BOWL SCORES 



Year 

'35 
'36 
'37 
'38 
'39 
'40 
'41 
'42 
'43 
'44 
'45 
'46 
'47 
'48 
'49 
'50 



Team Coach Points 

Tulane (Ted Cox) 20 

Texas Christian (Leo Meyer) 3 

Santa Clara (Lawrence Shaw) 21 

Santa Clara (Lawrence Shaw) 6 

Texas Christian (Leo Meyer) 15 

Texas A. & M. (Homer Norton) 14 

Boston College (Frank Leahy) 19 

Fordham (Jim Crowley) 2 

Tennessee (John Barnhill) 14 

Ga. Tech (William Alexander) 20 

Duke (Eddie Cameron) 29 

Oklahoma A. & M. (Jim Lookabaugh) 33 

Georgia (Wally Butts) 20 

Texas (J. Blair Cherry) 27 

Oklahoma (Bud Wilkinson) 14 

Kentucky (Bear Bryant) 13 



Team Coach Points 

Temple (Glenn Warner) 14 

L. S. U. (Bernie Moore) 2 

L. S. U. (Bernie Moore) 14 

L. S. U. (Bernie Moore) 

Carnegie Tech (Bill Kern) 7 

Tulane (Lowell Dawson) 13 

Tennessee (Bob Neyland) 13 

Missouri (Don Faurot) 

Tulsa (Henry Frnka) 7 

Tulsa ( Henry Frnka) 18 

Alabama (Frank Thomas) 26 

St. Mary's (Jim Phelan) 13 

North Carolina (Carl Snavely) 10 

Alabama (Harold Drew) 7 

North Carolina (Carl Snavely) 6 

Oklahoma (Bud Wilkinson) 7 



The idea of a New Year's day foot- 
ball classic in New Orleans was first 
presented in 1927 by Col. James M. 
Thomson, then publisher of The New 
Orleans Item. 

Reception of the proposal was cool. 
It was even scoffed at in some quarters. 
But Fred Digby, through The Item's 
sports columns, continually urged cit- 
izens to organize. He visualized the 
possibilities; what it meant to New 
Orleans and the Deep South to have 
such a sports spectacle. 

As the years rolled by Digby en- 
larged on the plan, and outlined a mid- 
winter carnival and even gave the still 
dream game its name, "Sugar Bowl." 

1952 Schedule 

With the close of the '51 season, and 
Terrapins in the sugar bowl it is quite 
natural for alumni to be asking, as they 
are, "What gives for next year?" Taste 
of success and the top and the desire 
is for big league fare. Well, long before 
that wish expressed itself it was neces- 
sary for Coach Tatum to make the 
1952 schedule: Alabama, LSU, Navy, 
North Carolina,, G. W. and W. & L. in 

[40] 



Byrd 


Stadium. Not bad fare, wot ? 


Here's 


the sked:- 


Sept 


20 — Missouri 


Sept 


27 — George Washington 


*Oct. 


4 — Washington and Lee 


Oct. 


11 — Georgia 


Oct. 


18— Navy 


Oct. 


25 — Louisiana State 


Nov. 


1 — South Carolina 


Nov. 


8 — West Virginia 


*Nov. 


15 — North Carolina 


*Nov. 


22 — Alabama 


Nov. 


29— North Carolina State 



*At College Park 



SELECTIONS 

AP's All-South 

FIRST TEAM 

Ends — Harry Babcock, (ieorgia and Ben Rod- 
erick, Vanderbilt. 

Tackles — Lamar Wheat, Georgia Tech and 
Bill Pearman, Tennessee. 

Guards— BOB WARD, MARYLAND, and Ten* 
Daffcr. Tennessee. 

Center — Doug Mosley, Kentucky. 

Quarter — Vito Parilli, Kentucky. 

Halfs — Steve Wadiak, South Carolina and 
Hank Lauricella, Tennessee. 

Full— ED MODZELEWSKI, MARYLAND 



I.N.S. All America 

OFFENSE Pos. 

McColl, Stanford E. 

Faverty, Wisconsin E. 

Coleman, Mich. State T. 

Ulrich, Illinois T. 

Mrkonic, Kansas G. 

Richter, California G. 

Hightower, S.M.U C. 

Matson, San Francisco B. 

Kazmaier, Princeton B. 

Lauricella, Tennessee B. 

MODZELEWSKI, MARYLAND B. 

DEFENSE Pos. 

Bell, Pennsylvania E. 

McPhee, Princeton E. 

Wheat, Georgia Tech T. 

Weatherall, Oklahoma T. 

Daffer, Tennessee G. 

WARD, MARYLAND G. 

Cannamela, So. California C. 

Isbell. Baylor B. 

Parilli, Kentucky B. 

Kerkorian, Stanford B. 

Dorow, Mich. State B. 



Collier's Football Coaches 
All-Southern Conference 

OFFENSE 

Ends — Robert Thomas, Washington and Lee, 
and Jack Lewis, Wake Forest. 

Tackles — Bill George, Wake Forest, and James 
Lawrence, Duke. 

Guards— ROBERT WARD, MARYLAND, and 
Sam Lupo, William and Mary. 

Center — Ted Filer, William and Mary. 

Backs — Gil Bocetti, Washington and Lee; Billy 
Hair, Clemson ; Steve Wadiak, South Carolina, 
and ED MODZELEWSKI, MARYLAND. 

DEFENSE 

Ends — James Gibson, Duke, and George Norris, 
North Carolina. 

Tackles — Elmer Costa, North Carolina State, 
and DICK MODZELEWSKI, MARYLAND. 

Guards— ROBERT WARD, MARYLAND, and 
Joseph Dudeck, North Carolina. 

Linebackers— DAVE CIANELLI, MARY- 
LAND, and Harrv Jabbusch, South Carolina. 

Halfbacks— JOSEPH PETRUZZO, MARY- 
LAND, and Robert Bickel, Duke. 

Safety — Dickie Davis, Wake Forest. 



Collier's Coaches All-South 

SOUTH 

Pos. Player Team 

E. Vince Kaseta Tennessee 

E. Buck Martin Georgia Tech 

T. Marion Campbell Georgia 

T. Jerome Helluin Tulane 

G. BOB WARD MARYLAND 

G. Ray Beck Georgia Tech 

C. Doug Moseley Kentucky 

Q. Vito Parilli Kentucky 

H. Hank Lauricella Tennessee 

H. Steve Wadiak South Carolina 

F. ED MODZELEWSKI MARYLAND 



Grantland Rice, "Look" and 
Football Writers All- America 

OFFENSE 

Pos. Player Team 

E. Williams Baylor 

T. Coleman Mich. State 

G. Liotta Villanova 

C. Moseley Kentucky 

G. Beck Georgia Tech 

T. Little Tex. A. & M. 

E. McColl Stanford 

B. Isbell Baylor 

B. Lauricella Tennessee 

B. Karras Illinois 

B. Kazmaier Princeton 

DEFENSE 
Pos. Player Team 

E. McPhee Princeton 

T. Pearman Tennessee 

G. Millett Holy Cross 

G. WARD MARYLAND 

T. Weatherall Oklahoma 

E. O'Donahue Wisconsin 

BU Cannamela U. S. C. 

BU Richter California 

HB Matson San Fran. 

HB Dillon Texas 

Sfty Brosky Illinois 



Player of the Year 

Bob Ward, Maryland's All-America 
guard, is the Southern Conference 
player of the year. The selection was 
made by the Southern Conference 



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"IN 59 YEARS WE'LL BE IN THE SUGAR BOWL!" 



1. Kimer 

2. Weimer 

3. (Unidentified) 

4. Harding 



5. Harrison, J. R. 9. Sherman 13. Strickler 

6. Crapster 10. Push 14. Mitchell 

7. Keys 11. Harrison (Prof.) 15. Wharton 

8. Bannon 12. Compton 16. Wooters 

17. Rollins 



The Terps of 1893, pictured above, wore pearl and maroon, the first school colors. This photo- 
graph comes to these pages from Quarterback Clifton E. Fuller, of Cumberland, campus visitor 
at 1951 Homecoming. 



Sports Writers' Association and Ward 
will receive a ti-ophy emblematic of the 
honor at the Washington, D. C. Touch- 
down Club's annual football banquet. 

Another Marylander, Fullback Ed 
Modzelewski, the team's leading scorer 
and also a powerful blocker, was third 
with 41 points. 

Among others who received mention 
were Dick Modzelewski and Halfback 
Jack Scarbath. 



AP All-America 

OFFENSE 

E. McColl Stanford 

E. Carey Mich. State 

T. Toneff Notre Dame 

T. Coleman Mich. State 

G. WARD MARYLAND 

G. Matuszak Tulsa 

C. Mosley Kentucky 

B. Kazmaier Princeton 

B. Lauricella Tennessee 

B. McElhennv Washington 

B. Isbell Baylor 

DEFENSE 

E. O'Donahue Wisconsin 

E. McConnell Wyoming 

T. Weatherall Oklahoma 

T. Pearman Tennessee 

G. Beck Georgia Tech 

G. Palumbo Virginia 

LB. Flowers T.C.U. 

LB. Richter Calif. 

B. Dillon Texas 

B Brosky Illinois 

B. Matson S.F.U. 

AP. All-America 
Second team, offense:- Ed Modzelewski. 
Offense-: Dick Modzelewski. 

AP Honorable Mention :- 
Tom Cosgrove. Jack Scarbath, Dave Cianelli. 
Joe Petruzzo. 

Collier's Football Writers' 
All-America 

E. Howton Rice 

E. McColl Stanford 

T. Coleman Mich. State 

T. Weatherall Oklahoma 

G. WARD MARYLAND 

G. Beck Georgia Tech 

C. Hightower S.M.U. 

B. Lauricella 1 ennessee 

B. Kazmaier Princeton 

B. Karras Illinois 

B. Gifford So. Calif. 

[42] 



Players' All-America 

(Selected by Opponents) 
OFFENSE 

E. McColl Stanford 

E. Howton Rice 

T. Coleman Mich. St. 

T. George Wake Forest 

G. Richter California 

G. WARD MARYLAND 

C. Hightower S.M.U. 

B. Parilli Kentucky 

B. Kazmaier Princeton 

B. Lauricella Tennessee 

B. McElhenny Washington 

DEFENSE 

E. Sugar Purdue 

E. Atkins Tennessee 

T. MODZELEWSKI MARYLAND 

T. Johnson Mich. 

G. Beck Georgia Tech 

LB. Richter California 

LB. Flowers Texas Ch. 

LB. Liotta Villanova 

B. Dillon Texas 

B. Ellis Mich. St. 

B. Stone Syracuse 

Three Terps in Senior Bowl 

Three members of Maryland's unde- 
feated Terps, the nation's third ranking 
team, accepted bids to play in the Sen- 
ior Bowl at Mobile, Alabama, on Jan- 
uary 5. 

They are Bob Ward, 185-pound All- 
American guard; Halfback Bob (Shoo 
Shoo) Shemonski, and Fullback Ed 
(Mighty Mo) Modzelewski. Their ac- 
ceptance to play with Coach Paul 
Brown's North team, means they'll op- 
pose four key Tennessee men twice in 
the same week. 

Tennessee's Hank Lauricella, Gordon 
Polofsgy, Ted Daffer and Bill Pearman 
already had accepted invitations to play 
with the South. 



************* 
H. D. THOREAU:— 

"How can we expect a harvest of 
tiiought who have >iot had a seed-time 
oj character?" 



Arch Ward's Chicago Tribune 

Washington Times-Herald 

All-South 

OFFENSE 

E. Babcock Georgia 

E. Thomas Washington Lee 

T. Werckle Vandei hilt 

T. George Wake Forest 

G. WARD MARYLAND 

G. Michaels Tennessee 

C. Moseley Kentucky 

B. Parilli Kentucky 

B. Crawford Georgia Tech 

B. Lauricella Tennessee 

B. MODZELEWSKI, ED MARYLAND 

DEFENSE 

E. Lutz Alabama 

E. Atkins Tennessee 

T. MODZELEWSKI, DICK MARYLAND 

T. Pearman Tennessee 

G. Beck Georgia Tech 

LB. Moseley Kentucky 

LB. Fortunato Mississippi State 

LB. Polofsky Tennessee 

B. Dooley Miami, Fla. 

B. Rechichar Tennessee 

B. Jim Lasane Virginia 

Honorable Mention:- Cosgrove, Baylor. 

Remember The Haruspices? 

Before each football season certain 
of the gentlemen of the Fourth Estate, 
(Section "Sports") make it policy to 
sort of oontz out upon a limb, many 
dragging their saws behind them, to 
predict just where various football 
teams will finish. 

Just for the heck of it lets take a 
peek in retrospect and see how close 
some of the better known prognosti- 
cators came to scoring with such a long- 
forward pass. 

Fred Russell, Satevepost picked 'em 
to finish: — 

1. Ohio State; 2. Tennessee; 3. Okla- 
homa; 4. California; 5. Notre Dame; 
6. Maryland; 7. Alabama; 8. Washing- 
ton; 9. Illinois; 10. Michigan State; 
11. Baylor 12. Kentucky; 13. Texas A. 
& M.; 14. Pennsylvania; 15. Miami; 
16. Texas; 17. Michigan; 18. Nebraska; 
19. Tulsa; 20. Wyoming. 

Mr. Russell also picked Maryland to 
top the Southern Conference. 

The A. P. poll predicted Maryland 
would wind up No. 16: — 

1. Tennessee; 2. Michigan State; 3. 
Ohio State; 4. Oklahoma; 5. California; 
6. Texas A&M; 7. Kentucky; 8. Wash- 
ington; 9. Alabama; 10. Illinois. 

Second Ten: 11. Texas; 12. Nebraska; 
13. Baylor; 14. Notre Dame; 15. Wis- 
consin; 16. Maryland; 17. Michigan; 
18, Princeton; 19. Penn.; 20. Cornell. 

Francis Wallace, in Colliers, figured 
Maryland to win eight of its nine 
games, rate No. 12 at the finish of the 
season and that the Terps would rule 
the Southern Conference. He also had 
Jim Tatum as the No. 1 candidate for 
the loop's coach of the year. 

Grantland Rice, topline sports writer 
for over 40 years, saw the Terps wind- 
ing up in 20th place, two spots back of 
North Carolina, his choice for the 
Southern Conference crown. 



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[43] 



Grid Results 




Maryland, 14; North Carolina, 7 

ARYLAND'S football 
team, prior to the 
Terps' 14 to 7 win 
over North Carolina, 
was rated No. 7, na- 
tionally. After the 
game the national rat- 
ings, with unbeaten 
California and Texas absorbing defeats, 
showed the Tatumterps listed as No. 5. 
The Snavely-tutored Tarheels were 
hot as a pistol for this one and totally 
refuted the haruspices who had the 
Terps tabbed to win by from 3 to 4 
touchdowns. 

It would have been much smarter 
for folks who like to inch out onto 
the limb to have listened to Jim Tatum. 
He knows North Carolina. He pre- 
dicted the bang-up tit-tat-toe battle 
the brilliant spectacle turned out to be. 
From the stands during and after 
the game, came criticisms emanating 
from the Downtown Coaches Associa- 
tion, ranging all the way from, "The 
better team lost the ball game," to 
"Tatum played it too close to his vest, 
kicking on third down. The score could 
have been run up against the Tar- 
heels." 



John Greenleaf Whittier, in Maud 
Midler, penned, 

For all sad words of tongue or pen, 

the saddest are these: 'It MIGHT 
have been."' 

Neither football games nor any other 
events are ever won by "Might have 
beens," "ifs." "ands" and/or "buts." 
Sports have been paying off on so-called 
lucky punches for, lo, these many, 
many years. 

North Carolina bi - ought up a team 
moraled, keyed up and loaded for bear. 
Fact is they were loaded right and 
had estimated correctly the type of big 
game they were hunting. 

In Maryland they met a team which 
was also keyed up and desperately bent 
on winning this as one of the "big 
ones." 

The better team won. 

While the Tarheels played most of 
the second half in Terp territory the 
fact is the better team in that area was 
the defensive team which gave them the 
old "so far and no further," akin to 
World War I Verdun's famous, "They 
shall not pass!" Football consists of 
offense and defense. 

North Carolina's Gantt, with 65 sec- 
onds to go, caught what appeared to 
be a sure score pass from Williams, 
i.e. sure score except that Maryland's 



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Petruzzo tackled him so timely and 
correctly that the Tarheel hopes 
bounced to the turf along with the 
ball. 

Another "it might have been" oc- 
curred in the final quarter when Mary- 
land's Faloney intercepted a good look- 
ing scoring pass on the Terps' 10-yard 
line and another when Tarheel Wallace 
was nailed on a fourth down pass. 

Carolina's good looking passes were 
knocked over by Maryland defensive 
stars Petruzzo, Faloney, et al, not be- 
cause these Terps "just happened to 
be there" but because the better team 
play HAD put them there. Also when 
Maryland's Alderton smeared two Tar- 
heel goalward marches by tossing Caro- 
lina's speedy Williams for 11 and 13- 
yard losses, that wasn't because, just 
by luck, he happened to be there. 

Neither was this one luck or "the 
breaks": - Carolina's Lackey inter- 
cepted a pass from Maryland's Scar- 
bath. That wasn't luck. That's what 
Lackey was there for, on the alert and 
ready to ramble. In the meantime, on 
the opposite side of the field, Ed Mod- 
zelewski, 210 pounds of aggressiveness, 
blessed with the speed that does not 
usually come to big fellows, cut di- 
agonally across the field, got by the 
perfect three-man interference protect- 
ing Lackey's goalward run, and tackled 
the ball carrier. Big Mo had to come 
half again as far as Lackey was rolling 
with a perfect start. That's not luck or 
the breaks. That's Modzelewski and a 
ball Club! 

The Terps took the opening kick off 
for 79 yards and a touchdown accom- 
plished by plays through the line, long 
and short passes, the last of which saw 
Maryland's Felton do a serpentine 
through a host of tackle-bent Tarheels. 
Prior to that Scarbath, Lindsay and 
Shemonski, by brilliant play, had 
worked the oval down field. 

Shortly thereafter the Carolina team, 
a great aggregation, geared for a 
rough and bruising battle, smashed 
down field to Maryland's 4, with Caro- 
lina's Gantt going over on the next 
play. 

In the second quarter the Terps 
hung up another hard earned score. 
Shemonski slapped down a Carolina 
pass on the Terps' 24, which was fol- 
lowed by sharp, aggressive plays fea- 
turing Maryland's Scarbath, Felton 
and Hanulak. That took the pigskin to 
the Carolina 11-yard line. Beset by 
rushing Carolina tacklers Shemonski 
got set, moved, got set again, to throw 
a perfect strike into the midriff of 
Weidensaul for a score. Maryland's 
kicks were good. The half ended 14 
to 7 and that's how it stayed. 

Breaks? When the other fellow drops 
the marbles it's the alert, smart boy 
who is there to pick them up; but fast! 
Some years ago Grantland Rice, dean 
of sports writers, penned something 
that went about like this: - 

"This message stands and this alone. 
For ages there on a graven stone. 
It iras handed down from the hill- 
top's gleam, 
'The breaks will go to the FIGHT- 
ING TEAM!'" 



[44] 



The North Carolina-Maryland game 
was featured nationally in news reels 
and on TV as the game of the week. A 
week later the Tarheels, losing to Wake 
Forest, appeared to be far below the 
"pointing peak" they had displayed in 
their great stand against Maryland. 

Maryland 27, LSU 

Louisiana State, a team that had de- 
feated Rice, Alabama, Georgia and 
Mississippi Southern, losing only to un- 
beaten Georgia Tech, failed to stand up 
against expansive Jim Tatum's Trucu- 
lent Terps either defensively or offen- 
sively and there was considerable 
opinion among the crowd of 38,000 to 
the effect that the Terrapins were just 
what the doctor ordered for this year's 
Sugar Bowl at New Orleans. 

Maryland, AP-ranked No. 5 before 
the game, came away from it in the 
No. 4 AP slot. 

Maryland, not up to the class they 
displayed against North Carolina a 
week previously — and not subjected to 
the same opposition North Carolina had 
afforded — charged some of their fumb- 
ling to the slippery ball, a commodity 
that comes along with night games on 
the banks of the Father of Waters and 
the mist that rolls off of his broad back 
into the stadium of the Bayou Tigers. 
Temperature 78°; humidity 79°. 

For two quarters the LSU lads, big, 
bold and boisterous, had the Terrapins 
pretty well handcuffed, aided by the 
slippery ball. 

However, once the Terps got rolling 
the Tigers were easily handled by lads 
who proved that mist from the not too 
broad bosooziasm of the relatively 
minor body of water known as Paint 
Branch caresses crowns of pretty good 
football players too. Selah. 

Five minutes before half time Quar- 
terback Jack Scarbath sped for two 
touchdowns in three minutes and, 
thenceforth, the Terps gave a good imi- 
tation of Clyde Beatty or Carl Hagen- 
beck training tigers sans whip, pistol 
shots or paper hoops. 

Scarbath topped a 43-yard drive with 
a touchdown smash and, two minutes 
later, bolted across after a 54-yard 
canter. 

Bob Shemonski scored in the third 
and Chet Hanulak tallied in the final 
stanza. 

It was "Tiger, tiger burning bright, 
could a humble terp put out your 
tight?" as LSU got into Maryland 
territory only thrice. Their dying effort 
in the closing minutes took them 63 
yards to the Maryland 3-yard-line. 
There the third and fourth stringers 
held and the Tigers lost their last 
chance to score. 

Dick Modzelewski was all over the 
field hauling down Tiger backs, knock- 
ing them down as fast as they got up. 

Li'l Mo was injured in the third quar- 
ter and LSU made its only two good 
offensive efforts of the evening. Dick 
was the star of the game. 

Only in their third TD march did 
the Tatumsters use a pass, gaining 
most of their 266 yards through the 
guards and up the middle. 



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Ed Fullerton intercepted a pass to 
launch the 44-yard scoring expedition 
and Bobby Ward pounced on a fumble 
on the Tiger 10 to set up the fourth 
period score. 

Before Scarbath broke up the ball 
game with his two backbreakers the 
Terps were up to their earlobes in hot 
water. 

Joe Petruzzo fumbled a punt on the 
Maryland 10 in the first. The ball 
bounced around for a few seconds but 
Linebacker Dave Cianelli, fighting off 
three Tigers, finally regained the ball 
for the Terps on their own six. 

Prior thereto, Halfback Ralph Fel- 
ton bobbled on the LSU 15. The Tigers 
got the ball but did nothing with it. 

Sophomore Bernie Faloney started 
the Scarbath scoring drive with a 54- 
yard punt to the Tiger 1-foot line. 

LSU kicked to their 43-yard line and 
the Terps rolled with Shemonski, Ed 
Modzelewski, Scarbath and Felton 
starring. LSU spread for an end run, 
saw Scarbath tally through the middle. 
Decker kicked. 7-0. 

The Terps, who had intended to de- 
pend up an all-out passing game, ex- 
perienced no trouble in making head- 
way on the ground. 

Scarbath's flank tosses to Felton and 
Ed Modzelewski put the Terps on their 
own 46. Again LSU spread for the 
pitchout play. Scarbath feinted for one 
to Felton, tucked the ball under his 
own wing, however, and tip-toed 
through the tulips. Three tacklers 
actually had hold of the Baltimore lad, 
but to no avail. Decker's kick was 
blocked. 

In the third Scarbath flubbed the 
oval as another TD loomed on the hori- 
zon. LSU recovered but seconds later 
Fullerton cabbaged onto a LSU pass 
and the Terps rode again for 44 yards 
in 8 plays. Pass, Shemonski to Felton, 
plus a nifty reverse for a 21-yard trot 
and the Terrapin was again perched 
within sniffing distance of the Tiger's 
lair. Shemonski layed it in there for 
his first score of '51. Terp Decker's 
kick made it 21-0. 

In the 4th, All-American Bob Ward 
fell on LSU's fumble on the 10. A 
perfect reverse, the ball Modzelewski 
to Hanulak and the final score, Decker's 
kick again good, 27-0. The mighty 
Bayou Tiger had rolled over and played 
dead. 

Only a few miles from the Stadium 
James P. Randall, a homesick native of 
Baltimore, had sat under a magnolia 
tree and written Maryland, My Mary- 
land. There was plenty reason for 
joyously yodeling it this night. If one 
Marylander aided by the inspiration 
of a magnolia-scented Louisiana moon, 
could take Germany's "Oh Tannen- 
baum" and fashion it into "Maryland," 
these younger Marylanders could also 
prove that, like Germany's Hagenbeck, 
"our peeble are vidout a doubt dhe best 
tiger trainers in dhe whole vurld." 

Maryland 35, Missouri 

Don Faurot's Mizzou Tigers were 
tamed by Coach Jim Tatum's Terps 
just as easily as the Bayou Tigers a 



week before. For the Homecoming 
game Maryland completely outclassed 
the lads who had been told by President 
Truman to go in and win. 

The crowd was held down to 23,000 
by two days of storm, rain and snow, 
with the skies clearing shortly before 
game time. 

In a sea of mud the Terps stuck to 
the Infantry, trying only three passes, 
all failures. The 35 points scored by 
Maryland might have been higher ex- 
cept for several fumbles recovered by 
Missouri while Maryland was in a scor- 
ing position close up to the Tigers' 
goal line. The Tigers tried 28 passes. 
Only three were good. 

So badly was Missouri outclassed that 
only a short portion of the fourth quar- 
ter, made possible by successful desper- 
ation passes, was played in Terp terri- 
tory and even that threat blew up with 
the loudest and most resounding bang 
of the day when a good looking bullet 
toss right on the goal line was nailed 
by 19-year-old Freshman Joe Horning 
who behind terrific blocking, went the 
length of the field to score. 

Young Homing's run, incidentally 
made possible by a perfectly executed 
and slightly terrific block by Trexler, 
goes in the record book as a 100-yard 
canter, although the movies actually 
show 105. It broke the Maryland record 
set by Tommy Mont against W&L in 
1946. 

With the entire Terp offense rolling 
in "team" style and the Maryland de- 
fense tighter than the proverbial drum, 
the high men on the Tatum pole did 
things right all afternoon. Ed Modzel- 
ewski, performing like a combination 
tank and bulldozer, battered through 
the Mizzou line to lead the assault that 
set up two scoring plays for Jack Scar- 
bath and two for Chet Hanulak. 

So perfect was the Maryland play 
that Decker's five conversion boots 
were pretty much accepted as routine 
from a clicking and well oiled grid 
machine. When Chick Fry got in there 
to block a Missouri punt it took Coach 
Jim Tatum to point out that that per- 
formance was something rare too. The 
crowd took it for granted as part of 
the show put on by a top rung team 
having a good day of it. 

The game was less than nine minutes 
old when Jack Scarbath climaxed a 
68-yard drive with a 21-yard quarter- 
back snitch to score. Nine plays had 
put the ball down there. On the tenth, 
Scarbath hit the scoreboard behind all- 
American Bob Ward's interference. 
Maryland 7; Missouri 0. 

In the second, Maryland had flubbed 
two scoring set-ups when, after a 43- 
yard drive, Hanulak went through a 
maze of outstretched Missouri arms for 
31 yards and the second tally. Mary- 
land 14; Missouri 0. 

In the third, Ed Kensler, who played 
a great game all afternoon, intercepted 
a Tiger pass that set up another quar- 
terback sneak score for Scarbath. 
Shortly thereafter a Tiger punt plopped 
short. Ralph Felton and Hanulak alter- 
nated as ball carriers to move to the 



[46] 



21 where Hanulak hackensacked it 
across for his second score. Maryland 
32; Missouri 0. 

Missouri tried everything known in 
the split T book and included the spread 
that had beaten Nebraska. However, 
this was something else again, i.e., a 
team which Coach Don Faurot classed 
as "the best we have seen." Desper- 
ately, in the fourth quarter, from the 
spread, Faurot's Tigers were getting 
right down there when, zingo, as can 
happen in such dangerous gambling 
tactics, Tiger Scardino's pass, labeled 
"TD" and no foolin' saw young Horning 
come in from the flank, grab the pass 
on a dead run and continue the motion 
straight down the side line stripe to 
make it Maryland 35; Missouri 0. 

Missouri's Coach Faurot summed it 
up, "That big Ed Modzelewski, running 
down the middle, broke our backs," 
adding, "Maryland is as strong as SMU, 
one of the best defensive teams in the 
country; in fact, Maryland is the best 
team we've seen this season." 

The win over Missouri moved Mary- 
land up to No. 3 in the national AP 
ratings, topped only by Tennessee and 
Illinois, with Princeton, Michigan State, 
Southern California, Stanford, Georgia 
Tech, Wisconsin and Texas rated be- 
hind the Tatumterps, with predictions 
being freely made of an unbeaten sea- 
son for Maryland and Sugar Bowl 
game for the Terps against Tennessee. 

A Guy in Maryville 

The ratings story of the week broke 
from Maryville, Tennessee, where Man- 
aging Editor Dean Stone, Maryville 
Daily Times, noted Maryville College 
rated in the third ten with 7 points. 
"I wonder if our Western Union oper- 
ator, just from force of habit," mused 
Editor Stone, "sent my vote for 'Mary- 
land' out as 'Maryville.' " Check up 
revealed that that was presackly wha' 
hoppen. That's how come Maryville 
College, which hasn't won a game in 
two years, got 7 points and Maryland 
wound up with 7 less than it should 
have had. 

Maryland 40; Navy 21 

That other Maryland team, i.e. the 
Naval Academy at Annapolis, though 
overmatched against the Terrapins, 
fought tooth and toenail to make it an 
interesting battle, 40 to 21, at Balti- 
more Stadium. 

Everybody and their old Dutch uncles, 
Kukla, Fran and Ollie, Schneewittchen 
und die Sieben Zwerge and a lot of 
other guys and dolls made it about 
39,000 sitting in on the spectacle. 

The show opened with the future 
Admirals unfurling a gigantic banner, 
upon it this strange device, "Welcome 
to the Big Leagues." The reaction of 
those who have been following the 
smooth working, well coached, deep and 
powerpacked Terps figured the midship- 
men must be writing messages to them- 
selves. 

A strong Navy line, better than 
others that have faced the Terps, had 
Jim Tatum's well schooled warriors 
taking to the air. Two of their touch- 
downs were by air and three others 



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were set up via that route. Maryland's 
line was even better than Navy's and 
the Tars also took to the air. Maryland 
made good 16 passes out of 32 tries 
while Navy completed 12 of 32 at- 
tempts. 

Navy was pointing for this one. Its 
a tough one for them to lose and the 
crowd sensed that the Blue and Gold 
was aiming for one of those upsets 
they slip over on the Army to the con- 
sternation of critics and experts. The 
Navy had hardly catted their anchor 
when, for the first time this year, 
Maryland was trailing. Navy's Brady, 
on the goal line, took a Maryland punt 
for 100 yards and a touchdown. With 
the reaction expected from a team of 
champs the Terps caught five. In less 
than three minutes they tied it up. 
Felton, Modzelewski, Shemonski and 
Scarbath ripped off gains and Weiden- 
saul scored on a pass from Scarbath. 
Decker kicked. Maryland 7! Navy 7. 

Navy held Maryland in Navy terri- 
tory when John Alderton fell on a 
Middy fumble. The sailors held on 
ground plays but a pitchout, Scarbath 
to Fullerton made it Maryland 14; 
Navy 7. Decker booted. 

Maryland intercepted a pass and 
seemed bound for the circus but Navy 
fought 'em off and broke through twice 
to throw Scarbath for losses. A Navy 
win still seemed possible at the end 
of the half in spite of the fact that 
the Terptatums were playing a bang-up 
brand of alert ball. 

The Terrapin barrage began in the 
third quarter. Raking staunch Navy 
fore and aft, the Terps tallied three 
times in eleven minutes. Scarbath and 
Hanulak broke through repeatedly, and 
passes from Scarbath to Weidensaul 
were good. Then Scarbath heaved a 
long one to Lindsay for a 58-yard TD. 
Decker kicked to make it Maryland 21; 
Navy 7. 

Navy lost the ball on downs and the 
Terps rolled some more. After a pass, 
Scarbath to Colteryahn, Ed Modzelew- 
ski bolted through to score. Decker's 
toe made it 28-7. 

Maryland's Maletzky blocked a punt 
to put the ball in the Terrapin's claws 
on the 39. Six plays included a 20-yard 
pass from Scarbath to Shemonski on 
the two-yard line. Maryland 34; Navy 
7. 

In the final stanza Coach Tatum used 
his youngsters but found the Navy no 
bargain. They moved from their own 
23 for a touchdown made possible by 
a 42-yard pass. Maryland 34; Navy 14. 

Navy snagged another Terp pass but 
lost the oval on downs while in a 
scoring position. Big Mo, believe it or 
not, was hit hard enough to lose the 
ball on the 16 marker. Three plays 
put it on the 8 and a pass put it over. 
Maryland 34; Navy 21. That was all 
for the Navy. 

A drive by the Tatumkins started on 
the Maryland 42 and moved to Navy's 
3 where, Modzelewski to Fullerton, it 
was put over. Decker missed one 
(that's rare) to make it 40 to 21. 



Reaction ran all the way from high 
praise for Navy's stand againt a team 
that reflected the sterling combination 
of leadership, coaching and ability, to 
opinion that College Park's Byrdmen 
were about the best in the country. 
One pessimistic Annapolitan moaned, 
however, "Hell, that one even lost us 
the STATE championship!" 

But what a NATURAL that intra- 
state classic is, as reflected by the at- 
tendance. 

Big Jim Tatum's praise for Navy 
was high, "They had us worried," he 
said, "because today they were UP and 
a far better team than their record 
indicates." Others observed that Navy 
was just up against large and fast 
chunks of real gridiron class. 

Unbeaten Maryland was ranked 3rd 
in the national AP poll before the Navy 
game. After the game the Terps were 
dropped to 5th place because Michigan 
State, Tennessee, Illinois and Stanford, 
tabbed in that order ahead of the Ter- 
rapin Tatum team. They had turned 
in higher scores than our fellers. 



"Tickets? 3 for a nickel!" 

Baltimore school teacher, Josephine 
Mines, spotted pupil Dickie Cook, 8, 
arranging pieces of brightly colored 
pasteboard on his desk in a makeshift 
jigsaw puzzle. He explained classmate 
Johnny Anderson had given him the 
pasteboards. Johnny explained that 
Wayne Snyder had sold these to him 
at the rate of three for a nickel. Wayne 
had forty of the little cards. He had 
found them on a bus. They were 
dropped there by Don Cronin, insur- 
ance man, who bought them to use as 
prizes. An advertisement in the Sun 
brought Don a-runnin'. The 40 paste- 
boards were tickets for Navy-Maryland. 
Mrs. Mines got two of 'em as her 
"prize." 

Mighty Mo Rated 

Mighty Mo Modzelewski, Maryland's 
rugged fullback, gained the recognition 
of being named Back-of-the-Week, due 
to his outstanding performance in the 
Navy game. 

The Terps gained 138 yards by 
rushing. Modzelewski got 127 of them, 
carried the pigskin over Navy's goal 
line twice and, throughout the game, 
powered and outplayed the opposition. 

Modzelewski is 22 years old, six feet 
tall, and weighs about 210 pounds. He 
was moved from halfback to fullback 
this year because of his powerful 
frame. He is a native of West Natrona, 
Pa., and is in his final year at Mary- 
land. 

Maryland 53; N. C. State 
Maryland outclassed North Carolina 
State, 53 to 0. The Terps had just 
accepted a bid to meet Tennessee in the 
Sugar Bowl. They played like cham- 
pions, with smooth team work para- 
mount. Coach Jim Tatum labeled this 
one, "Our best performance of the 
year," adding, "our lads could do no 



[48] 



wrong. If we play that sort of game 
against Tennessee they'll know they've 
been in a ball game." 

It was one sided, the fighting but 
futile State squad, absorbing the worst 
beating ever handed it during Coach 
Beattie Feathers' regime. 

State had little but Alex Webster, 
a big and willing triplethreat tailback. 

Maryland, on the other hand, was 
a ball club that had everything; a de- 
vastating running game, enough pass- 
ing to keep State off balance, a rugged 
defensive line and a pass defense that 
stopped State threats and racked up 
one touchdown on an interception. 

Maryland's smashing backs split the 
touchdowns six ways. Ed Modzelewski 
and Ralph Felton sparked the scoring. 

It was Maryland's tenth straight 
victory since State upset the Terps last 
year. 

Maryland tallied first after a bad 
Terps punt was downed on the State 
20. Felton skirted right end to the 1 
and Scarbath sneaked over. Guard 
Don Decker kicked the first of five 
extra points. 

Then Maryland marched 70 yards in 
eight plays, Felton dashing the last 20 
yards. 

Guard Ed Kensler, hot as a pistol 
all afternoon, intercepted a pass on 
the 8 and ran it back to Maryland's 
32 to end one State threat, and a few 
minutes later he hooked on to another 
aerial and raced over for a touchdown. 

Guard Bill Maletzky intercepted a 
pass on his 41, and Maryland's running 
and passing took the ball to the 2 in 
four plays. Scarbath sneaked to an- 
other score. 

State's only other scoring chance 
died on the Maryland 15 and Maryland 
promptly ground downfield to the State 
30. Scarbath was set back to his 45, 
but from there passed 3 yards to Col- 
teryahn, who scored behind powerful 
blocking in the closing minutes of the 
second period. 

Maryland scored again in the third. 
The Terps went 64 yards, Modzelewski 
bulling off tackle to score from the 4. 

Mighty Mo did it again early in the 
final period, charging through tackle 
for 3 yards after doing most of the 
work in moving the ball down from the 
35. 

Maryland's final tally came when 
Faloney tossed a pass from the 11 
to Halfback Fullerton, who raced over 
the goal. 

Felton led Maryland's ground gain- 
ers with 186 yards. 

Fourth Place 

After the wide score of the N. C. 
State game our doughty Terps drew 
fourth place (the man said "fourth") 
in the AP poll. Michigan State, which 
had a tough time winning from In- 
diana rated No. 2. What the — oh well. 
The poll racked 'em up like this: — 

Points 

1. Tennessee 1348 

2. Michigan State 1290 

3. Stanford 1193 

4. Maryland 1167 

5. Princeton 814 

6. Illinois 802 

7. Georgia Tech 673 

8. Wisconsin 442 

9. Kentucky 339 

10. Baylor 333 



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[49] 



We are proud 
to have played 
a part in 
the building 
program of 
this University. 

EDWIN 

WILSON 

BOOTH 

Architect 
SALISBURY, MD. 



PAIL V. 
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PAVING CONTRACTOR 
Asphalt • Concrete 

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Phone 7590 
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Phone 1494-5 



Maryland 54; West Virginia 7 

Jubilant, undefeated and Sugar Bowl 
bound, members of Maryland's greatest 
football team, after playing rings 
around West Virginia, 54 to 7, tossed 
Head Coach Jim Tatum into the post- 
game showers for the most enjoyable 
dousing the Terps' big mentor ever 
received. To top the entree they also 
tossed nattily dressed trainer Duke 
Wyre in for dessert. Wait'll ESQUIRE 
hears about that! They may sue. 

Maryland ran roughshod over the 
Mountaineers. Gerald Fisher, a 19- 
year-old 165-pound quarterback who 
passed on all but eight plays, starred 
for the West Virginians. 

Ed. Modzelewski tore up the Moun- 
taineers line and scored two touch- 
downs. 

Jim Tatum played his substitutes 
most of the second period. They too 
were too good for West Virginia. 

Modzelewski made 131 yards in four- 
teen carries, the sixth time this year 
he has outgained the entire opposing 
team on the ground. 

Maryland scored from 62 yards in 
the first six minutes, the first time it 
got the ball. Modzelewski went off 
tackle and Decker kicked the first of 
six extra points. 

An 85-yard march preceded the sec- 
ond score. Jack Scarbath passed from 
the West Virginia 42 to Lindsay on 
the 11 who scored. 

Bernie Paloney intercepted a Fisher 
pass on the West Virginia 32 and 
rambled to the 2-yard line. Modzelew- 
ski put it over. 

In the second, Scarbath passed from 
the West Virginia 27 to Weidensaul in 
the end zone. 

West Virginia scored when Fisher, 
after taking his team to the Maryland 
5-yard line on a series of passes, hit 
End Bill Marker on the 1-yard line 
for a score. Stone converted. 

Maryland struck back with Ed Ful- 
lerton going 48 yards to the 16. Mod- 
zelewski carried to the 10, and Scar- 
bath passed to Lloyd Colteryahn to 
score. 

The Terps struck again in the third 
with Shoo-Shoo Shemonski taking a 
pitchout for 21 yards and a score. 

Faloney, going like a jet plane, was 
tackled and, while falling, lateraled to 
Karney Scioscia for a sensational tally. 
Maryland reserves were set back to 
half a yard of their own goal on pen- 
alties. Instead of kicking they went 
99% yards for the final touchdown, 
as Joe Horning scampered 78 yards 
to score. 






The season 


closed 


with Maryland 


A 


P-rated No. 3 


viz 


: — 




l 


Tennessee 




11. 


Texas Ch. 


2. 


Mich. St. 




12. 


California 


3. 


MARYLAND 




13. 


Virginia 


4. 


Illinois 




14. 


San. Fran. 


5. 


Georgia Tech 




15. 


Kentucky 


fi. 


Princeton 




16. 


Boston U. 


7. 


Stanford 




17. 


UCLA 


8. 


Wisconsin 




18. 


Wash. St. 


9. 


Baylor 




19. 


Holy Cross 


10. 


Oklahoma 




20. 


CIcmson 



BASKETBALL 

Millikan Eyes Successful 
Basketball Campaign 

By Joe F. Blair 



ARYLAND has back 
this year the same 
team that did such a 
fine job for us in the 
1950-51 campaign. They 
were new and I was 
new and we managed to 
finish the season with a 
fine record, so I'm hoping with this 
veteran nucleus and a lot more bench 
strength to have as good as, if not a 
better record, than last year's 16-11 
slate." That is how the Terps' likeable 
and popular young basketball coach, 
H. A. "Bud" Millikan sums up the pros- 
pects for the 1951-52 court season. 

The genial Millikan is starting his 
second year at Maryland; also his sec- 
ond term in collegiate coaching ranks. 
The personable mid-westerner, an Ail- 
American at Oklahoma A&M in 1942, 
came to College Park from an Iowa 
High School, and immediately molded 
together a group of strangers into a 
team that went to the Southern Con- 
ference Tournament. They almost 
pulled the upset of the year by scaring 
the wits out of North Carolina State 
in the semi-finals, only to lose, 54-45. 
Since October 15 Millikan has been 
readying his charges for their 21-game 
schedule, 14 of which are Conference 
engagements. Nine contests are 
scheduled as home attractions in Rit- 
chie Coliseum. 

Seven lettermen are back to help 
guide the destiny of what could be one 
of the best court teams in Terp his- 
tory. Heading the list are seniors and 
Co-captains Lee Brawley and Dick 
Koffenberger. Brawley, by scoring 404 
points, broke the all-time Maryland 
scoring record of 347 he himself set in 
his sophomore year. He averaged 15 
points a game last season. Koffen- 
berger, one of the finest floor men in 
the Conference, scored 265 points for a 
9.8 average. Koffenberger is an excel- 
lent team player and exceptional ball 
handler. 

The "find" of last year was sopho- 
more center Don Moran. After report- 
ing to Millikan for practice there didn't 
seem to be too much chance for 
"Ozark Ike." But after six weeks of 
Millikan's conditioning he won a start- 
ing berth and never relinquished it. 
Now he is figured to be way ahead of 
the pack when he gets around the post. 
He scored 245 points as a soph for a 
9.1 showing per game. 

Senior Jim Johnson, who plays hard 
consistently and is one of the league's 
best men at retrieving rebounds, con- 
tributed 222 points through the nets 
for an 8.2 average. Manis, who doesn't 
figure to score too often, had 103 
points. The other two lettermen return- 
ing are Tom Connelly and Frank Fel- 



[50] 




:.-*.*..*.„*»**. 



COURT CO-CAPTAINS 



DICK KOFFENBERGER 
Guard 



lows, both juniors. They were the ex- 
tent of Millikan's depth last year. Mor- 
ris Levin, another junior, has strength- 
ened the list of returnees. 

Coming up from the freshman squad 
to lend a big hand to the team that was 
the surprise package of the Conference 
last year are several players who have 
been impressive during early drills. 
They include Gene Shue, 6-2 sharp- 
shooter from Baltimore; Ralph Greco, 
a 6-1 aggressive package from Ali- 
quippa, Pa.; two Washington boys, 
Ronnie Brooks, 6-1, who played at Ana- 
costia High School, and Don Dunlop, 
6-5, from McKinley Tech High School. 
Dunlop is the tallest man on the squad. 

Others pushing for a place on the 
team are junior Bob Marendt, and 
sophs Tom Rulis, Mahoney City, Pa., 
and Bob Moorhead, Solomons, Md. 

Millikan, runner-up to States' Ever- 
ett Case for Conference Coach-of-the- 
Year honors, hopes to show more offen- 
sive punch this year now that his 
"ponies" have a year's experience of 
his style of play tucked away and his 
soph reserves had some instruction 
from him during their schedule under 
frosh coach Burris Husman. 

No doubt fans will see a faster bas- 
ketball game this year as well as one 
that is sure to be top defensively. 
Coach Millikan thrives on the latter but 
realizes you've got to score to win. His 
tactics of "hold the ball" until you have 
a sure shot still goes, but with great 
improvement and more confidence of his 
team, Millikan and his "roundballers" 
could bring Maryland one of its best 
basketball seasons. 

*•••••••*•••* 

PRESIDENT H. C. BYRD:— 

"Athletes are made of the stuff neces- 
sary for leadership." 



LEE BRAWLEY 

Forward 



1951-52 Varsity Schedule 

Dec. 3 Virginia 

*Dec. 5 Washington and Lee 

Dec. 8 Pennsylvania 

*Dec. 12 William and Mary 

Dec. 15 West Virginia 

Dec. 18 V.M.I. 

Dec. 19 Washington and Lee 

Jan. 3 North Carolina 

Jan. 5 Navy 

Jan. 7 Virginia 

1 Jan. 10 Georgetown 

*Jan. 12 Rutgers 

"Jan. 18 North Carolina 

Feb. 9 V.M.I. 

*Feb. 14 Richmond 

Feb. 16 William and Mary 

Feb. 18 Duke 

Feb. 21 Georgetown 

Feb. 27 Richmond 

"Feb. 29 George Washington 

"Mar. 1 Davidson 



'Home Games at College Park. 




WEILL 




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Telephone: 

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CRISFIELD, 

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TRYING FOR THE TEAM 

"O.K., O.K., O.K., Snorky. Get up off of the 
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going to carry on THAT way, you can join the 
cheer leaders!" 

[51] 



d5arttett 

Waterfront and Inland 

Farms and Estates 

Office Phone 118 - Residence 1784 

TIDEWATER INN 

EASTON, MARYLAND 



CAMILLE 

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Post Office Box 102 

R. W. Murphy 
General Manager 

SALISBURY, MD. 

Phone 4031 





JACK LARTZ Wins LIFE Photo Contest Prize 

EX-LEATHERNECK Jack Lartz, 28 '51, Maryland grad- 
uate, pictured at right, was awarded a third honorable 
mention prize of $25 in the picture story division of LIFE'S 
Contest for Young Photographers. Above is his prize winner. 

Lartz, a staff photographer for the Washington Post 
since 1949, started taking pictures when he was assigned 
to photographic school at Quantico, Virginia, in the Marine 
Corps in 1942. He was in the Marines for three years, two 
of which he spent in the Pacific. His pictures have been 
published in LIFE as well as the Washington Post and, as a 
member of the White House News Photographers Associa- 
tion, he has won a second prize in the feature class of the 
organization's Contest. 

The son of Mr. and Mrs. John F. Lartz of Washington, 
D. C, he was married in 1946, has one daughter and lives 
in Rockville. 




Jack Lartz 



FULLERTON BROKE RECORD 

Ed Fullerton, Terp halfback, broke 
an all-time Maryland football record 
with his 86-yard touchdown run in 
the game against Georgia. 

The longest previous run from scrim- 
mage had been Hubie Werner's 82-yard 
sprint against West Virginia in 1948. 

His scoring run against Georgia was 
made on one of the two times he carried 
the ball. 

For his outstanding play in Mary- 
land's 54-14 rout of Washington & Lee, 
Fullerton was named by the Washing- 
ton Touchdown Club as outstanding 

[52] 



player of the week in the Washington 
area. 

Last year Fullerton scored three 
times while playing offensive fullback. 
He was the Terps fourth leading run- 
ner with 209 yards gained in 47 
attempts, giving him a 4.2 average. 

Fullerton, a 5' 11" 190-pound half- 
back, came to the University from 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 

*••**•••••••• 
ADMIRAL HENRY WILSON, U.S.N:— 
".4 winner never quits. A quitter 
never wins." 



BOXING 

Looks Like A Good Season 
With Promising Talent 




16- 
23- 

29- 



Feb. 

Feb. 

: Feb. 

Feb. 

Feb. 
= :: Mar. 8- 
Mar. 15- 
Mar. 22- 
Mar. 29- 
Apr. 5 



ARYLAND boxers, un- 
der Coach Frank Cron- 
in, are looking forward 
to a season which com- 
mits them to combat 
against the same 

'? teams the truculent 
Terps faced in 1951, 



1— The Citadel 
9 — Quantico Marines 
Miami 

Army 

Michigan State 

South Carolina 

L.S.U. 

Open 

So. Inv. Tourn., at LSU 

-NCAA Tour, at Wisconsin 



* Four home meets at College Park 

What might easily turn out to be 
the most highly talented team in Mary- 
land ring history, barring the vicissi- 
tudes that upset plans occasionally, 
lines up like this:- 

125 — Gary Garber, World's Army 
Bantam champion, '50; runner up '51, 
Pan-American Olympic Team. 

Bobby Schwartz, novice from last 
year's team. 

130 — Jackie Letzer, 125 pounder from 
last year. Greatly improved product of 
University's boxing program. 

Leon Revoili; some previous experi- 
ence at Massanutten. 

135 — Bryant Seymour, former Fox 
Lake High School star from Chicago. 

Bob Theofield, from last year's team. 

145 — Gary Fisher, South Atlantic and 
Maryland lightweight champion, AAU. 

155— Bill O'Brien, from the 1949 
team. Formerly with Quantico Marines. 
Returned from tour of duty in Marine 
Corps. 

Bill Mclnnis, Kannapolis, N. C, na- 
tional scholastic champion, Piedmont 
Tournament and Carolumas Golden 
Gloves champion, AAU. 

165 — Ronnie Rhodes, Abilene, Texas. 
Former Texas open 160 pound cham- 
pion, AAU. 

175 — Dave Ortel, vastly improved 
product of Maryland's boxing program. 

Charles Hohman, newcomer. 

Unlimited — Cal Quenstedt, 175 
pounder last year, ex-Charlotte Hall 
boxer. 

Jim Stewart, who has done some box- 
ing in the Marine Corps. 

William Dovell and Tom Brode. 

THEODORE ROOSEVELT 

"The credit belongs to the man who 
is actually in the arena. His place shall 
never be with those cold and timid souls 
who have tasted neither victory nor 
defeat." 



Cooperating with the 

Agriculture Department 



of the 



University of Maryland 



Four States Livestock, Inc. 



Hagerstown, Maryland 



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Colonial Hardwood 
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Manufacturers of Colonial 
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[53] 



THE 

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* Established 1859 * 

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Industrial & Agricultural Lime 

Concrete & Cinder Block 

Cement - Sand - Pipe 

Transit Mixed Concrete 

Free State Masonry Mortar 

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General Offices 

Lime Kiln 
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PHONES 

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Buckeystown 3511 



Wm. D. Bowers 
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PHONE: FREDERICK 2300 



T. EDGIE RUSSELL 

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FREDERICK, MARYLAND 



EBERT'S 

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Crown Oil & Wax Co. 

DISTRIBUTORS 

Shell Petroleum Products 

Phone FREDERICK 1034 
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JOEL ADLEBERG 

Southern Conference Champion 

Who Is Team Captain 




WRESTLING 

Coach Sully Krouse Anticipates 

"best season ever" 

By Stan Rubenstein 



LRYLAND'S wrestlers, 
led by Southern Con- 
ference champion and 
this year's team cap- 
• tain, Joel Adleberg, will 
undertake the "toughest 
schedule" in Maryland 
wrestling history ac- 
cording to Coach Sully Krouse. The 
Old Liners will stage their first grapple 
fest here on December 15 against West 
Virginia. 

Coach Krouse has expressed the 
opinion that "the coming wrestling 
season will be the best we've ever had 
at Maryland." His optimistic opinion 
is based on the fact that all members 
of last year's undefeated fi-eshman 
team will move up to varsity positions 
this year to bolster the array of return- 
ing lettermen. Only notable loss to the 
squad is Ray Lysakowski who is no 
longer in school. 

Adleberg, who is listed at 157 lbs., 
will lead Joe Bourdon, 121 lbs.; Sid 
Cohen, 167 lbs.; Richard Norair, 157 
lbs.; Adolph Parulis, 121 lbs.; and Jack 
Shanahan, 175 lbs.; all returning letter- 
men, plus a brother combination of 
Ernie and Robert Fischer, Cliff Mat- 
hews, and Rodney Norris, all undefeat- 
ed members of last year's frosh squad. 
Another member of the 1951-52 team 
will be John Baker, a second place win- 
ner in the S. C. finals. Bourdon and 
Shanahan also earned places in the 
final Conference standings. 

Following the Mountaineer match, 
the wrestlers will travel to meet Loyola 
of Baltimore on January 5 and Navy 
on January 12. On February 2, the 
Terps will meet their outstanding op- 
ponent of the season, Penn State. The 
Staters are rated No. 3 in the nation. 



Duke will play host to the Maryland 
team on February 9, and Johns Hop- 
kins, an arch rival, will invade College 
Park on February 13. North Carolina 
will wrestle here on February 22 for 
the last home dual match of the sea- 
son. Last year's S. C. team champs, 
V. M. I. will be the last away dual 
match on March 1. 

Tournaments get underway on March 
7 and 8 with the Southern Conference 
finals. The site has not yet been deter- 
mined. Maryland will be the scene of 
the District AAU wrestling tourna- 
ment during the middle of March. 



IN INDIANA 




Col. Miller 



"Critics of body contact sports, in 
magazine articles and in movies, have 
entirely missed the objective purposes 
of sports," said Colonel Harvey L. 
Miller, University of Maryland, guest 
speaker at the Indiana Foremen's 
Club's annual Sports Night, held at 
Richmond, Indiana, November 14th, "in 
that they have failed to ask whether 
or not sports are worth their risks." 

"The principal ob- 
jectives of contact! 
sports," he said, "are 
to imbue participants 
and onlookers alike 
with combativeness 
and fortitude. You 
can't win wars on a| 
sports diet of canas- 
ta or crocinole." 

"Critics of sports," 
said Miller, "evade 
the No. 1 question. 
Does the good done 
for millions justify the relatively few 
fatalities and major injuries?" 

"The objective of sports," Miller 
went on to say, "should include maxi- 
mum participation at all levels. The 
fact that a sport becomes professional 
or attracts great crowds at a non- 
professional level, proves chiefly that 
the public wants sports of the body con- 
tact variety. TV surveys attest to the 
fact that sports, particularly boxing, 
lead all other video attractions. 

"There is no closed season for articles 
against boxing," Miller continued, "as 
everything and everybody connected 
with the sport comes in for condemna- 
tion. Football gets off somewhat lighter, 
where only methods of procurement and 
over-emphasis are castigated. These 
anti-sports effusions emanate from 
writers who, noting that the market 
is open for such articles, jump on board 
a bandwagon propelled by non-existent 
statistics in support of opinions already 
formed. Then, too always with us, in 
aeternum, are the delightful old ladies 
of both sexes who have no use for 
virile sports of any sort." 

"Our country," the speaker concluded, 
"was founded on competition. Whether 
sports critics realize it or not, reduc- 
tion of sports activities would be play- 
ing squarely into the hands of our 
nation's enemies. De-emphasis on 
sports surely would work toward taking 
some of the fight out of America." 



[54] 



The Foremen's Club, comprised of 
representatives of leading industrial 
firms, has featured annual Sports 
Nights since 1924. 

Coach Bill Elias '48 

The honor guests at the banquet 
were the members of the Indiana State 
high school championship football 
team from Richmond High, as well as 
the faculty of that school. The head 
coach is Bill Elias, (Md Phys Ed '48). 
Top faculty members highly lauded 
Coach Elias and the latter credited 
Maryland's College of Physical Educa- 
tion for most of the success he has 
enjoyed. 

At Bethesda 

A week later Colonel Miller spoke 
on the same subject at a joint meeting 
of the Bethesda Kiwanis and Rotary 
Clubs. 



MEADE RESIGNS 

"Jumbo Jim" Meade resigned as 
athletic director and backfield coach at 
Furman university. 

Meade, of Havre de Grace, a former 
Maryland and Washington Redskin 
star, has been athletic director at Fur- 
man for the past two years and has 
been backfield coach for the past three 
seasons. 



ELIAS HONORED 

Bill Elias, former Maryland football 
star, now coaching Richmond (Ind.) 
High School has been, for the second 
straight year, named "Indiana's Coach 
of the Year." Bill's team won the State 
title. 




Mr. CLARENCE LWHIPP 

ATHLETIC CONSULTANT 



IN WURZBURG, GERMANY 

Clarence L. Whipp, pictured above, graduate 
of the University of Maryland in '49, has been 
named athletic consultant at Wurzburg Mili- 
tary Post. 

During World War II Mr. Whipp served with 
the 10th Mountain Division as a rifleman in 
Italy in 1944 and 1945. Following his gradua- 
tion he accepted the appointment of Depart- 
ment of the Army civilian and was assigned 
for duty overseas. He is in charge of all post 
intramural athletic activities and is also as- 
sistant coach of the Wurzburg track and foot- 
ball teams. Whipp was a member of the boxing 
team and, in 1949, took part in the New Or- 
leans Sugar Bowl win over Michigan State's 
ringmen. He also played on the soccer team. 




SOCCER 



Maryland 2; Loyola 

ARYLAND'S soccer 
team remained unde- 
feated by virtue of a 
2-0 win over previous- 
ly unbeaten Loyola. 

Putting up a terrific 
struggle Loyola played 
Coach Doyle Royal's 
booters on even terms for most of the 
game. 

Jim Savage put Maryland ahead 1-0 
midway through the first period. Sav- 
age made good a direct kick from ten 
yards out for his third goal of a still 
young season. 

The Terp's final marker came in the 
third period when Otto Winckelman re- 
ceived a corner kick deflected off sev- 
eral players and headed the ball past 
the Loyola goalie. 

Loyola, a strong team down the 
middle, made many bids to score but 
were turned back repeatedly by the 
steady defensive play of the Royalists. 
Late in the last quarter Loyola had 
a penalty shot at Maryland's Eric Baer, 
but Baer made a sensational save to 
preserve a shutout. 

Maryland 3; Hopkins 2 

Terp booters waded through mud 
Wednesday, to defeat Hopkins, 3-2. 

The closeness of the score does not 
tell the story. Maryland decisively out- 
played the Blue Jays throughout the 
entiie contest until the final fourteen 
minutes when the Homewooders pushed 
across two goals. 

The first quarter found the Terrapins 
shooting at the goal eight times while 
their opponents took four. 

In the second quarter the Royalists 
tallied two goals on direct kicks by 
Tom Hamilton and Otto Winckleman. 
The steady play of captain Eric Baer 
was a deciding factor in holding the 
Blue Jays scoreless in the first half as 
he made five saves. 

With only two minutes of the final 
quarter gone Hamilton scored his sec- 
ond goal. 

Connecticut 4; Maryland 2 

The Terp soccer team dropped a 4-2 
mud-battle to Connecticut University, 
at Storrs, Connecticut. 

The Terps couldn't get their attack 
functioning against virtually the same 
team they licked last year, 4-2. 

Connecticut, scoring in every period, 
put steady pressure on the Terps 
throughout a bruising contest. Play 
was unusually slow due to a heavy fog. 

Maryland scored in the first period 
when Winckelman took a pass from 
Savage and drove the ball in. 

Hamilton scored his sixth goal of the 
season when he tallied unassisted in 
the third period. 

From the third period on, however, 
injuries to key players slowed down 
Maryland's attack, and Connecticut 
sewed up the game with a fourth- 
period marker. 



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Four regulars including Savage and 
Ryder were shaken up in the rugged 
contest. 

Coach Royal's parting comment on 
the do or die Southern trek was, "Just 
give us a dry field!" 

Terps Take Title 

Scoring two goals in the final half, 
one of them a penalty kick, Coach 
Royal's Maryland booters captured the 
Southern conference soccer champion- 
ship by edging the Duke Blue Devils 
at Durham, N. C, 3-2. It was the third 
straight year the Royalists had won 
the conference bunting. 



TERP HORSE TOPS 

Craven's Raven, taking three firsts 
and a second, had 12 J 2 points toward 
a championship after six of nine pony 
events were completed in the 63d Na- 
tional Horse Show held at Madison 
Square Garden. 

Owned by Sidney Gadd, III, of 
Cockeysville, Md., Craven's Raven was 
awarded firsts in the Class 67 pony 
working hunter hacks, the Class 63 
pony Corinthian hunters and in the 
Class 63 pony hunters. The second 
came in the Class 72 hacks, hunter type. 

Sidney is the son of Dr. and Mrs. 
John D. Gadd, of Catonsville, both 
Maryland alumni. 
*•**••••****• 

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[55] 



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CROSS COUNTRY 



**••••••*••*• 

PRESIDENT JOHN K. HANNAH, 

Michigan State College: — 
"The failures in life are not those 
who are unable to win the champion- 
ship medals, but only those who never 
even put on the gloves." 




Maryland 19; No. Carolina 45 

ARYLAND'S cross- 
country team ran over 
North Carolina, 19-45. 
The Terps set a new 
time record for the 
College Park course 
as three Old Liners 
eclipsed the old mark 
of 20.08. Tyson Creamer sped over the 
two-mile course in 19:36, a good half 
minute under the old record. He ran 
what coach Jim Kehoe termed "One of 
the best races I've ever seen run by 
anyone." 

Running in a tie for second place 
honors were Terps John Tibbetts and 
Al Buehler, both of whom also came 
in at 20.02, well under the old record. 
Tibbetts, who Coach Kehoe calls 
"The most improved runner on the 
campus," ran a brilliant race and it 
appears that the blond lad from Wash- 
ington will more than fill the gap left 
by Lindy Kehoe. 

North Carolina outclassed, had to 
wait until the fourth spot to break into 
the scoring column. Fourth and fifth 
places went to Jim Hemerick and Joe 
Barden of the Tarheels. 

The win over Carolina was the third 
of the season and the 29th in a row 
for the Maryland harriers. 

"Copping The Duke 

The Terps ran roughshod over Duke's 
Blue Devils for their third straight 
win of the season, 15-55. 

All eight of the men on the team 
finished ahead of the first Duke man 
as seven of the Old Liners tied for 
first place. As usual the Terps were 
paced by the speedy trio of Tyson 
Creamer, Al Beuhler and Johnny Tib- 
betts. 

In addition to these men, Bob Brown- 
ing, Kenny Thornton, Ray Horsley, and 
Don Goldstein came in ahead of the 
closest Blue Devil. Joe Swafford was 
eighth for the Terrapins. 

"The outlook for our going undefeat- 
ed looks verv bright," said Coach 
Jim Kehoe. The Duke win was the 
30th in a row chalked up by Terp 
harriers, including 26 dual meet vic- 
tories and four Southern Conference 
Championships. 

Maryland 15; Richmond 55 

The cross-country team defeated 
Richmond, 15 to 55. 

Tyson Creamer, the Old Liners' mile 
champion, ran the 4-mile course in 21 
minutes and 31 seconds. He was fully 
300 yards ahead of his nearest rival, 
Teammate Bob Browning. Ned Baylor, 
the first Spider to finish, was in eighth 
place. 



N. C. S. 39; Maryland 45 

Maryland's four year reign in South- 
ern Conference Cross Country came 
to an end when the Terps were 
defeated by North Carolina State by 
a close score of 39-45, North Carolina 
third, Duke fourth, Davidson fifth. 

State's ace distance man, Clyde Gar- 
) ison, and Tyson Creamer, Maryland's 
Southern Conference Indoor and Out- 
door mile champion tangled in a close 
battle with Garrison nosing out Cream- 
er by a very narrow margin at the tape. 
They battled nip and tuck all the way 
with both men breaking the course 
record by over 30 seconds. Maryland's 
John Tibbetts turned in the upset of 
the day when he finished third, 
ahead of many established Conference 
runners. 

Bow to N.C.S. 
After five straight dual meet wins, 
Maryland lost to powerful North Caro- 
lina State in the Southern Conference 
meet. 

The Wolfpack edged out the Old 
Liners as they placed men in the first, 
seventh, eighth, eleventh and twelfth 
positions. NCS's Garrison was first. 

Closely behind were Maryland's Ty- 
son Creamer and John Tibbetts, who 
came in second and third respectively. 
Two places behind was Al Buehler, run- 
ning fifth. 

The Conference Meet loss ended 
Maryland's consecutive win streak at 
32. This record includes five seasons in 
a row in which Coach Jim Kehoe's 
charges won all their dual meets. 

The dual meet string is still intact, 
but gone is the amazing record of Con- 
ference meet competition that the Terps 
managed to compile under Kehoe. 

This year the Terps downed Navy, 
North Carolina, Duke, Penn, and Rich- 
mond before bowing to State at the 
Durham meet. 

Outstanding performer for Maryland 
was Tyson Creamer, who had a great 
year as a senior. Creamer went unde- 
feated in dual meet competition. 
Buehler Had Best Year 
Also enjoying his best year in cross 
country was the dependable Al Buehler 
who was a steady mainstay of the har- 
rier squad. Kehoe feels that the loss of 
both Creamer and Buehler will be felt 
very heavily next year. 



**•*••••• 



• • 



ADMIRAL HENRY WILSON:— 

"Be modest winners and game losers, 
but, above all, good sportsmen." 



GOTTA HAVE SPART 

"To win games in any sport a team's 
gotta have spart," said Dizzy Dean, the 
same who coined "he slud safely into 
second." 

"Spart?", asked a newsman, "What's 
it mean? How's it spelled, "s-p-a-r-t?" 

"Spart! Spart," explained Diz, "like 
Lindbergh's plane was named, 'The 
Spart of St. Louis'!" 

• *••*••••*•*• 
JOHN FOSTER:— 

"One of the strongest characteristics 
of genius is the power of lighting its 
fire" 

*••••*•••*••• 
ERASMUS:— 
"(live me for a few years the direc- 
I on of. education and I agree to trans- 
form the world." 



[56] 



L^oiieae of- 

ARTS & 
SCIENCES 

By Frederick S. DeMarr 



Art From Mexico 

AN EXHIBITION of oils and water 
colors by Professor James P. 
Wharton was held in the Gallery of the 
Department of Art. The twenty oils 
and twenty watercolors on display re- 
flected the experiences and impressions 
of Professor Wharton during three 
months of study in Mexico. 

A variety of styles, ranging from 
conservative to experimental abstrac- 
tions, were noted among the various 
works. Professor Wharton, who is head 
of the University's Art Department, 
said the range in styles was intentional 
and that he had in mind the demonstra- 
tion value of the paintings to students. 
Much of the work was painted on 
masonite, a medium quite popular in 
Mexico today. 

Several of the paintings had definite 
social implications, while the intense 
religious zeal of the people was por- 
trayed in others. Included among the 
more conservative elements of the ex- 
hibit were still-lifes in which primitive 
sculpture and pottery recently ex- 
cavated at San Miguel de Allende was 
depicted. 

Homecoming 
Alumni of Arts and Sciences College 
met on Homecoming Day, November 3 
and were joined by a fine turn-out of 
faculty members. The program was 
highlighted by a brief talk from Dean 
Leon Perdue Smith. He described the 
establishment of an improved advisory 
service to students during the past 
two years and gave full credit for its 
success to Dr. Manning, the Assistant 
Dean, who has directed its operation. 
Three amendments to the Constitu- 
tion were passed, 1) providing for the 
election of 12 directors instead of 8, 
2) changing the term of office of direc- 
tors from 2 to 3 years, and 3) designat- 
ing that at least one of the represent- 
atives to the Council from this Chapter 
shall have served on the Council the 
preceding year. 

Elections 

Edward M. Rider who has served for 
the past year as Chairman of the 
Board of Directors, announced that it 
was impossible for him, for personal 
reasons, to accept the one-year ex- 
tension of his term which was pro- 
vided in one of the constitutional 
amendments. Therefore, the group 
elected Kenneth T. Stringer, '46, Ber- 
wyn, Maryland, to finish out Mr. Rider's 
term. The following four directors 
were elected for a full three-year 
term: Albert B. Heagy, '30, University 
Park; Temple D. Jarrell, '09, Hyatts- 
ville; Ralph G. Shure, '32, Silver 



Spring; Mrs. James H. Wharton (Mar- 
jorie E. Ruppersberger) '41, Catons- 
ville. 

William H. Press presented the re- 
port of the Program Committee, with 
3 principal recommendations. 

A. Primary objectives of Aits & 
Sciences Chapter are: 1) to encourage 
alumni of the College to support the 
Alumni Association and assist in mak- 
ing the University a finer and more 
useful institution; 2) to take leadership 
in encouraging such activities as will 
contribute to the general good of the 
College of Arts & Sciences. 

B. Progress toward obtaining these 
objectives can be made by the follow- 
ing actions: 1) a committee should be 
appointed to plan in advance participa- 
tion of Arts & Sciences alumni in the 
University Centennial program which 
will be celebrated in 1956-57. 2) We 
should encourage the establishment of 
Alumni chapters in communities where 
there are sufficient numbers of Mary- 
land alumni. 3) We should recommend 
in the very strongest terms that ade- 
quate and appropriate facilities for 
alumni be made available in College 
Park. A structure such as Rossborough 
Inn would be ideal, but if the Univer- 
sity has other plans for its use and no 
other such building is available, then 
the Alumni Association should embark 
upon a program of raising the funds 
for the construction or equipping of 
suitable facilities either on or off the 




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campus. This the committee believes 
is a basically essential necessity in any 
intelligently conceived program aimed 
at securing Alumni support. 

C. For meetings the committee sug- 
gests: 1) a brief business meeting on 
Homecoming Day. 2) That the Chapter 
concentrate on an annual gathering of 
the College of Arts and Sciences Alum- 
ni on the day of some important la- 
crosse game in the Spring. 
Directors Meet 

Following the general meeting, the 
new Board of Directors met briefly 
to elect officers for the coming year, 
as follows: Frederick S. DeMarr '49, 
Chairman; William H. Press '28, Vice- 
Chairman, and Mrs. James H. Wharton 
'41, Secretary. Loy M. Shipp, Jr. '43 
will serve as representative to the 
Council, with Mr. DeMarr and Mr. 
Press. 

In Houston, Texas 

Lieutenant Ben C. Wolman, (A & S 
'51) is stationed at Ellington Air Force 
Base, Houston, Texas. Lieutenant Wol- 
man will be remembered as manager 
of the boxing team. Referring to that 
assignment Ben writes, "Boxing taught 
me many lessons which are applicable 
to duties in the Air Force." Lieutenant 
Wolman expects to be assigned to a 
tactical outfit in the Far East. 
General Young In Korea 

Major General Robert M. Young 
(A & S '22) is stationed in Korea, and 
is in command of the Second Infantry 
Division. 

English Meeting 

Francis R. Adams, instructor in Eng- 
lish, led a panel discussion on the sub- 
ject "The Instructor Looks at Fresh- 
man English" at the fall meeting of 
the Middle Atlantic Group of the Col- 
lege English Association. The meeting 
was held at Howard University in 
Washington. 

To Play in New York 

Professor Norman Z. Wolfsohn of the 
Mathematics Department will play the 
solo piano part of the 5th Brandenburg 
Concerto of Bach at a concert, March 
14, at the Kaufman Auditorium in New 
York City. The orchestra will be a 
chamber group composed of musicians 
drawn from the Philharmonic and 
N.B.C. Orchestras, the conductor will 
be Beatrice Brown, a distinguished 
violinist and conductor. The concerto 
is for solo piano, violin, and flute with 
accompanying orchestra. The solo vio- 
linist will be Maurice Wilks of the 
Bach Society, while the flautist will be 



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Professor Ausgerissen : - "I have heard that 
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John Wummer, who played in the 
Bach festivals in France under Pablo 
Casals. 

Language Discussion 

Professor A. J. Prahl and Professor 
C. F. Kramer attended a meeting in 
Baltimore, called by Dr. Thomas Pul- 
len, superintendent of Education in 
Maryland, for the purpose of discussing 
language instruction in the secondary 
schools of the state. 

Dr. Richard H. Bauer 

The McKinley Publishing Company 
of Philadelphia announced the publica- 
tion of a "Bibliographical Guide for 
the Study of History" by Dr. Richard 
H. Bauer of the History Department, 
to appeal' first as a series in Social 
Studies and then to be printed sep- 
arately. The McKinley Company also 
published Dr. Bauer's "The Study of 
History," a guide for beginners. 
Professor Dobert 

Professor Eitel Dobert of the For- 
eign Language department is one mem- 
ber of the faculty with whom students 
become acquainted even though they 
may never meet him. His autobiog- 
raphy is in the university library. 

Born in Germany, Professor Dobert 
teaches his native language. He has 
been on the faculty since shortly after 
the last war. 

During the past year he has been 
teaching in Zurich with the Maryland 
Continuation School. 

During his stay in Zurich, Professor 
Dobert was Dean of Students of the 
University and Supervisor of the 
Junior Year Program. 

Professor Dobert said that he would 
like to see an exchange program so 
that College Park students would have 
the opportunity to study in Europe. 

He was forced to leave Germany 
during the last war because of an anti- 
Nazi book he published. He fled to 
Switzerland and came to America when 
the Nazis threatened to invade Switzer- 
land. He fought as an infantryman 
in the Rainbow Division. 

When Professor Dobert first joined 
the faculty of the University, his posi- 
tion was that of a replacement in- 
structor. Soon he decided to remain 
as a full time instructor because he 
liked the school so much. 



[58] 



Joins Air Force 

Miss Virginia S. Smith, instructor of 
Spanish in the Foreign Language De- 
partment, has joined the Women's 
Auxiliary Air Force as a First Lieu- 
tenant. She is at present stationed at 
Lackland Air Force Base, Texas. 

Language Survey 
The Department of Foreign Lan- 
guages conducted a survey of language 
instruction in the secondary schools of 
the State of Maryland. The project 
was organized on a national scale by 
the National Association of Language 
Teachers. Dr. A. J. Prahl and Pro- 
fessor C. F. Kramer are in charge of 
the Maryland survey. 

Chess Champ 

While home on vacation, Dr. Milton 
P. Jarnagin, Jr. of the mathematics 
department, won a 16-man 6-round 
Chess tournament to become the cham- 
pion of Georgia for 1951. Dr. Jarnagin 
was also the state champion of Georgia 
in 1947. 

At Bureau of Standards 

The fall meeting of the Maryland- 
District of Columbia-Virginia section of 
the Mathematical Association of Amer- 
ica was held at the National Bureau 
of Standards, Washington. Among the 
interesting talks presented was one 
entitled "A Class of Spirals" to be 
given by Professor S. B. Jackson of 
the department of mathematics. 
In Philadelphia 

Dr. R. H. Bauer, member of the 
National Council of Phi Alpha Theta, 
participated in a regional colloquium 
in Philadelphia. He presented a dis- 
cussion on opportunities for the history 
major. 

In New York 

Drs. William L. Neumann and David 
S. Sparks, assistant professors in the 
history department, appeared on the 
program of the American Historical 
Association in New York. Dr. Neu- 
mann discussed two papers dealing with 
the diplomatic service. Dr. Sparks 
participated in a session entitled 
"American History Abroad" and also 
presented Maryland's history program 
for Germany. 



IN MEXICO 



Tom Chisari, former football coach 
of St. John's, Washington, D. C, has 
been named head coach of the Ameri- 
can High School team in Mexico City 
and is whipping his team into shape 
in preparation for the season which 
starts there in February. 

Chisari, who met his Mexican wife 
while coaching at Catholic U. is a 
graduate of Maryland, '47. The Chi- 
sari's have an 18-month-old daughter. 

• •••••••••••• 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN:— 

"Time is the only money that cannot 
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[59] 



(^olieae of- 

MILITARY 
SCIENCE 



Maryland Ace Honored 

A MILITARY depot in Dayton, 
Ohio, has been renamed for the 
late Maj. Don S. Gentile, University of 
Maryland ace fighter pilot of World 
War II who died last January in a jet 
trainer crash in Prince Georges County. 

Six-year-old Don S. Gentile, Jr., 
dressed in a miniature Army uniform, 
and his mother, Mrs. Isabella A. Gentile, 
helped dedicate the depot. The major's 
parents, Mr. and Mrs. Patsy Gentile of 
Piqua, Ohio, stood by at the ceremonies. 

Maj. Gentile, who was credited with 
destroying 32 German planes, was killed 
early this year while on a routine flight 
from Andrews Air Force Base. Last 
June, his widow accepted his degree 
awarded posthumously. 

Symphony Orchestra 

A symphony orchestra composed of 
the University orchestra, non-student 
musicians from the College Park area, 
is being formed under the supervision 
of Warrant Officer Robert L. Landers, 
band director, College of Military Sci- 
ence. 

"We hope that the first concert c?n 
be presented before Christmas," said 
Landers. 

"Since the University has cancelled 
its cultural program, we feel the area 
needs its own orchestra to present local 
concerts." 

Landers cited the example of Mont- 
gomery county, Falls Church and Ar- 
lington as communities which have 
their own groups. 

Band Wins Prize 

To the tune of a jazzed up "Dark 
Town Strutters Ball" the University 
Band walked off with $200 in prize 
money, in the annual Hagerstown 
Mummers Parade Halloween night. 

There were 23 bands representing 
schools from Pennsylvania, West Vir- 
ginia, and Maryland in the contest. 

First place went to Franklin and 
Marshall of Lancaster, Pennsylvania. 
Maryland was second. 

Units were judged on appearance, 
marching, music and general effects. 

THOMAS PAINE ESSAY PRIZE 

Through the generosity of Mr. Ray- 
mond C. Baumgardner, the Thomas 
Paine Foundation is offering a $100.00 
U. S. Bond for the best essay by a col- 
lege student on "Thomas Paine and 
His Contribution to Human Freedom." 

The essay must contain a minimum 
of 2000 words, and should be sent be- 
fore January 1st to The Thomas Paine 
Foundation, 370 West 35th Street, New 
York 1, N. Y. 

The announcement of the prize-win- 
ning essay will be made on January 
15th. 



BANDS AND FLOATS 

A high-school band from Frederick 
Md., the Sigma Pi Fraternity and the 
Alpha Xi Delta Sorority won top hon- 
ors at ceremonies arranged for the 
University of Maryland's football week 
end, part of the program postponed 
from Homecoming due to inclement 
weather. 

The Frederick High School Band was 
the best of seven competing in a parade 
on the university's first "Dad's Day." 
The Northwestern High School Band 
of Hyattsville, Prince Georges county, 
was second, and the Elkton High School 
Band, third. 

Other bands competing were from 
Towson High School; Sparrows Point 
High School; Arundel High School, 
Anne Arundel county; and Roosevelt 
High School, Washington. 

Warrant Officer Charles Eidel, assist- 
ant director of the United States Air 
Force Band, and Warrant Officer Rob- 
sit L. Landers, director of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland student band, 
judged the high-school musicians. 

University of Maryland sorority 
houses were decorated for the occasion, 
and Alpha Xi Delta was awarded first 
prize for a huge "scrap book" in front 
of the house, about 12 feet high and 
8 feet wide, containing giant photos of 
campus scenes. 

The Alpha Chi Omega Sorority house 
received second prize and the Kappa 
Gamma house placed third. 

Fraternities and student organiza- 
tions entered floats in the parade. The 
Sigma Pi Fraternity was given first 
place for a float showing a group 
of University of Maryland students, 
dressed in costumes of 1919, entering a 
big replica of Baltimore's Municipal 
Stadium. 

A sign on the float said: "You may 
laugh now, but in 33 years we'll be in 
the Sugar Bowl." 

The Sigma Phi Epsilon Fraternity 
had the runner-up float with a replica 
of the old "wishing well" at College 
Park, a campus landmark. 

Phi Kappa Sigma was third with a 
float in which a band of thinly-clad 
savages surrounded a wolf which rep- 
resented the North Carolina State foot- 
ball team, known as the Wolfpack. The 
students shivered in bathing suits, with 
the temperature in the mid-forties. 

Judges for the floats and sorority 
decorations were Maj. Gen. Lindsey 
Sylvester, of Washington; Colonel H. 
O. Saunders, of Washington; Mrs. 
Robert Chaney, of College Park; J. E. 
Goldberg, of Washington, and William 
Mahoney, of the university faculty. 

Students from the university's School 
of Nursing in Baltimore entered a float 
in the parade, which was watched by 
nearly 2,000 persons. It was the first 
time Baltimore students had partic- 
ipated in a campus event of the kind. 
Awards were made at between halves 
ceremonies at the football game. 



ScLotof LAW 

By G. Kenneth Reiblich 



To Basic Training 

PVT. Mai tin B. Morrison, 24 (Law 
'51), completed processing at the 
2053d Reception Center, Fort George G. 
Meade, and has been assigned for Army 
basic training. 

Like other trainees he will receive 
16 weeks of basic military training 
necessary for all soldiers. Funda- 
mental military subjects such as close 
order drill, care of clothing and equip- 
ment, first aid, scouting and patrolling, 
and map reading will be taught. 

Individual firing of the M-l rifle, car- 
bine and light machine gun will be 
included in the battle indoctrination 
phase of the training. 

Good Shot 

Like most diplomats United States 
Ambassador David K. Bruce is a trouble- 
shooter. The Ambassador, graduate of 
the School of - Law, is also a sharp- 
shooter. At a diplomatic shoot at 
French President Vincent Auriol's sum- 
mer estate at Rambouillet, France, Mr. 
Bruce knocked down 70 pheasants. Mr. 
Auriol got only 41. 



FOR GOVERNOR? 

When asked at Salisbury if he were 
thinking of running for Governor in 
1954, Dr. H. C. Byrd, president of the 
University of Maryland, replied, "I 
wouldn't raise any objections." 

He added: 

"I would feel complimented that 
people think enough of me to want me 
to run." 

The question came up after Dr. 
Byrd's address to the Lion's Club here 
on "football." 

In his talk the college president, 
a former football coach, defended the 
sport from what he termed "foolish 
criticism." 

A few weeks ago a Maryland faculty 
member addressed a combined Kiwanis- 
Rotary meeting at Bethesda. 

After lauding the leadership at 
Maryland the speaker was asked," 
"Could Dr. Byrd fill the Governor's 
chair?" The reply was, "Many of us 
believe he could fill the Presidential 
chair." 



• * 



• • • 



****** 

DISRAELI:— 
"To be conscious thai you arc ignor- 
ant is a great st<i> in knowledge." 

[60] 



MUSIC 

Cellist Gregor Piatigorsky appeared 
with the National Symphony Orchestra 
under the direction of Howard Mitchell 
at Ritchie Coliseum. 

Piatigorsky's appearance was the 
first in a series of three Suburban Con- 
certs. They will feature the full Na- 
tional Symphony Orchestra. Concerts 
will be given January 17 and April 3. 

Theodore Pries, Silver Spring concert 
pianist, will be the soloist on the Janu- 
ary 17 program. The third and final 
concert will be a special orchestral pro- 
gram with Howard Mitchell conducting. 







MARYLAND 



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Steve C. Forris and 
Bob A. Newmark 




Belson — Honick 

l^'ORMA Belson, to Corpl. Joseph 
X^l J. Honick. 

Miss Belson attended Wilson Teach- 
eis' College. Corpl. Honick attended 
Maryland; Tau Epsilon Phi. 

Deutermann — O'Donnell 

Frances Louise Deutermann to James 
Martin O'Donnell. 

Miss Deutermann attended Wilson 
Teachers college. 

Mr. O'Donnell is attending Mary- 
land; president, Alpha Chi chapter of 
Sigma Pi, and a member of the Gate 
and Key society. 

Hamill — Schiavone 

Janice Lane Hamill to Michael Schia- 
vone. The bride-elect is a student at 
Maryland. Her fiance also attended the 
university. 

Larcombe — Kuchta 

Mary Kathleen Larcombe to Lt. Jo- 
seph D. Kuchta. 

The bride-elect attended Maryland; 
Alpha Chi Omega. 

Lt. Kuchta was graduated from 
Maryland; Alpha Zeta. 
Lee — Lahr 

Mary Lou Lee, to Richard Wells 
Lahr. 

Miss Lee is a student at the Wash- 
ington school for secretaries. 

Mr. Lahr attended Maryland. 
Lindeman — Watson 

Jean Catherine Lindeman to David 
Richard Watson. 

Miss Lindeman is a graduate of 
Maryland; Alpha Omicron Pi. Her 
fiance attends Maryland; Kappa Alpha. 
Lucker — Nelson 

Joan Marguerite Lucker to Hugh 
Berkeley Nelson. 

The bride-to-be is attending Mary- 
land; Delta Delta Delta. 

The prospective bridegroom attends 
Willamette university; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Lust — Trupp 

Regina Lust to Philip Irving Trupp. 

Mr. Trupp is attending Maryland; 
Alpha Epsilon Pi. 

Riecks — Davis 

Barbara Ann Riecks to Harry Shirley 
Davis. 

Miss Riecks will graduate from 
Maryland School of Nursing in June, 
where she is president of her class. 

Mr. Davis attended Johns Hopkins 
University. He is a graduate of Mary- 
land. 




Mrs. Roberts 



Roberts — Lumley 

Mrs. Betty McCall Roberts, Home 
Economics '23, to J. Edward Lumley of 
Baltimoi e. Mrs. Roberts is on the Ex- 
ecutive Board of the Baltimore Club of 
the University of 
Maryland Alumni, 
and has taken con- 
siderable interest in 
since its founding 
the Club's activities 
three years ago. The 
bride-to-be will con- 
tinue her career as 
director of the wom- 
en's programs at 
WCAO, the position 
she has held for 
twelve of the seven- 
teen years she has been in radio. 

Known to her many listeners as "The 
Friendly Neighbor,' she practices what 
she preaches. Her future husband is her 
next door neighbor, so Betty will be 
moving from 5112 Norwood Road to 
5114 Norwood Road, Baltimore-12. Mr. 
and Mrs. J. Edward Lumley will be at 
home to their friends after the first of 
the year. 

Stone — Foy 
Lois Stone to Allan Bernard Foy. 
The bride-elect was graduated from 
Maryland; Delta Delta Delta. Mr. Foy, 
also a Maryland graduate, is now at- 
tending the United States Coast Guard 
Academy in New London, Conn. 
Thomas — Brinker 
Nancye Louise Thomas to Hunter A. 
Brinker, Jr. 

The bride-elect attended Maryland; 
Pi Beta Phi. Mr. Brinker also was 
educated at Maryland and is now 
studying at Maryland dental school; 
Sigma Alpha Epsilon. 

Woodall — Richardson 
Diana Dorothy Woodall to Winfield 
Walter Richardson. 

Miss Woodall graduated from the 
junior college of George Washington 
university; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 
Mr. Richardson attended Maryland. 

Nursing School Marriages 
Dorothy Emma Koerner, Class 1949, 
to Mr. Edward J. DiCarlo, on January 
27, 1951. 

Marjorie deWyle Stewart, Class 
1949, to Dr. Charles Bagley, III, on 
January 30, 1951. 

Florence Floryan, Class 1947, to Mr. 
Michael J. Ostrosky, on August 5, 1950. 
Anne E. Hoffman, Class 1928, to 
Mr. Joseph Lynd, in November 1951. 

Harriett E. Smith, Class 1947, to Mr. 
John E. Goeckler, on June 30, 1951. 

Charlotte Louise Halter, Class 1948, 
to Ensign Michael Iacona, on June 9, 
1951. 

[61] 



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Bain — Jarnagin 

GERALDEAN Jarnagin and Harold 
Emerson Bain. 
Mrs. Bain attended Maryland. Her 
husband was graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Alabama. 

Bowersox — Smith 

Barbara Bing Smith, '50, Kappa 

Kappa Gamma and Phi Alpha Theta, 

to John K. Bowersox, '48, Kappa Alpha. 

Colquitt — George 

Barbara Alice George and Joseph 

Habersham Colquitt. 



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The former Miss George graduated 
from Maryland; Kappa Kappa Gamma, 
Mortar Board and Pi Delta Epsilon. 

Mr. Colquitt is an alumnus of George- 
town University. In World War II, he 
served in the U. S. Navy as a lieutenant. 

Davidson — Selecman 

Nancy Lee Selecman and Lt. Thomas 
Ferguson Davidson 2d, U.S.A. F. 

The bride was graduated from the 
women's college of the University of 
North Carolina. Lt. Davidson grad- 
uated from Maryland. 

Del Grosso — Bowman 

Marie Faye Bowman and Vincent 
Alfred Del Grosso. 

Mrs. Del Grosso attended Strayer 
business college. Mr. Del Grosso was 
graduated from Northeastern univer- 
sity and did graduate work at Mary- 
land. 

Ireland — Durham 

Patricia Sue Ireland, to William 
Gene Durham. 

Mr. Durham is a pre-medical student 
at Maryland. 

Earnshaw — Julian 

Ruth May Julian and Dr. Herbert I. 
Earnshaw. 

The bridegroom, who served over- 
seas with the Medical Department of 
the Army during World War II, attend- 
ed Maryland, was graduated from 
Georgetown University School of Den- 
tistry and is practicing in Landover 
Hills. 

Fabrizio — Fuoco 

Wilhelmina Ann Fuoco and Francis 
Vito Fabrizio. 

Mr. Fabrizio graduated from Mary- 
land. 

Jones — Miller 

Phyllis Ann Miller and Robert Legard 
Jones. 

The bride is a graduate of Union 
Memorial Hospital School of Nursing 
in Baltimore. 

The groom is a graduate of Maryland. 

Jameson — May berry 

Jeanne Barnhart Mayberry and Wil- 
liam Penn Jameson. 

Mr. Jameson graduated from Mc- 
Donough Military academy and at- 
tended Maryland; Phi Kappa Sigma. 

Lee — Sliney 

Phyllis Alice Sliney and Dr. Robert 
E. Lee. 

The wedding took place in Livorno, 
Italy. 

Mrs. Lee was graduated from Mary- 
land and the school of nursing; Alpha 
XI Delta. Dr. Lee was graduated from 
the Maryland school of dentistry; Psi 
Omega dental fraternity. 

Mees — Perkins 

Barbara Ann Perkins and Robert 
Mees. 

The former Miss Perkins is a stu- 
dent at American University. Mr. Mees 
is a student at Maryland, and a member 
of DeMolay. 

Matthews — Newman 

Annie Ives Newman to Dr. Fletcher 
B. Matthews. 

Dr. Matthews is a Graduate of Mary- 
land. 



Margrave — Felt 

Frances Elizabeth Felt to Elmer 
Margrave. 

Miss Felt attended Butler University 
in Indianapolis and Maryland. 

Mr. Margrave is a graduate of The 
Citadel. 

Mather — Dalton 
.Nancy Louise Dalton and Richard 
Increase Mather. 

Mr. Mather is on duty with the Dept. 
of the Army in Germany. Miss Dalton 
is attending the overseas branch of 
Maryland in Germany.. 

Ong — Miller 

Suzanne Adele Miller and Lt. Harry 
Ong., Jr. 

The bride graduated from the Uni- 
versity of Maryland; Delta Delta Del- 
ta. The bridegroom attended George 
Washington University; Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon. 

Robinson — Heagy 

Myrle Elizabeth Heagy and John 
Donald Robinson. 

Mr. Robinson attended Maryland be- 
fore entering the service. 
Ryer— Wulfert 

Nancy Carolyn Wulfert and David 
Eugene Ryer. 

The bride was graduated from Girls' 
Latin School and Maryland; Delta 
Gamma. 

Mr. Ryer was graduated from Wash- 
ington and Lee University; Phi Beta 
Kappa, Omicron Delta Kappa and Sig- 
ma Nu fraternities. 

Roche — Ford 

Joan B. Ford and Cornelius F. Roche. 
Mr. Roche is attending Maryland. 
Schnider — McGee 

Jean McGee and Martin Livingstone 
Schnider. 

The bride attended Maryland. The 
bridegroom attended Georgetown Uni- 
versity. 

Sheridan — Sharp 

Frieda Marie Sharp and John Sheri- 
dan. 

Her husband is a graduate of Mary- 
land. 

Wiley — Day 

Margaret Joy Day and Robert Craig 
Wiley. 

The bride is a graduate of North 
Texas State College; Nu Phi Mu. 

The groom graduated from Mary- 
land; Sigma Chi. 

Zeigler — Hirshman 

Marianne Hirshman and Robert 
Franklin Zeigler. 

The bride is a graduate of Vassar 

College. Mr. Zeigler is a grad of the 

School of Engineering of Maryland. He 

is serving with the United States Army. 

/oil in holer — Armstrong 

Margaret J. Armstrong and Second 
Lieut. Gordon W. Zollinhofer. 

The bride is a graduate of the 
Memorial Hospital School of Nursing, 
Winchester, Va. The bridegroom, a 
graduate of Maryland. 
• **•••*•*•••* 
H. L. MENCKEN 

"The way to hold a husband is to 
keep him a little bit jealous. The way 
to lose him is to keep him a little bit 
more jealous." 



[62] 




fZJne Jjfbrk ^H>et 



Nursing School Tots 

CRADUATES of Maryland's School 
of Nursing' report arrivals of 
baby Terrapins as follows: 

To Dr. and Mrs. William E. Fisher, 
a daughter, Ellen, on May 23, 1950. 
Mrs. Fisher was Nellie Scharf, Class 
1940. 

To Dr. and Mrs. William Nye Cor- 
pening, a daughter, Carol Nye, on Janu- 
ary 8, 1951. Mrs. Corpening was Avis 
Simons, Class 1944. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Zola Bauer, a son, 
David Zola, on June 18, 1950. Mrs. 
Bauer was Helen P. Viereck, Class 1946. 

To Mr. and Mrs. David F. Altimier, 
a son, on February 28, 1950. Mrs. Alti- 
mier was Nancy Lee Jones, Class 1942. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Homer Gerken, a 
son, Robert J. on April 5, 1951. Mrs. 
Gerken was Anna Ruth Logan, Class 
1946. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John J. Sheperdson, 
a daughter, Carol Ann, on March 31st, 
1951. Mrs. Shepherdson was Virginia 
June Beane, Class 1944. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Emil Hildenbrand, 
a daughter, Maria Margaret, on April 
26, 1951. Mrs. Hildenbrand was Ada L. 
Conklin, Class 1934. 

To. Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Peck, a 
son, in April 1951. Mrs. Peck was 
Eleanor April Gorke, Class 1948. 

To Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Haddenhorst, 
a daughter, Vickie Lou, on June 9, 
1951. Mrs. Haddenhorst was Marilyn 
May Collier, Class 1948. 

To Dr. and Mrs. James C. Carroll, a 
daughter, Mary Elizabeth, on May 13, 
1951. Mis. Carroll was Elaine Eliza- 
beth Fox, Class 1946. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Casper W. Kecken, 
a daughter, Linda Ann, on January 9, 
1951. Mrs. Kecken was Gloria N. Wolf- 
gang, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Francis H. Miller, 
a son, Noah Samuel, on January 2, 




MAMA KNOWS BEST 

Salesman: - "The two little coats look Rood 
on the twins. Wouldn't they like to look in the 
mirror." 

Mommy:- (H. Ec. '38) "Don't be silly! They 
never need a mirror. They just look at each 
other." 



1951. Mrs. Miller was Amy Lee DeShane, 
Class 1943. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Joseph C. Kramer, 
a daughter, Eleanor Kathleen, on Janu- 
ary 22, 1951. Mrs. Kramer was Eleanor 
T. Rogers, Class 1946. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Charles L. Carroll, 
a daughter, Catherine Louise, on Febru- 
ary 6, 1951. Mrs. Carr was Hazel E. 
McComas, Class 1946. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Andrew W. Wester- 
velt, a son, Noah Dubrow, on February 

25, 1951. Mrs. Westervelt was Betsy 
Soule Dubrow, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Raymond F. Pulaski, 
a daughter, Pamela Jane, on March 8, 
1951. Mrs. Pulaski was Betty Jane 
Houghton, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Norman L. Justice, 
a son, Robert Alvin, on April 1, 1951. 
Mrs. Justice was Dorothy May Mere- 
dith, Class 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur F. Rippel, 
twins, Robert George, and Roberta Wil- 
son, on April 15, 1951. Mrs. Rippel was 
Mabel Jane Wilson, Class 1937. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Wm. Donald Hart- 
sock, a son, Thomas Bishop, on April 

12, 1951. Mrs. Hartsock was Nancy 
Jean Franklin, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Jack E. Winder, a 
son, Norton John, on April 30, 1951. 
Mrs. Winder was Kathryn M. McCoy, 
Class 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Harold R. Corkran, 
a son, Don Kautz, on May 19, 1951. 
Mrs. Corkran was Marjorie L. Kautz, 
Class 1937. 

To Mr. and Mr. Thomas E. Pettit, a 
daughter Catherine Carol, on June 11, 
1951. Mrs. Pettit was Phyllis King, 
Class 1948. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Randall Courtney 
Cronin, a son, Randall Courtney, Jr., 
on June 23, 1951. Mrs. Cronin was 
Adeline Rosalie Mosberg, Class 1946. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Edward Joseph Di- 
Carlo, a daughter, Diane Elaine, on June 

26, 1951. Mrs. DiCarlo was Dorothy E. 
Koerner, Class 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. F. Kerger, Jr., 
a daughter, Sandra Brunehilda, on July 

13, 1951. Mrs. Kerger was Brunehilda 
Oliveria, Class 1948. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Theodore P. Taylor, 
a daughter, Sandra Lynn, on July 13, 
1951. Mrs. Taylor was Dolly Jane Cov- 
ington, Class 1948. 

To Dr. and Mrs. John E. Evans, a 
daughter, Nancy Sheppard, on July 26, 
1951. Mis. Evans was Clara Frazer 
Byerly, Class 1950. 

Another Ail-American 

Bob Ward, All-American guard on 
Maryland's undefeated football team, 
is the proud pappy of a new baby girl, 
his second child. Weight 8 pounds 5 
ounces, Mrs. Ward is the former Ellen 
Zalesak of Union, N. J., near Ward's 
home in Elizabeth. They have an 11- 
month-old son. 

Tiny Doctor 

Born to Dr. Glenn B. Poling (Den- 
tistry — 1951) and Dr. Evangeline Myers 
Poling (Medicine — 1950) on October 
28, 1951, a girl, Rebecca Anne Poling. 
Weight 6 pounds, twelve ounces, in San 
Francisco, where Dr. Glenn B. Poling 
is now a dental intern at the Marine 
Hospital. 



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Lt. Robert A. Pitts 

URIAL of Lt. Robert Axton Pitts, 
21, took place in Arlington ceme- 



B 

tery. 

Lt. Pitts was killed in a jet plane 
crash at an Arizona Air Force base. 

A graduate of Maryland in 1950, he 
entered the Air Force in that year and 
received his jet plane wings. 

In addition to his grandmother, who 
is the widow of Col. Axton, former 
chief of chaplains of the Army, Lt. 
Pitts is survived by his parents, Col. 
Frederick R. Pitts, chief of staff of 
the Fifteenth Army corps, Camp Polk, 
La., and Mrs. Pitts, and two brothers, 
Frederick R. Pitts, Jr., of Rochester, 
N. Y., and John W. Pitts. 

First Lieut. Chas. A. Hamill 
First Lt. Charles A. Hamill, sopho- 
more instructor in the University 
AFROTC program, lost his life in a 
crash of a B-25 in which he was flying 
to Denver. 

The accident occurred at Kansas 
City, Mo., when the ship which he was 
co-piloting developed engine trouble. 

Captain Edward M. Grey, piloting 
the craft, made a radio call to Fairfax 
airport asking to land because the left 
engine of the two-motored ship had 
failed. 

As the plane approached the field, 
the pilot apparently decided to cross 
the Missouri River and land at Muni- 
cipal airport at Kansas City, Kansas. 
However, the other engine developed 
trouble and the plane plunged into the 
river. 

Lt. Hamill, making the trip to visit 
his daughter, Bobby, who was seriously 
ill in Denver, was listed by the Air 
Force as making a "proficiency flight." 
He held the Distinguished Flying 
Cross and the Air Medal with five 
clusters, which he received during the 
last war. He was a bomber pilot with 
the China-Burma-India theater of op- 
erations. 

He also held a Master's degree in 
economics and was a member of Theta 
Chi fraternity. He came to the Uni- 
versity in September of 1949 to teach 
economics. 

The 32-year-old officer requested ac- 
tive duty with the Air Force unit at 
Maryland last November and was made 
a freshman instructor. 

After receiving his commission in 
1942, he served as a photo reconnais- 
sance pilot before going overseas. 
Jos. B. Himmelheber 
Joseph B. Himmelheber, 48, an archi- 
tect in Washington, D.C., for many 
years, died of pneumonia recently. 

Born in Annapolis, Mr. Himmelheber 
was graduated from Maryland's Col- 
lege of Engineering in 1923. 

He had been working on plans for 
a number of buildings at the Univer- 
sity. 

During the early 1930s he did a ser- 
ies of sketches of street scenes de- 
scribed as "Our Washington," for the 



Washington Star. Many of his draw- 
ings appeared in University publica- 
tions. 

Mr. Himmelheber was a member of 
Kappa Alpha fraternity and the Manor 
Country Club. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Marion Jackson Himmelheber; two 
sons, Apprentice Airman Joseph J. 
Himmelheber, U. S. N., now stationed 
at Jacksonville, Fla., and Dan M. of 
the home address, and three brothers 
and a sister. 

Prof. Robert H. Ruffner 

Prof. Robert H. Ruffner (Agr. '08), 
for many years associated with North 
Carolina State College, died in Salis- 
bury, N.C., while visiting his daughter, 
Mrs. Charles D. Taylor. 

Dr. Ruffner, professor of animal hus- 
bandry and dairying at State College, 
served also as head of the college's 
Animal Industry Department for many 
years prior to his retirement. He had 
received many honors in his field. 

He was born in Warrenton, Va., on 
May 22, 1882. 

Before joining the State College fac- 
ulty, Dr. Ruffner served as assistant 
quartermaster for the Isthmian Canal 
Commission, taught the first course in 
poultry science at the University of 
Maryland, was extension dairyman in 
Virginia, and held the post of assistant 
to the state veterinarian for Maryland. 
During his long service with animal 
industry at N.C.S. he supervised official 
testing of dairy cattle in the State, de- 
signed the present college dairy barns, 
and built the institution's rich grass- 
land farm. He also judged dairy shows 
throughout the Southeast. 

Dr. Ruffner was a past president of 
the Raleigh Lions Club. 

Surviving are his wife, the former 
Miss Frances Donovan of Washington, 
D.C., whom he married in 1911; two 
children, Robert F. Ruffner of Raleigh 
and Mrs. Charles D. Taylor of Salis- 
bury; one brother, Charles E. Ruffner 
of Washington, D.C.; a sister, Mrs. 
Annie Naylor of Jackson, Michigan; and. 
four grandchildren. 

After graduating from Maryland, he 
began his teaching career as asistant 
veterinarian at the Maryland Experi- 
ment Station in 1908; and served as 
dairy specialist on the Isthmian Canal 
Commission in Panama in 1909. Then 
he returned to Maryland as assistant 
professor of animal husbandry in 1910, 
serving until 1918, when he joined the 
faculty of Virginia Polytechnic Insti- 
tute as extension specialist in dairy 
husbandry. From V.P.I, he joined the 
N.C.S. faculty and had made his home 
in Raleigh since. 

Hugh C. McElroy, D.D.S. 

Dr. Hugh C. McElroy '09 (B.C.D.S.), 
of Dover, N. J., died on July 26 of a 
heart ailment shortly after admittance 
to the Dover General Hospital. A 
native of Ireland, he came to the 
B.C.D.S. from Landing, N. J., after 
finishing his predental education at 
the Centenerary Collegiate Institute of 
Hackettstown, N. J. As an under- 
graduate Dr. McElroy was treasurer 
of his class in his junior year and a 
member of Xi Psi Phi. 



[64] 



During his forty-one years of prac- 
tice in Dover, Dr. McElroy was an 
active and versatile participant in 
civic affairs. On December 31, 1949 
he had concluded thirteen years of 
service on the Dover Board of Health. 
A leading- figure in local Y.M.C.A. 
work, he was a member of the Board 
of Directors of the Morris County 
Y.M.C.A. and served for fifteen years 
as chairman of the Camp Committee 
of the county organization. He was a 
member of the Board of Directors of 
the Randolph Building and Loan Asso- 
ciation. A charter member and a Past 
President of the Dover Kiwanis Club, 
which was organized in his office, he 
had a perfect attendance record of 
twenty-one years. He was a member 
of Acacia Lodge, F.&A.M. and a Past 
Master of Stanhope Lodge. Other mem- 
berships included the I.O.O.F. and the 
Morristown Commandery. He was af- 
filiated with the selective Service Board 
of Dover during World War II as a 
dental examiner. 

Dr. McElroy is survived by his wid- 
ow, Mrs. Vera Powers McElroy, and 
two sons: Roland H., of Cincinnati, and 
Donald J., a member of the Class of 
1950, who had been associated with his 
father in the general practice of den- 
tistry at 11 East Blackwell Street in 
Dover. 

Walter C. Beaven 

Walter C. Beaven, 60, of University 
Park, Hyattsville, marketing specialist, 
died after an illness of several months. 

Mr. Beaven was for many years in 
charge of inspection of perishable com- 
modities, Department of Mai-kets, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, operated in co- 
operation with the United States De- 
partment of Agriculture. 

Born in Cecil county, he was edu- 
cated in the schools there, and was 
graduated from Dickinson College and 
the University of Maryland's Law 
School, later becoming a member of the 
State bar. 

He joined the inspection division of 
the Extension Service in 1931. 

Dr. H. Hewell Roseberry 

Dr. H. Hewell Roseberry, 47, chair- 
man of the Physics Department at 
Ohio University and member of the 
university faculty since 1937, died at 
Athens, Ohio of a cerebral hemorrhage 
as he was preparing to leave for his 
first class meeting. 

Dr. Roseberry, a native of Prescott, 
Arizona, where he was born Sept. 3, 
1904, had been away from his office for 
several days due to illness but had 
planned to resume class duties Friday. 

A graduate of the Malvern, Ark., 
High School, he earned his bachelor of 
science degree from Davidson College, 
Davidson, N. C, his master's degree 
from the University of Chicago, and 
his doctor's degree from Johns Hop- 
kins University in Baltimore, Md. 

He was an instructor in physics at 
the University of Virginia in 1926-27 
while doing graduate work there, spent 
a year as instructor in physics at 
Davidson College in 1927-28, held a 
similar position at the University of 
Maryland from 1928-36, and was pro- 



fessor of physics at the College of the 

Ozarks, Clarksville, Ark., in 1936-37. 

Capt. Warren York, USMC 

Capt. Warren York, Jr., 31, Marine 
Corps fighter pilot, was killed in action 
over Korea. 

A native of Washington and a former 
student of the University of Maryland, 
attending from 1939-1942 in the Col- 
lege of Arts & Sciences, York was com- 
missioned a pilot in the Marine Corps 
Reserve in March of 1943. He saw 
action in the Solomon Islands, Bis- 
marck Archipelago and served in Tient- 
sin and Pekin, China during World 
War II. He won two Distinguished 
Flying Crosses and six Air Medals. 

After he was relieved from active 
duty in 1946, he joined the 321st Ma- 
rine Fighter Squadron as a Reserve 
Officer at the Naval Air Station in 
Anacostia. He was recalled to active 
duty in March and served in Korea 
with the 214th Marine Fighter Squad- 
ron. 

Besides his parents, Capt. York is 
survived by his wife, the former 
Marion Vereen Moyer, of Jacksonville, 
Fla. 

Clinton R. Drach 

Clinton R. Drach, '11, suffered a fatal 
heart attack while at the wheel of his 
car in Philadelphia. He had just re- 
turned from the Homecoming week-end 
and the fortieth reunion of his class. 
He was a resident of East Lansdowne, 
Pennsylvania. Mr. Drach is survived 
by his wife, Eva M., a daughter Emely 
May, and a sister Bertha. 

Nursing School Deaths 

Mrs. Clara Margardt Reifsnider, 
Class 1893, on April 22, 1951. 

Miss Marion Little, Class 1900, in 
April 1951. 

Miss Pauline V. Mosby, Class 1901, 
in July 1951. 

Miss Helen Floy Rice, Class 1941, 
on August 24, 1951. 



JOHN H. DAVIS 
COMPANY 

Paint Contractor 

1019 G STREET, S. E. 

Phone Lincoln 3-2337 

WASHINGTON 3, D. C. 



American Disinfectant Co. 
Pest Control Service 

928 EYE STREET, N. W. 

Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 6478 



Frank M. Ewing 
Company, Inc. 

Lumber 

Millwork 

Plywood 

Rooting 

Millwork 

Wallboard 

Phone Warfield 7700 

4511 RHODE ISLAND AVE. 

Brentwood, Md. 



EXCAVATING 

In All Its Branches 

SHOVELS - CRANES 

BULLDOZERS - SCRAPERS 

"We Move The Earth" 



FREE ESTIMATES 

Phone 
GEorgia 1270 



R. E. LATIMER 
CONTRACTING CO 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



ART METAL 
FINISHING CO. 

GOLD. SILVER AND CHROMIUM 

PLATING 

ANTIQUES REPAIRED 

AND RESTORED 

923- 12th Street, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

NAtional 1326 



[65] 



FAIRHAVEN 
FARMS DAIRY 

Sykesville, Md. 

Serving 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
OF BALTIMORE 



Commercial 

Newspaper 

Printers 

MATS 
STEREOS 

• TABLOIDS 

CIRCULARS 
NEWSPAPERS 
COMPOSITION 

Phone SAratoga 6500 

BOONE PRESS 

129 W. Barre St., Baltimore, Md. 



If you cannot sell fluid milk, sepa- 
rate it and sell your cream to us. 
We will buy it year 'round. Write 
for particulars. 

Chesapeake Creameries 

INCORPORATED 

Baltimore 23, Md. 
OR CALL EDmondson 5300 



Phone MOhowk 6040 



The 
McCormick Asbestos Company 

3620 WOODLAND AVE. 

Baltimore 15, Md. 
FIBERGLAS & ASBESTOS PRODUCTS 



Some women go wrong — and men go right after them. 



WF we could go back and live our 
lives again with the knowledge that 
we now have, we might make im- 
provements. But life is constituted in 
such a way that we have to take it 
as it comes and make the most of it. 
Day by day come opportunities to make 
more of ourselves. We must grasp 
them and make them ours. 



Pulling all the teeth may not cure all 
diseases, but it will prevent people from 
talking about them. 



We get a great kick out of the Polish 
fellow in Chicago who, legally, changed 
his name from a big long one of many 
syllables to "Unprintable," because that 
is what his friends told him his name 
was in English. 



Football fans will tell you that Knute 
Rockne or some other football great 
coined the phrase, "The best defense is 
offense." So let us tell you about Com- 
mander Bowman J. McCalla, U.S.N., 
commanding the U. S. S. Marblehead 
in the Spanish-American War in 1898. 
Across the break of the quarterdeck the 
Commander had painted, in letters two 
feet high, "The best defense against 
any enemy's fire is a well directed fire 
of your own." 



It was Christmas Eve, the ground 
covered with snow. Little Elmer, brush- 
ing the frost from the window pane, 
pushed his pug nose against the glass 
and sounded off, "Gee, look Maw, the 
Phiphlebergers next door are hauling in 
the Yule log through the snow!" 

"That's not the Yule log, son," 
Mother admonished, "that's Old Man 
Phiphleberger." 



"If a Wave is a lady sailor and a Wac 
is a female soldier, what is a Wock?" 

"A wock is what a niddy boy pick up 
off de gwound and fow at a niddy wab- 
bit." 



On the Armory range. "You had bet- 
ter check up on that man. Every time 
he fires that gun, he wipes off his 
fingerprints." 



She: - "Are you in town for good?" 
He: - "No, I'm with the Terp football 
team." 



A single track mind is O. K. provided 
you have it equipped with a turn table 
every half mile. 



Mushrooms grow only in the damp. 
That's why they are shaped like um- 
brellas. 



Don't worry when you stumble. A 
worm is the only thing so low it can't 
fall down. 



Just because a fish wags its tail after 
you haul him up on a hook is no sign 
that the poor thing is happy. Those 
are dog rules. Fish rules are different 
again. 



An optimist expects to find pearls in 
his oysters. A pessimist expects pto- 
maine poisoning. 



Loyalty, like charity, begins at home. 



Never look backward unless you are 
going that way. 



It is better to speak well of people 
-even if you have to lie. 



Woman in Kentucky shot at husband 
and killed a cow. With beef as high 
as it is! 



A little opposition is necessary for 
everyone. Even kites rise against the 
wind. 



The reason no woman ever married 
the man in the moon is because he 
only makes a quarter a week, gets full 
once a month, and stays out all night. 



The motor pounded and stopped. The 
worried boy friend said to his com- 
panion: "I wonder what the knock 
could be?" 

"Maybe," she said, "it's opportunity." 



A local flagpole sitter was in a ter- 
rible predicament the other day. His 
wife died, and he had to sit at half 
mast. 



A lady was entertaining three Army- 
Air Force men at a duck dinner. She 
turned to the first airman and asked 
him what job he did. 

"I'm a pilot," he answered. 

"Very well, you shall have the 
wings!" 

"I'm one of the ground crew," said 
the second. 

"Then you shall have the legs," she 
said. 

The third said, "I'm a rear gunner. 
Just serve me vegetables." 



Summer resort: - A place where 
people go for sunshine and fresh air 
and then sit indoors and play bridge. 



During a conversation with an old 
friend he hadn't seen for some time, a 
farmer asked how he had been sleeping. 

"I sleep good nights," he said, "and 
I sleep pretty good mornings, but after- 
noons I just seem to twist and turn." 



The Queen Bee is a stubborn soul 
Who doesn't believe in birth control. 
That is why in times like these 
There are so many sons of bees. 



[G6] 



After an operation, a girl patient 
asked her doctor if the scar would show. 
"That," said the doctor, "is entirely up 
to you." 



To keep young, associate with young- 
students. To get old try keeping up 
with them. 



On a vacation the prices of accommo- 
dations approximating what you enjoy 
at home are prohibitive. 



Face powder can catch a man. It takes 
baking powder to keep him. 



Teacher: - "What is it that binds us 
together, sustains us and makes us bet- 
ter than nature intended?" 

Junior: - "Girdles." 



Picked up in a restaurant in Jackson- 
ville, N. C. 

"What kinds of pies do you have?" 
"We have three; open, shet and 
bridge; all three 'tater." 



I'apa loved Mama 
Mama loved men. 
Mama's in the graveyard. 
Papa's in the pen. 



At first he believed it to be only a 
rumor, but it turned out to be a boarder 
who ran off with Eli Whittaker's wife 
and broke up his home. Eli opines he 
could see it coming all the time but did 
not want to say anything because he used 
to be a boarder once himself. You can 
always find another wife but it's hard 
to get hold of a good boarder. The 
elopers also took Eli's Chevrolet. 
"Darned good car, too," sez Eli. 



There are many ways of preparing 
various vittles, but corn on the cob can 
be served only "a la harmonica." 



Kitty: - "The man who married her 
really got a prize." 

Kathy: - "What was it?" 



Mater: - And how did you find the 
ladies at the dance?" 

Junior: - "Just opened the door 
marked 'Ladies' and there they were!" 



Big M Guy: - "Sure, I'll indorse your 
cigarettes if you'll give me $1,000." 
Agent: - "I'll see you inhale first." 



Porter: - "Carry your bag, sir?" 
Ruffian: - "No, let her walk." 



Judge: - "On what grounds are you 
applying for a divorce?" 

Mr. Brown: - "Extravagance, your 
honor." 

Judge: - "Extravagance, how's that?" 

Mr. Brown: "She kept on buying ice 
after I had installed an electric refrig- 
erator." 



Mother: - "Melvin, are you spitting 
in the fish bowl?" 

Terp Jr.:- "No Ma, but I'm coming 
close." 



"How many students work in this 
office?" 

"About half of them." 



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THE 

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WHOLESALE FOODS 



Established ISSO 

Phone VErnon 4050 

1000-02 HILLEN ST. BALTIMORE 2, MD. 



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[67] 



CORONET 
LOUNGE 

Baltimore's Smartest Lounge 

Dancing Nightly 

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ST. PAUL at CENTER 
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BLUMENTHAL-KAHN 
ELECTRIC CO., INC. 

Electrical Construction 
Lighting Fixtures 

43 S. LIBERTY STREET 

BALTIMORE 1, MD. 



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PEERCE'S PLANTATION f 

Southern Style 
Delicious Foods • Cocktails 

Towson 5556 
7 Miles N. of Towson, Md. 

on Dulaney Valley Road 



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Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manutacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 
Baltimore 24, Md. 



Baltimore-Washington Express 
Company 

Dally Service Between 
Baltimore - Washington - Annapolis 

Lexington 1756 
1625 Ridgely Street Baltimore 30, Md. 



Van Rensselaer P. Saxe 

Consulting Engineer 

100 W. MONUMENT ST. 

Baltimore 1, Md. 



D. HARRY CHAMBERS, INC. 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Located in the Center of the Shopping District 

326 NORTH HOWARD STREET 
MU. 1990 BALTO., MD. 



A VISIT FROM ST. NICHOLAS 
By Anne Livingston 

(In the Diamondback) 

TWAS the night before Christmas 
and throughout the frats, 
Not a creature was sober — they'd killed 

all the Blatz. 
The bottles that were hid by the chimney 

with care 
Had been swiped by some pledge who 
had found they were there. 

The brethren were nestled all snug in 
their cots, 

While dreams of good booze tied their 
heads in big knots. 

John in his Frat pin and I in my cap 

Had just settled down for another night- 
cap, 

When out on the town there arose such 
a smell 



And his clothes smelled of liquor; the 

drunken old sop. 
His eyes how they twinkled, his dimples 

how merry 
His cheeks like Four Roses, his nose 

like a cherry. 
The neck of a fifth he held tight in 

his fist 
And the odor of booze covered him like 

a mist. 

A wink of his eye and a jerk of his 

head 
Soon gave me to know I had nothing 

to dread. 
He spoke not a word but went straight 

to his work 
And filled all the stockings, the 

plastered old jerk. 
And laying a cork aside of his nose 




I sprang from my chair to see what 

the hell! 
Away out the window I fell like a flash 
Stumbled o'er the shutter and broke 

through the sash. 
When what to my blood-shot eyes 

should show up, 
But eight tiny reindeer and a Senate 

beer truck. 
With a little old driver so lively and 

quick 
I knew it was Santa as tight as a tick. 

More rapid than DT's his coursers they 

came 
And he burped, and he hiccupped and 

called them by name: 
Now Gunther, now Ruppert, on Senate, 

and Blatz, 
On Old German, and Budweiser, and 

get along Pabst. 
And then in a twinkling I heard on the 

roof 
The weaving and stumbling of each tiny 

hoof. 
As I drew in my head and turned 

'round real quick 
Down the chimney he fell with a burp 

and a hick. 
He was dressed all in fur from bottom 

to top 



He gave me the razz, up the chimney 
he rose. 

He sprang to his truck, to his team 
gave a sigh 

And turning around, he burped a good- 
bye. 

But I heard him hiccup 'ere he drove 
out of sight: 

"Merry Christmas you drunkards — now 
really get tight." 



RIDING CLINIC 

The District of Columbia Committee 
of the National Section on Women's 
Athletics and the University of Mary- 
land Riding Club sponsored a program 
presented by Captain V. S. Littauer of 
Syosset, Long Island, N. Y., at Pegasus 
Stable, Chevy Chase, Md. Invitations 
were extended to teachers and pupils 
to participate in this discussion and 
practice in riding problems and pro- 
cedures. 

Captain Littauer is one of the out- 
standing teachers of riding in the 
country today. He has taught some of 
the most efficient riders in the show 
ring and has trained innumerable 
horses for hunting and showing. He 
has written numerous books on forward 
riding as well as having produced films 
on the subject. 



[«■■«] 




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1206 K Street, N.W., Washington, D. C. 



Warehouses 

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Branch 
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VOLUME XXII 
NUMBER 3 





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TERR1PIS IH THE SUGAR BOWL 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
UNDEFEATED NATIONAL CHAMPIONS 



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THE BASIC TOOLS FOR EVERY BIOCHEMICAL LABORATORY 



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ELECTROPHORESIS APPARATUS 



The large Aminco-Stem research model (left) is in- 
tended for heavy work output, using a large variety 
of sample volumes. The Aminco Portable Apparatus 
(right) is designed for routine research and clinical use 
on a smaller scale. Both models constitute complete 
electrophoresis laboratories in single, compact units. 
They combine precise schlieren optics, automatic re- 
frigeration, high-voltage supply, and rapid dialysis 
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work, adsorption chromatography, diffusion measure- 
ments, and routine clinical analysis. 

BULLETINS 2175 and 2281 



WARBURG MANOMETRIC APPARATUS 



These greatly improved instruments represent the latest 
developments in manometric apparatus. The Aminco- 
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that any manometer can be brought before the operator 
while he remains in a fixed position. Manometers may 
be read while in motion, or stopped individually. The 
Dual-shaker Apparatus (right) embodies two inde- 
pendent shaking mechanisms. Both types have wobble- 
free manometers, and are available in heated and 
refrigerated models. 

BULLETIN 2185 





LIGHT-SCATTERING APPARATUS 



HIGH-SPEED ANGLE CENTRIFUGE 




\V9* 




This compact and sensitive indicating and record- 
ing microphotometer directly measures from 20 
micromicrolumen to 20 lumens of scattered light in 
five decade ranges. It has internal electronic stabili- 
zation, built-in d-c. amplifier, removable slit and 
optical systems, and cutlet for recorder operation. 
Completely a-c. operated. 



A reliable, safe, and modern high-speed centrifuge 
with unique balancing mechanism that assures 
greater speed and safety. R.C.F. developed; 25,000 
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BULLETIN 2182 BULLETIN 150 

AMERICAN INSTRUMENT COMPANY, INC 

Scientific Instruments and Laboratory Apparatus Since 1919 



SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND 



IN METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Vol. XXIII 



March-April 1952 No. 3 

ARYLAND 

PUBLICATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY •' MARYLAND 
ALUMNI 

Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, Col- 
h?ffe Park. Md. t as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of March 3. 1879. 
$3.00 per year. Fifty cents the copy. 



M 



HARVEY L. MILLER. Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Maryland 

College Park. Md. 



MAXINE DAYTON BARKER 

Circulation Manager 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



SALLY LADIN OGDEN. Advertising Director 

3333 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
Officers 

Talbot T. Speer '17, President Miss Sarah E. Morris '24, Vice-President 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12, Vice President David L. Brigham '38. Executive Secretary 

Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE — Abram Z. Gottwals '38, J. Homer Remsberg '18, Dr. Howard L. Stier '32, Lee W. 

Adkins '42 (alternate). 
ARTS & SCIENCES— Frederick S. DeMarr 49, Loy M. Shipp. Jr. '43. William H. Press '28. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— Egbert F. Tingley '27, Talbot T. Speer '17, N. S. 

Sinclair '43. 
EDUCATION — Mrs. Florence Duke '50. Miss Joan Mattinglv '51, Donald Malev '50. 
ENGINEERING— Col. O. H. Saunders 10, S. Chester Ward '32. C. V. Koons '29. 
HOME ECONOMICS— Mrs. Mary R. Langford '26. Miss Ruth McRae '27, Mrs. Hilda Jones Nvstrom. 

DENTAL — Thomas J. Bland. Jr. '17, Arthur I. Bell '19, C. Clifton Coward '23. 
MEDICAL — Thurston R. Adams '34. John A. Wagner '38, William H. Triplett '11. 
LAW — John G. Turnbull '32, John G. Prendergast '33. G. Kenneth Reiblirh. 
NURSING — Flora Street. Pres. '38, Mrs. Eva Farley '27. June E. Geiser '47. 
PHARMACY— Francis P. Balassone '25, Morris Cooper '26, Joseph Cohen '29. 



Clubs 



BALTIMORE CLUB— Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12. 
NEW YORK CLUB— Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. 
CUMBERLAND CLUB— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
PITTSBURGH CLUB— Herbert O. Eby '32 



"M" CLUB— Joseph H. Deckman '31. 
EX-OFFICIO— Dr. H. C. Byrd 08. President. 

University of Maryland: David L. Brigham. 

'38, Exec. Sect'y., Alumni Association. 



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[1] 



iUGAR BOWL 

, ..... Yonder J 

^C TENSE, BUT RIGHT 

l ,i i '- W_i .< i I Rr.Hlo Pit Durina 



— ^^H&l 




"ONE Man Just I III1IH T Have II > It!" 

Many Men Contributed Greatly to the Building of the University. Progress, Growth 
and Development are Reflected on the Athletic Field. 



THE best speech I have heard in 
years was that delivered by Ed 
Modzelewski at New Orleans when he 
was awarded the trophy for being the 
outstanding player in the Sugar Bowl 
game with Tennessee. The Master of 
Ceremonies at the banquet for the two 
teams that evening heaped all kinds of 
encomiums on Modzelewski. When 
Modzelewski walked on the platform 
to accept the trophy and was called 
upon for "Speech!", "Speech!", he 
turned, and obviously embarrassed, 
said: "One man just couldn't have done 
it." 

That speech exemplified many ac- 
tivities and many objectives in life. 

The University 
of Maryland, like 
its football team, 
is not the product 
of one man. "One 
man just couldn't 
have done it." 

There are many 
who have con- 
tributed toward 
the development 
of the University. 
Some have provid- 
ed funds for spe- 
cific projects such 




Dr. Byrd 



as General Reckord who agreed to 
transfer $50,000 from National Guard 
funds to the University to help erect 
its Armory during the last war. 



By Dr. H. C. Byrd 

President of the 
University of Maryland 



Others have been willing to carry on 
fights in the Legislature in the inter- 
ests of the University; sometimes at 
no little cost to themselves. So, the 
University of Maryland has been built 
not by one man but by the same kind 
of unified effort that produced the win- 
ning football team against Tennessee 
on New Year's Day. 

A Victory for All 

The victory over Tennessee was not 
the product of any individual. It was 
good coaching, good players, good or- 
ganization, good administration, deter- 
mination on the part of a lot of splen- 
did young men, and a high morale 
among the student body as a whole, 
that produced that victory. And even 
beyond that, it was the feeling that 
the whole State of Maryland was be- 
hind that football team, that the team 
just could not disappoint. 

A football team can be no better, 
can have no higher morale than the 
institution and the people it repre- 
sents. A football team can be no bet- 
ter than the student body of which it 
is a part. So, the football team that 
represented not only the University of 
Maryland but the State of Maryland 



as well won from Tennessee because it 
was a part of the whole University 
and a part of the whole State of Mary- 
land. The team carried that standard 
of capacity and achievement that has 
made Maryland, though small in geo- 
graphical measurement, one of the 
great, rich states of the nation. 

What the football team accomplished 
represents something that we must, at 
all costs keep alive in America, name- 
ly, the high competitive spirit, the 
sense of loyalty to an ideal that sets 
American youth off from the youth of 
the rest of the world. That competi- 
tive spirit, breeding determination to 
succeed, is more responsible for the 
development of this nation than any 
other one cause. Perhaps, it is more 
responsible than all other causes put 
together. 

Marines Appreciate Athletes 

General Vandegrift, shortly after 
Guadalcanal, told me that no football 
player, as an officer in the Marine 
Corps, had ever let the Marine Corps 
down. General Shepherd, new comman- 
dant of the Marine Corps, said that 
the Marine Corps had no better offi- 
cers than those men that had been 
football players. 

General Liversedge of the Marine 
Corps, who recently died, and Colonel 
Lanigan, the former a California and 




TENNESSEE CHAMPIONSHIP BURIED AT FAN'S HOME 



F otos and Story, Knoxville Journal 



Tennessee's 1951 national football championship was "buried" in the 
front yard of ardent Vol supporters Dr. and Mrs.. Joseph H. Duggins of 
Knoxville, as shown at left above in the Knoxville Journal. The wreath 
is inscribed "Love, Mighty Mo and Co., 28-13." The fact that a Maryland 
alumnus. TVA Forester Spencer Chase, is handy at fashioning such wreaths 
as a sideline may be only a coincidence. The crosses bear the names of 
Tennessee players, with the biggest inscribed to "General Neyland and 
Staff." One cross marks the resting place of "The late and unlamented 
rating as No. 1 football team of 1951." Mr. and Mrs. Mort Williams and 
the Rev. and Mrs. Philip Burton also are close friends and neighbors who 
like to rib the Duggins about their ardent Volunteer support, but that. 



too, may be only coincidence. 

Neighbors of Dr. and Mrs. Duggins had the welcome shown at right above 
prepared for the couple upon their return from the Sugar Bowl at New Or- 
leans. Dr. Duggins is a University of Tennessee alumnus and among the most 
ardent Volunteer followers. The black crepe around the door, the deflated 
football and New Year's Eve balloons, the box of before-and-after press 
clippings, and the gun which was "to be used only as a last resort" — all looked 
like a not-too-eentle ribbing of the Duggins' fallen hopes after Maryland 
defeated Tennessee 28-13. Judith (left) and Trent McNeeley are the chil- 
dren of Dr. and Mrs. S. G. McNeely, neighbors and close friends of tho 
Duggins. 



[3] 




Colonel White 



Secretary Graham 



Dr. Byrd 



Colonel Pitchford 



MARYLAND TWICE TOPS DEFENSE BONDS CAMPAIGN 

The University of Maryland was awarded a Special Citation and the II. S. Treasury Minute Man 
Flag in recognition of outstanding performance in promoting the sale of U. S. Defense Bonds through 
the Payroll Savings Plan, as shown above. 

The presentation was made by Col. Roy B. White, Maryland Volunteer State Savings Bond 
Chairman, to Dr. H. C. Byrd, President of the University, at ceremonies in the Coliseum. In making 
the presentation Col. White stated that the "University of Maryland not only achieved the greatest 
percentage of increase of employee participation among the larger firms in Maryland . . . but also 
among the larger institutions of learning throughout the United States." 

John S. Graham, Assistant Secretary of the Treasury, said, "The Minute Man Flag is a true 
racognition of the community or institution which has won the right to receive it." 

Representing Secretary of Defense Lovett at the ceremony was Brigadier General G. P. Disosway, 
U. S. Air Force. In pointing out the efforts of the Air Force to meet the world situation. General 
Disosway commended the University of Maryand Air Force R.O.T.C. Program, largest and most 
complete in the country. 

Colonel John C. Pitchford, Dean of the College of Military Science, was Master of Ceremonies. 



the latter a Maryland football player, 
the two men who commanded the right 
and left wing attacking forces on Iwo 
Jima, told me that it was a mistake to 
say that the Japanese did not have 
well-planned defenses or that they did 
not have good officers. Both men 
agreed that the real victory on Iwo 
Jima came as a result of the highly 
competitive spirit, the initiative there- 
by developed, of the average American 
boy, the average American soldier. 
That is the kind of thing, that is the 
kind of attitude, that we must keep 
alive in American youth, if the future 
of this nation is to be in the hands of 
the highest type of leadership. 
Nation Founded On Competition 

The great West was opened up, oil 
fields were found and developed, min- 
eral resources were discovered, great 
business and industries are now in ex- 
istence because America is competitive 
minded. Nowhere in the world does 
the youth of any nation have opportu- 
nities for this type of development 
such as American youth have through 
our great system of competitive sports. 

Give me 100 men such as make up 
this University of Maryland football 
team, or such as make up the football 

************* 
NAPOLEON:— 
"My principal aim in the establish- 
ment of a teaching body is to have 
a means for directing political and 
moral opinions." 



teams of other universities, and I will 
whip 100 men of any other nation of 
the world in any kind of competition, 
whether it be on the athletic field or 
whether it be in the sterner game of 
life and death involved in the use of 
weapons or whether it be in the busi- 
ness or individual marts of the world. 

If I were representative of a foreign 
power and I wanted to break down the 
power of resistance of America, to 
destroy its fighting strength, its ca- 
pacity to succeed in all lines of en- 
deavor, I would try to destroy the com- 
petitive spirit and the first place that 
I would start would be to break down 
the confidence of the people in football 
and to eliminate football and other 
competitive sports. 

Nowhere do you find the opportuni- 
ties for development of the competi- 
tive spirit, nowhere do you find the 
possibilities of building a sense of 
team play and unity of purpose, such 
as you find on the football field. And 
not only are these lessons for the foot- 
ball players themselves, but they are 
splendid object lessons for the mil- 
lions who watch the games on tele- 
vision, read about them in the news- 
papers, and hear about them on the 
radio. 

Good For America 

This is what football means, this is 
what football is doing for America. 
Let us keep football, let us continue 
to develop football, let us have great 



football teams. Let us emphasize foot- 
ball, if you will, as the greatest object 
lesson both for the participants and 
spectators of that great competitive 
factor that has made America great 
and only by which America will be able 
to protect her own interests and keep 
her place of successful leadership 
among the nations and among the peo- 
ples of the world. 



Minute Man Flag 

The U. S. Treasury Department 
awarded a Minute Man Flag to the 
University of Maryland in recognition 
of a notable increase in payroll sav- 
ings purchasing of Defense Bonds. 

The proportion of the University's 
3,000 paid employees enrolled in the 
Payroll Savings Plan increased from 
9</, to 66%. This made Maryland the 
leader in payroll savings participation 
among all colleges and universities 
of its size in the United States. 

During the program the Department 
of Defense honored the University 
ROTC program, the largest and one 
of the outstanding Air Force ROTC 
installations in the nation. Maryland's 
2,500 cadets were present for the cere- 
monies. 

Addresses were made by Assistant 
Secretary of the Treasury John S. Gra- 
ham and by Brigadier General Gabriel 
T. Disosway, Director of Military 
Training for the U. S. Air Forces, who 
represented Secretary of Defense 
Lovett. 

The Minute Man Flag was presented 
to Dr. H. C. Byrd, President of the 
University, by Colonel Roy B. White, 
of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad 
and Chairman of the Maryland Sav- 
ings Bonds Advisory Committee. 

Colonel John C. Pitchford, Dean of 
the University's College of Military 
Science and Professor of Air Science 
and Tactics, was Master of Cere- 
monies. 



Baltimore Club 

Committee Chairmen and members 
appointed for the '51-'52 year are: 

Archives: 

Mahlon N. Haines, Chairman 

L. C. Burns 

Walter Bronley 

Paul R. Poffenberger 

Dean Gordon M. Cairns 
Research — Teacher Recognition : 

Dr. Albin Kuhn, Chairman 

James Outhouse 

Dr. Howard Stier 

Donald Watkins 
Memorial: 

Dr. T. B. Symons, Chairman 

Paul Nystrom 

Clayton Reynolds 
Conservation: 

Harry McDonald, Chairman 

Nevin Baker 

C. H. Anders 

J. Homer Remsberg 
Job Placement — Opportunity Service: 

Dr. A. B. Hamilton, Chairman 

Paul Mullinix 
Rosshorough Inn Redecoration : 

J. Homer Remsberg, Chairman 
Spring Rally: 

Lee Adkins, Chairman 

Roger Cohill, Vice Chairman 
**••***•****• 

EDMUND BURKE:— 

"All that is vecessary for the tri- 
umph of evil is that GOOD men do 
nothing." 



[4] 



WINTER CONVOCATION 

THE University's Winter Convoca- 
tion was in honor of the Prime Min- 
ister of The Netherlands Dr. Willem 
Drees, who was the principal speaker 
and who was awarded the degree of 
Doctor of Laws. Dr. Drees was pre- 
sented by Judge William P. Cole, Jr., 
Chairman, Board of Regents. The de- 
gree was awarded by President H. C. 
Byrd. 

The more highly developed nations 
of the world have a definite responsi- 
bility to provide aid for countries 
which still are in an undeveloped 
state, Dr. Drees declared. 

The general lack of experience in 
the field of giving aid to under- 
developed countries, the Prime Min- 
ister said, stems from the fact that in 
the past most of the more developed 
nations had colonies which were their 
own individual responsibility. 

"Now the responsibility for assist- 
ance to underdeveloped countries has 
became a world-wide and common 
one," he declared. 

"No country can remain indifferent 
to what is happening in any other part 
of the world. The world has become 
so small that upheavals in Asia have 
their repercussions in America and 
Europe." 

Technical Assistance Needed 

The solution, as Drees urged it, lies 
in providing technical assistance to the 
countries which require it. 

One aspect of technical assistance, 
he asserted, always has been the train- 
ing of foreign students who can re- 
turn to their own countries and take 
on the task of development there. 

In this connection he said the Uni- 
versity of Maryland "has built for it- 
self a reputation, acknowledged far 
beyond the borders of the State of 
Maryland and of the United States, of 
deep interest and valuable participa- 
tion in fulfilling the world tasks about 
which I made a few remarks today." 
Distinguished Guests 

Distinguished guests were His Ex- 
cellency Dr. J. H. van Roijen, Ambas- 
sador Extraordinary and Plenipotenti- 
ary; Professor E. de Vries, Head of 
Technical Assistance Affairs, Interna- 
tional Bank; Commander H. A. W. 
Goossens, Royal Netherlands Navy, 
Honorary Aide to Her Majesty the 
Queen of The Netherlands and C. 
Vreede, Chancellor of Embassy. (The 
latter is the father of two University 
of Maryland students.) 

The State Department was repre- 
sented by Carlisle P. Humelsine, 
Deputy Under Secretary of State; 
George W. Perkins, Assistant Secre- 
tary of State; Joseph W. Scott, Deputy 
Director of Swiss-Benelux Affairs, and 
James P. White, Office of Western 
European Affairs. 

The program included vocal selec- 
tions by Ellwood C. Gary, concert solo- 
ist, and Professor Harlan B. Randall. 

Music was furnished by the AF- 
ROTC band. 

The invocation and benediction were 
given by Rev. Edward L. H. Elson, 




NETHERLANDS PRIME MINISTER HONORED 



Dancgger Foto 



Dr. Willem Drees, (left) Prime Minister of The Netherlands, receives the Honorary Degree of 
Doctor of Laws, after having been presented by Judge William P. Cole, Jr., (center). Chairman ol 
the Board of Regents. The degree was awarded by Dr. H. C. Byrd, (right). President of the Univer- 
sity of Maryland. 



National Presbyterian Church. 

Washington Star Editorial 

Commending the University for hon- 
oring Dr. Drees, the Washington 
Evening Star said, editorially: 

"The University of Maryland has 
honored one of Western Europe's most 
stalwart champions of decency and 
freedom in conferring the degree of 
Doctor of Laws on William Drees, 
Prime Minister of The Netherlands. 
The Communists are said to be enraged 
more by him than by any other Dutch 
personality. That is not hard to under- 
stand. 

"After all, he has been, and still is, 
an outstanding leader of the fight 
against them — against their treason- 
able activitits, their perversion of the 
truth, their war against peace, their 
callous exploitation of human misery, 
their ceaseless effort to promote the 
Soviet slave system, and everything 
else that characterizes their monstrous 
devotion to totalitarianism. 
Long Time Fight 

"Dr. Drees has been waging this 
kind of battle for a long time. During 
the Second World War, after the Nazis 
had overrun Holland and imprisoned 
him for a year, he fought Hitler's to- 
talitarianism exceedingly well as a 
key figure in the underground of free 
men. Then, after V-E day, partly as 
a result of his distinguished service in 
co-ordinating resistance groups against 
the occupier's tyranny, he was brought 
into the government of his liberated 
land as Minister of Social Affairs. 

"In that post, with vigor and vision, 
he successfully pressed for welfare 
legislation aimed at strengthening the 
democratic way of life against those 
who would destroy it. Further, since 
becoming Prime Minister in 1948, he 
has been untiring in his effort to bring 
the full weight of The Netherlands to 



bear, through the Atlantic Pact and 
otherwise, in the common Western de- 
fense against the threat of Red Ag- 
gression and enslavement. 

"But Dr. Drees does not believe 
merely in armed defense. As he said 
in his excellent address at the Univer- 
sity of Maryland, Communist totalitar- 
ianism must be fought vigorously with 
economic and social measures as well, 
especially with technical assistance of 
a kind designed to raise the living 
standards of the world's restive under- 
developed areas. 

"His own country, as he has pointed 
out, is particularly well equipped — in 
terms of advanced techniques, over- 
seas experience and highly skilled per- 
sonnel — to join the United States and 
other Western nations in extending 
such assistance to fortify freedom 
everywhere. This is good and timely 
counsel that he has left behind him 
after his brief and infoi - mal visit 
among us." 



State Grange Master 

Mr. Edward F. 
Holter, member 
of the University 
o f Maryland's 
Board of Re- 
gents, agricul- 
tural authority 
of national and 
international rec- 
ognition, was re- 
elected Maryland 
State Grange 
Master at the 
annual con v e n- 
tion of the 
Grange in Fred- 
erick, Md. 

Mr. Holter, (Ag. 
of Middletown. 




Mr. Holter 



'21), is a resident 



[5] 



IN THE SUGAR-BOWL fi 

IRING, BEFORE AND AFTER THE BATTLE j 







mnL.ni wins national title 

Highly Favored, Unbeaten Tennessee Trounced by Terrapins. Maryland, as a State, 

Proud of Victory. Jim Tatum Tabbed as "Coach of the Year" as Baltimore Alumni 

Adds Citation. Statewide Appreciation of Sports' Objective Values. 




LLIONS of ears, trim- 
med toward radio sets 
from Coast to Coast on 
New Year's Day, took 
Maryland's convincingly 
impressive football vic- 
tory over Tennessee, 
carrying with it the 
national championship, from Sports- 
caster Harry Wismer. 

As Maryland's Ed Modzelewski con- 
tinued to unravel a scintillant display 
of offensive speed and power, which 
won for him the Warren V. Miller 
Memorial Award as the outstanding 
player of the day, Wismer asked, 
"How in the world did the AP, UP, 
INS and the others ever miss Mod- 
zelewski in their selections?" 

An Old Question 

Harry Wismer's question was one 
which followers of the Terrapin Ta- 
tumterps had been asking for some 
time. "Mighty Mo" gained more ter- 
rain all by his only than the entire Ten- 
nessee team, rated No. 1 nationally, 
amassed during a day that was to be a 
hip hip hurrah holiday for General Bob 
Neyland's Tennesseeans. Modzelewki's 
performance, on a parity with the over- 
all jobs turned in by the Terps all 
afternoon, was standard, as, for the 
entire season, Mo had gained more 
yardage than the combined teams fac- 
ing the Terps for the year. 

Experts far and wide had just about 
unanimously rated Tennessee's Hank 



By Harvey L. Miller 

Editor, "Maryland" 

Lauricella as the No. 1 boy in foot- 
ball. Hank gained exactly one yard 
against Maryland. 

"Those other teams we played all 
season," said Hank, "never got their 
ends into my backfield like Maryland 
did." 

We print the foregoing just to illu- 
strate the logic of Mr. Wismer's ques- 
tion. What are these so-called expert 
selections ? Are they made by experts 
sitting in judgment on teams and play- 
ers they have not seen in action? 

Last to Best Michigan State 

Not only did Maryland hand a king 
sized spanking to No. 1 rated Tennes- 
see, but the Terps are also the last 
team to have taken the measure of 
Michigan State, rated before the "Bat- 
tle of New Orleans," as No. 2 nation- 
ally. Tennessee gave the Terrapins far 
less opposition than they had encoun- 
tered from Navy, North Carolina and 
others. 

As the 28 to 13 score rolled into be- 
ing, Jim Tatum's steady and confident 
gridmen, unbeaten, untied and un- 
bluffed by ballyhoo and newspaper 
clippings, found themselves asking each 
other, "Is this really the nation's No. 
1 team?" Team reaction was that 
North Carolina had given the Terps a 
much better battle and that certainly 
Navy's line was superior to the for- 



ward wall presented by Tennessee. The 
Terps took it easy and won pulled up 
and going away. The statistics indi- 
cate that only in punting was Mary- 
land shaded by Tennessee, viz: — 



First d 


)\vns 




Md. 
18 


Ten ii. 
12 


Hushing 


yardage 




289 


81 


Passing 


yardage 
attempted 




62 
18 


75 
19 


Passes completed 
Passes intercepted 
Punts 


by 


7 

. . . 4 

8 


9 

1 
7 


Punting 
Fumbles 

Yards 


average 
lost 
>enalixed 





38.0 
8 
120 


43.0 

2 
20 



Tennessee was not in Maryland ter- 
ritory until midway in the second 
period, which was the season's record 
in reverse for the losers. 

Maryland grid followers who were 
sufficiently fortunate to have seen the 
Terrapins' triumph of high athletic 
achievement — the undisputed top rung 
of the national football ladder, are 
familiar with the details of the game, 
as are also those who took it via radio 
or newspaper columns. Boiled down 
for the record it went like this: — 

The Game 

FIRST PERIOD. Fullerton scored 
on 2-yard run at end of 52-yard drive. 
Decker converted. Maryland, 7; Ten- 
nessee, 0. 

SECOND PERIOD. Shemonski took 
a 6-yard pass from Fullerton for a 
touchdown after Fullerton took pitch- 
out from Scarbath. Decker converted. 
Maryland 14; Tennessee, 0. 




A SWEET TRIBUTE TO A SWEET TEAM FROM A SWEET TOWN 

Window Display In New Orleans Shows Maryland and Tennessee Players, with Campus Views. Pictured on Solid Blocks of Sugar. 



[73 



Scarbath scored on quarterback 
sneak of 1 yard to end 48-yard drive. 
Decker converted. Maryland, 21; Ten- 
nessee, 0. 

Tennessee's Rechichar took a 5-yard 
pass from Harold Payne at end of 70- 
yard drive. Rechichar's attempted 
conversion was wide. Maryland, 21; 
Tennessee, 6. 

THIRD PERIOD. Fullertan ran 46 
yards after intercepting Rechichar's 
pass. Decker converted. Maryland, 
28; Tennessee, 6. 

FOURTH PERIOD. Tennessee's 
Payne scored on a 2-yard smash as Ten- 
nessee marched 30 yards after recover- 
ing a fumble. Rechichar converted. 
Maryland, 28; Tennessee, 13. 

Maryland, subjected to 120 yards in 
penalties as against 20 imposed upon 
Tennessee, could not help but notice 
that the penalties against the Terra- 
pins always came when they were in a 
position to widen the score. These 
breaks against them were also brushed 
aside by Jim Tatum's lads. They were 
champions! Champions always behave 
like champions when the chips are 
down. 

Terps Took Over 

Years ago James P. Randall sat 
down near New Orleans to write 
"Maryland, My Maryland," a tribute 
in song to a great State, one of the 
original 13. On New Year's Day, 1952, 
the composer would not have felt quite 
so nostalgic, as Maryland pretty well 
took over in the Bayou country. 

Prior to the game it had been vari- 
ously promulgated that the Tennessee 
system responsible for the Volunteers' 
No. 1 rating consisted of playing 
steady ball, waiting for the opposition 
to make mistakes and then collecting 
on such mistakes. It's a good system 
if it works. However, the cockroach 
in the omega oil raised its ugly head 
when the Tatumterps unwrapped an 
aggregation which did not make the 
anticipated mistakes. 

"There is glory enough for all," is 
an old quote that well applies to the 
Terp victory at New Orleans, since the 
team played as a team, each aiding 
the other. Only good leadership pro- 
duces such teams. The Terps had it. 

Alderton, the most unsung player in 
the season's 9-game winning streak, 
performed like the greatest of grid- 
greats at New Orleans. Every time 
Tennessee threatened to get back into 
the game it was Alderton who made a 
key tackle and forced the Vols to punt. 

Tennessee was not accustomed to be- 
ing outplayed on the line as they 
were. Maletsky and Kensler at guards, 
and Martine, Cianelli and Fullerton as 
backers-up did magnificent jobs. 

Terrific Support 

Mighty Mo pounded out his tremen- 
dous yardage with terriffic' support 
from the Terps' All-America Bob 
Ward, who opened the holes by bowling 
over the opposing linemen. 

Scarbath had tricks that Tennessee 
obviously has not seen from another 
split-T quarterback. In the first half, 
at the end of which Maryland led, 21-6, 
•Tack completed seven out of eight 



passes. 

Bill Meek, Kansas State coach, re- 
marked, "That was the first time Ten- 
nessee faced two great ends in Aider- 
ton and Nestor." 

Yes, there was glory enough for all, 
including the youngsters and relative 
"unknowns" who did not even expect 
to play but who, Tatum-style, got their 
chance. When those kids got into the 
fray and continued the amassing of 
yardage, it brought a groan from 
a rabid Tennesseean, "Now look what 
they're doin' to us. That's a ball club 
fo' danged sho'!" 

Good Loser 

General Bob Neyland, Tennessee 
coach, said, "Maryland is the greatest 
football team the Volunteers ever 
faced." It should be noted that Ney- 
land's opinion was voiced before the 
game. 

"Until now I have always thought 
Frank Leahy's Boston College team 
that whipped us here in 1941 was the 
best I ever saw. Now from what I can 
see and hear of Maryland, I have to 
revise my estimate," he stated. 

The General added, "I also think 
they are greater than Howard Jones' 
powerful Southern California team 
that beat us, 14-0, in the Rose Bowl 
of 1940. 

"This Maryland club has everything 
— tremendous size and speed, good re- 
serves and a lot of versatility," he 
went on to say. 

"Scarbath is a tremendous ball hand- 
ler and field general. Every man in 
the offensive backfield can pass. Mod- 
zelewski is a 210-pound fullback who 
is hard to stop. 

"To our mind, Maryland is without 
question the finest team in the coun- 
try, one of the best of all times," the 
Tennessee coach concluded. 

After the game General Neyland 
said, "We were soundly trounced by a 
superior team. I congratulate Jim 
Tatum and his men." 

False Haruspices 

The Tennessee coach's tribute stands 
up right smartly against the comment 
of a mid-Western big shot coach who 
predicted, "Maryland is a highly over 
rated team. Their bubble will burst 
************* 
THE END OF A WALTZ 

<Tn the Tune, of 28 to 13) 

THEY'D referred to our schedule 
As "The Tennessee Waltz" 
While opponents we smeared one by 

one. 
Wc were top dog, they told us, 
And then those Terp terrors, 
Showed the world that our waltzing 

was done. 
We remember the day, 
Down New Orleans way, 
We were champions, happy and gay, 
The experts had told us 
We were sho' 'nuf tops 
When the Terps stole our football away. 
We remember the day 
And the Sugar Bowl play 
Where wc learned even experts have 

faults, 
It was down in New Orleans, 
Those Terrapins stopped 
The Beautiful Tennessee Waltz. 



in the Sugar Bowl." The predicted 
burst turned out to be an explosion — 
but all over the lot. Two well known 
Southern coaches, both ex-Maryland, 
tabbed Tennessee to win. 

Few Were Correct 
Relatively few picked the Terps to 
win. Fewer still picked them to win 
as they pleased. This column does 
not profess claim to reputation at grid 
prognostication. However, we did en- 
joy the benefit of seeing the Tatum 
crew in action. Because the value of 
team play can be appreciated by any- 
one with average powers of observa- 
tion and a bit of athletic or military 
background, we thought, against Mary- 
land, that North Carolina, Navy and 
North Carolina State, tossed in really 
good opposition and that Maryland, a 
team that beat them, could not be 
taken by Tennessee. That strictly off 
of comparative records. After the fire- 
works die down (Maryland rooters 
actually took pyrotechnical supplies to 
New Orleans with no intention what- 
ever of tossing them into the Father 
of Waters) everybody likes to hop 
aboard the bandwagon. That's natural. 
Before the game there were plenty of 
empty seats on the w.k. vehicle. We 
filled one with pre-game prediction 
on page 38 of the last issue of 'MARY- 
LAND,' namely, to wit, i.e., as follows, 
e.g., colon and dash, although we also 
like that "viz", 

"Many who saw Coach Jim Tatum's talented 
brigade 'do what they wanted to' against such 
stubborn and courageous opposition as that 
afforded by North Carolina State and West 
Virginia, or against the valiant all-out efforts 
of such great outfits as L. S. U., Navy, and 
Missouri and, particularly, the team work that 
routed the season's toughest opposition and took 
a lot of the spirit right out of North Carolina, 
are of the opinion that the Terrapins are the 
best ball team in the country and that they do 
not deserve to be rated under Tennessee. 
Michigan State or any other aggregation any 
more than they deserve to be sniped at by dis- 
tant critics. If Tennessee has a day such as 
saw Vanderbilt's Billy Wade set the Vols on 
their heels to barely win, 35-27, and Maryland 
unpeels a game like the Terps' job against 
N. C. S. the sugar from the Crescent City's 
famed saccharine container is going to be 
loaded on the buckboard labeled 'To College 
Park'." 

Statewide Appreciation 

The objective values of the Sugar 
Bowl victory of the football team are 
being highly appreciated these days 
not only by University of Maryland 
folk but by just about all who point 
proudly to the name "MARYLAND", 
whether it designates the State or the 
the University. 

One prominent Marylander opined, 
"This win did more to put the State 
on the map than Francis Scott Key's 
composition of the 'Star Spangled 
Banner'." That's spreading it on lib- 
erally, but reflects the value of foot- 
ball performance far beyond the play- 
ing field. 

In the premise of objective sports 
values the most inspiring figure has 
been Maryland's President, Dr. H. C. 
Byrd. Typical were his between halves 
remarks before the 84,000 in the Sugar 
Bowl and out over the air to the mil- 
lions of listeners. President Byrd 
stressed that what really counted was 
that such great sports spectacles are 
a part of the web and woof that made 
this nation great and that they should 



[8] 



not be disturbed. He emphasized that 
it made little difference which team 
won or lost, that sports were but a 
means to an end toward building' the 
citizenry and the leadership that has 
contributed tremendously toward mak- 
ing our country great. 

Of significance is also the fact that 
all of the recent suggestions for safe 
and sane administration of sports pro- 
grams in institutions of learning list 
certain procedures which have been in 
operation at Maryland for years. 

Standing Policy 

It should be noted that Dr. Byrd's 
tributes to sports values were almost 
verbatim the same after the Sugar 
Bowl win as they were for many, many 
years prior thereto. His "feet on the 
ground," horse sense policy, including 
sports competition as a part of the 
highest missions of college educations, 
is one after which others might well 
pattern to the benefit of the nation and 
its schools. 

The post game tributes crowning the 
victorious Terps were quite natural. 
However, of greater importance in the 
premise of support and confidence, was 
the Touchdown Club's selection of Jim 
Tatum as Coach of the Year, an honor 
accorded Big Jim before the Sugar 
Bowl win. 

Tatum is the first Washington area 
college football coach to receive this 
honor. He was conceded much credit 
by TD Clubmen for Maryland's rise 
to national recognition as an unbeaten, 
untied football power, and for keeping 
big time college football alive in the 
Washington Area. 

Ward and Modzelewski 

The T.D. clubmen also voted the 
Knute Rockne Memorial trophy saluting 
the leading college lineman of the year 
to Bob Ward and, to Ed Modzelewski a 
citation as the outstanding single per- 
formance of the year because of his 
shattering attack against Tennessee's 
line in the Sugar Bowl. The presenta- 
tion to the Maryland star was made by 
F. Joseph Donohue, Commissioner of 
the District of Columbia. 

Former Notre Dame stars Rip Miller 
and Elmer Layden made the presen- 
tations. Later, in Philadelphia the 
sports writers awarded the "lineman of 
the year" trophy to Bob Ward. 

At the Sheraton-Belvedere the Uni- 
versity's Baltimore alumni accorded 
rousing homage to Maryland's head 
coach and his team at a football din- 
ner, as they presented Jim with a Dis- 
tinguished Service Citation. In accept- 
ing this great honor Tatum remarked, 
with becoming modesty, "Please do not 
forget that all I did in New Orleans 
was just sit on the bench." 

That was the nice thing — the right 
thing — to say. However, Maryland 
alumni know and deeply appreciate 
what goes into making the score board 
read like it did way down yonder in 
New Orleans. Recruitment, training, 
scholastic qualifications, coaching, 
practice, morale, the knack of leader- 
ship and acquistion of a staff of quali- 
fied assistants, all of it backed and 
supported by an administrative policy 



and top flight leadership without which 
sugar bowls are just items of equip- 
ment for breakfast tables. 

"Jim, we believe you're the world's 
best coach at the world's best institu- 
tion of learning," said Edgar W. Mon- 
tell, of the Class of 1915, as the alumni 
award was presented Tatum of a Dis- 
tinguished Service Citation by the Uni- 
versity of Maryland Club of Baltimore. 

"Almost twoscore years ago, I had 
the privilege of serving under and be- 
ing trained in sports by a man with 
dynamic personality," said Mr. Montell 
'15 (Agric), Vice-President and Gen- 
eral Manager of Campbell's Soup Com- 
pany, who was selected to make the 
presentation and came from his home 
in Riverton, N. J. for that purpose. 
"He became a hero to me, and never 
since has anything occurred that has 
dimmed my respect or admiration. I 
refer, of course, to the incomparable 
Dr. Byrd, whom we know affectionately 
as 'Curley'. 

Trained Them Right 

"Curley had the ability to pick and 
train men," Mr. Montell continued, 
"and no one came within the orbit of 
his personality without retaining some 
of his enthusiasm and determination. 
I believe every athlete he trained is a 
better man today because of contact 
with Curley Byrd. 

"Things learned on the athletic field 
do not come from books," Mr. Montell 
continued. "Many's the time after that 
third lap in the mile race, when I'd 
glance at a competitor and say to 
myself, 'That guy's as tired as I am,' 
and bear down a little harder, and the 
next thing I knew maybe I'd win a 
race. Don't think that lesson hasn't 
helped me on many a third lap since I 
left college. 

"We kept on thinking that Dr. Byrd 
wouldn't forsake his first love, foot- 
ball," continued the speaker, "and sure 
enough, when the proper time came 
and he had searched the country for 
the best, he applied that magnetic 
charm and convinced this great coach 
that there was an opportunity to fame. 
The 'magic of believing' must have 
consumed our great Jim Tatum be- 
cause he's here. 

"Here again we have a man who 
builds character, guts and the will to 
win in the youngsters who are pre- 
paring for their life's work," Mr. Mon- 
tell went on to say. "I believe each 

OH! TENNESSEE 

(Tune — "Oh! Susanna") 

I come from Maryland, wid a football 
ov my knee, 

I'm gvine to Louisiana, to tackle Ten- 
nessee. 

It rained all night de day I left, de 
weather it icas dry, 

De sun so hot I froze to death, Ten- 
nessee, don't cry. 

Oh! Oh! Tennessee, don't you cry for 

me, ■ 
I'm gain' back to Maryland, a sugar 

hotel on my knee. 

[9] 



and every one, as the years go by, will 
say that the course which did moBl to 
help him win a battle was conducted 
on the athletic field. 

"'Maryland. My Maryland,'" Mr, 
Montell concluded, "is on many lips 
these days and this scroll, from the 
Alumni of Baltimore, is a small me- 
mento given as a reminder that we 
are also filled with the 'magic of be- 
lieving' that you are the world's besl 
coach at the world's best institution of 
learning." 

Augmenting his remark anent "jusl 
sitting on the bench," Tatum added, 
"Jack Scarbath passed the bench and 
I told him 'Jack, throw a pass and 
keep the ball at the same place.' 

" 'We got it all figured out,' Jack re- 
plied," Tatum continued, " 'Mo is going 
to run for a touchdown.' Mo did just 
that and we scored. There were no 
more suggestions from the bench," 
Tatum added. 

Judge Cole 

Judge William P. Cole, chairman of 
the University's Board of Regents, 
told the Maryland coach that "Curley 
Byrd's promise to you of a lifetime job, 
still must be approved by the board of 
regents." 

Then, added Judge Cole, "I suspect 
Curley will get away with that with- 
out much difficulty." 

President H. C. Byrd said, "That 
lifetime promise continues, but with 
one provision, "It will always require 
the hardest kind of work during that 
lifetime." 

The Scroll 

The scroll — "for services rendered" 
drafted by James 0. Proctor and Dr. 
B. Olive Cole, and presented by Edgar 
Montell for the Baltimore Club read: 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 
ALUMNI CLUH OF HALTIMORK 
Distinguished Service Citation 
in tribute to 
JAMES M. TATUM 
Head roach and Director of Athletics for the 
University of Maryland for the hist four years. 
As a member of the University staff during 
these years. James M. Tatum has guided the 
University of Maryland into a position of 
national leadership in the field of football. 

In addition to his outstanding coaching ac- 
tivities and achievements at Maryland during 
recent years, James M. Tatum has long main- 
tained a position of national prominence in 
college athletics. 

As a result of his sound leadership and 
loyal devotion to clean sportsmanship, James 
M. Tatum has made another distinct contribu- 
tion in creating a bond of understanding, co- 
operation and appreciation between the vari- 
ous colleges of the University of Maryland 
and citizens of this state and nation. 

We congratulate and salute James M. Tatum 
for his leadership, his kindly disposition, and 
above all, his tireless devotion to the task of 
training men at the University of Maryland. 

Proffered in open meeting by the University 
of Maryland Alumni Club of Baltimore at 
their Annual Dinner Meeting on January It',, 
1952 held at the Sheraton Belvedere Hotel in 
Baltimore. Maryland. 

Be it Resolved Therefore : 

That the above be spread upon the perma- 
nent records of the University of Maryland 
Alumni Club of Baltimore and a special ropy 
be presented to Mr. James M. Tatum. 

ALBERT E. GOLDSTEIN 

President 
CHARLES W. SYLVESTER 

1st Vice President 
JOHN C. KRANTZ 

2nd Vice Presidenl 
WILLIAM J. O'DONNKI.I. 

3rd Vice Presidenl 
JAMES (). PROCTOR 
Secretary-Ti easurer 
James (). Proctor, Secretary-Treas- 
urer of the Baltimore Club and a most 
enthusiastic alumnus, was responsible 
for a magnificent charcoal drawing — 




GENERAL ALUMNI COUNCIL FOR 1952 

Front Row. Left to Right : Dr. Howard L. Stier '32, Col. O. H. Saunders "10 ; S. Chester Ward '32, Morris L. Cooper '26. Mrs. Florence 
G. Turnbull '32, C. V. Koons '29, Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12 (Vice-President). Dr. C. Adam Bock '22. Miss Beatrice Y. Jarrett '34, Mrs. 
Miss Flora Street '38. 

Second Row. L"ft to Ri(*ht : Lee W. Adkins '42, Ford Loker '36, Miss Ruth McRae '27, Miss Joan Mattingly '51, Mrs. Mary R. Langford '26. Mrs. Hilda 
Jones Mystrom '32. Mr. Duke, Dr. William H. Triplett '11, G. Kenneth Reiblich. Dr. Thomas J. Bland, Jr. '17. 

Back Row, Standing: Egbert F. Tingley '27, Talbot T. Speer '17 (President), Miss Sarah E. Morris '24 (Vice-President). 
DeMarr '49, Dr. Thurston R. Adams '34, Dr. John A. Wagner '38. J. Gilbert Prendergast '33. Dr. Arthur 1. Bell '19, Norman S. Sinclair 
Gottwals '38. and David L. Brigham (Secretary). 

Council Members Not Present: J. Homer Remsherg '18, Loy M. Shipp, Jr. '43. William H. Press '28. Donald Maley '50. Miss June E. Geiser '47: 
Francis P. Ballassone '45, Joseph Cohen '29, Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. Joseph H. Decktnan '31. Herbert O. F.by '32, and Dr. H. C. Byrd '08. 



Duke '50. John 
Eva Darley '27. 



Frederick S. 
43, Abram Z. 



larger than "Big Jim" himself, and a 
perfect likeness — which was done by 
G. Edward Griefzu, Vice-Principal of 
the Edison Vocational School in Balti- 
more. The drawing, which dominated 
the entire ballroom, was presented to 
Mrs. Tatum "to keep her company 
while 'Jim' is away on his various and 
sundry trips across the nation." 

The evening's entertainment came to 
a close with dancing to the strains of 
old Maryland tunes under the direction 
of Gil Monroe. 

The Committee 

Dr. Arthur I. Bell, Program Chair- 
man, was assisted by Dr. Charles W. 
Sylvester, Dr. John C. Krantz, William 
J. O'Donnell, James O. Proctor, James 
E. Swartz, Brooks Bradley, Talbot T. 
Speer, Dr. L. W. Bimestefer, John R. 
Mitchell, Arthur Van Reuth, Betty 
McCall Lumley, William C. Rogers, 
Sr., Dr. Thurston R. Adams, Lorraine 
C. Neel, Dr. B. Olive Cole, James W. 
Stevens, Beatrice Jarrett, Dr. Conrad 
Inman, Sr., Mason C. Albrittain, 
James L. Benson, Dr. Charles W. Max- 
son, Arthur P. Dunnigan, John L. Mc- 
Kewen, Ethel Troy, and Charles Aus- 
tin. 

Repeatedly, during the season and 
since his scintillant conclusion, Dr. 
Byrd has highly lauded Coach Tatum's 
leadership and ability, stressing par- 
ticularly his high qualifications as an 
organizer. 

So Coach Tatum sat on the bench at 
New Orleans? From that vantage 
point he could see Scarbath dropping 
hack to display a variety of attack 
while Maryland receivers got out into 
Tennessee territory or blocked out the 
stars of the Volunteer team. Particu- 
larly Big Jim could see the openings 
made by a smart team for Mighty Mo 



to plunge through and, even more par- 
ticularly, he could see Bobby Ward 
get off in high gear to hit Tennessee's 
great Daffer harder than he's ever been 
banged before. Yes, Big Jim could sit 
on the bench ONLY BECAUSE THE 
JOB OF COACHING HE AND HIS 
ASSISTANTS HAD TURNED IN 
MADE THAT BENCH A MOST EN- 
JOYABLE SPOT ON WHICH TO SIT. 
From there he could see unfold the re- 
sults of his handiwork, one of the 
greatest coaching jobs in the history of 
the gridiron, here or elsewhere. 

Sharing honors with the coach at the 
testimonial dinner was Mrs. Tatum, 
described by Dr. Albert E. Goldstein, 
president of the Baltimore alumni 
group, as knowing "more about foot- 
ball than Jim ever thought of know- 
ing." 

Baltimore Ad Club 

The Baltimore Ad Club also tossed a 
luncheon party at which its members 
paid tribute to the Maryland team by 
a full scale turnout at the Emerson. 

Dr. Byrd, as the feature speaker, 
once again called attention to the over- 
all values of athletic activities that re- 
flect favorably upon the State and the 
University. TV commentator Bailey 
Goss and others had some very fine 



THIS MAKES SENSE 
A friend of ours, who knows sports 
values but is confused by opinions to 
the effect that Maryland does not have 
clear claim to the national football 
title, comes up with this sage observa- 
tion, "Tennessee was champ in every- 
body's book. Maryland knocked out the 
champ. That makes Maryland the 
champ and all the opinions and type in 
the world ain't gonna unsell anybody." 



things to say in augmentation, indi- 
cating that, from coast to coast, Mary- 
landers are pointing with pride to 
"their" football team. 

"It is 'our' team," said Goss, who 
knows his football, "from 'our' Univer- 
sity and 'our' State and, along with 
many other fine assets the win bears 
the good old stamp 'Maryland'." 

Dr. Byrd's address before the Ad Club 
appears as the leading article in these 
pages. 

In turning the Sugar Bowl trophy 
over to the Student Government Asso- 
ciation, President Byrd repeated an 
observation he had made in the ad- 
dress to the Baltimore Ad Club: "I am 
here to present the trophy won on New 
Year's Day ... I don't think there is 
any speech as appropriate to this occa- 
sion as the one Ed Modzelewski made 
at New Orleans when he was awarded 
the trophy as outstanding player in 
the game. He stated simply, 'One man 
just couldn't have done it'." 

Dr. Byrd continued, "That one sen- 
tence exemplifies all we try to do at 
the University in athletics activities, 
and in scholastics. No man achieved 
more than his friends helped him to 
do, no football team can rise to greater 
heights than the school it represents. 
This cup represents the high standards 
set by the student body." 

O'Conor's Coonskin Cap 

Senator Kefauver (D-Tenn.) surren- 
dered his politically famed coonskin 
cap to Senator O'Conor (D-Md.) as a 
result of Maryland's win. 

For good measure Kefauver threw in 
a live coon in acknowledging that 
Maryland on her New Year's Day was 
the "best team" he had ever seen. 



[10] 



O'Conor, after receiving the cap and 
trying it on, promptly presented it to 
the University. He indicated also that 
he would present the coon to the Bal- 
timore zoo. 

The cap and coon were offered after 
O'Conor had promised to give Kefau- 
ver a barrel of Maryland oysters if 
Tennessee won. 

Mo' and Mo' Regarding Mo. 

Following the honors heaped upon 
him for his performance in the Sugar 
Bowl, Mighty Mo Modzelewski starred 
in the North's 20-6 victory over the 
South in the Senior Bowl game at 
Mobile. He bucked the yardage that 
made for the TD's. With typical 
Maryland-taught precision he faked 
"team" plays. The South's team went 
for Mo and the North went for the TD. 

Later Mo came up in the first round 
of the draft, being tagged by the 
Pittsburgh Steelers. Mo, who wants 
an Air Force commission, has some 
credits to make up over the coming 
year and does not figure to draw his 
sheepskin in June. He has decided to 
play for a year with the Steelers. 

Others drafted by Professional Foot- 
ball were Ed Kensler by the Washing- 
ton Redskins and Dave Cianelli by the 
New York Yankees. 

Three players drafted by profes- 
sional teams intend to play another 
year for Maryland. 

Paul Nestor, Tom Cosgrove and Bill 
Maletzky plan to put in another at 
college. 

They lack the credits needed to grad- 
uate in June '52. 

The Cleveland Browns picked Cos- 
grove and Maletzky and the Chicago 
Bears chose onto Nestor. 

In the meantime Cianelli has stated 
that he is not interested in pro football 
and intends to work for Remington- 
Rand while Bob Ward will be coaching 
next year — at Maryland. 

'52 Schedule 

Maryland's '52 schedule thus far 
consists of nine games (6 away and 3 
at home). The Southern Conference 
rhubarb, which engulfed the Terps 
prior to the Sugar Bowl title victory, 
wiped Washington & Lee, West Vir- 
ginia, North Carolina State, North 
Carolina and George Washington off 
of the Tatumterps '52 agenda. Since 
these schools were also slated for '53 
some of the boys in the back room are 
wondering who was smart when Mary- 
land got the needle. 

The new names on the Maryland 
slate are not exactly Class "D", viz: — 

Sept. 20— -Missouri *Oct. 25 — L. S. U. 

Sept. 27— Auburn Nov. 1— Boston U. 

*Oct. 4 — Clemson Nov. S Open 

Oct. 11 — Georgia Nov. 15 — Mississippi 

*Oct. 18 — Navy Nov. 22 — Alabama 

'Home games at College Park. 



A.A.U.P. 

At Catholic University members of 
the University of Maryland Chapter of 
A.A.U.P. attended the first of a series 
of lectures sponsored by the Chapters 
of A.A.U.P. in Washington and Mary- 
land. The speaker was Dr. Brien Tier- 
ney, Cambridge, England. 




CAR FOR DAVE 



Dancgger Foto 



President Talbot T. Speer. Alumni President, hands title to new Plymouth car to Alumni 
Secretary David M. Brigham. in appreciation of the latter's efforts for the association. 
At the left is Ward Barnett. Jr.. of Anacostia Motors. 
At thte right is President Abraham Z. Gottwals of the Agriculture Alumni Association. 



WELL EARNED AWARD 

Dave Brigham Presented With 
New Automobile 

AT the end of a recent Alumni 
Council meeting, President Talbot 
T. Speer asked Secretary Dave Brigham 
to withdraw, as the President had 
something personal to discuss with the 
members of the Alumni Council. 

When Mr. Brigham had withdrawn, 
Mr. Speer stated that it had been called 
to his attention that Mr. Brigham had 
an automobile which had gone 143,000 
miles, a great portion of which had 
been driven in the interest of the 
Alumni Association and that he felt, 
with the fine work that the Secretary 
had done, the Association should give 
him a contribution towards a new car, 
which with the allowance on his old 
car, would give him a new Plymouth. 

The ensuing discussion disclosed en- 
thusiastic approval and President 
Speer was authorized to notify Brig- 
ham of this show of appreciation of 
excellent work. 

Highly Appreciated 

"I can only say," said Brigham, 
"that as I am blessed with the 
strength, and with the continued sup- 
port, activity and encouragement of 
the alumni, we will grow until no 
Alumni Association is our peer." 

"Many Alumni will be as much 
amazed to read this news as I was 
to find myself the center of the story. 
Few, however, ever experienced the 
emotional reaction which was mine 
when I was recalled to a meeting of 
the General Alumni Council on Janu- 
ary 11, to learn I had been given a 
new Plymouth bv the Alumni Associ- 



ation. 

"During my five years as your Sec- 
retary," Brigham continued, "I have 
asked of my little office team only 
three essentials — integrity, loyalty and 
energy. Only one close to them can 
know how many extra hours they have 
worked to assure the successful pro- 
gress of our Association. This great 
tribute belongs more to them, to Presi- 
dent H. C. Byrd and the Board of 
Regents for their constant assistance, 
support and consideration, to Colonel 
Harvey L. Miller, an experienced maga- 
zine publisher and managing editor, 
for his editorship of 'MARYLAND,' 
and to the many, many alumni who 
have served on the Alumni Council, 
Boards and Committees. I can't thank 
each and all enough. 

"My sincere thanks also to the Ana- 
costia Motor Company of Washington 
which made the car available at even 
less than cost. 

Old Cherry Seeder 

"Capt. Carlsen," Brigham went on 
to say, "lost the Flying Enterprise 
after an epic struggle. I feel much tbe 
same as I part with my old cream and 
tan 'Cherry Seeder,' which covered 
125,000 miles with me in my work and 
became quite a tradition in alumni 
circles. My new 'ship' however, will 
enable me to do a better job. 

"I am lost," Dave concluded, "for an 
adequate expression of all that is in 
my heart. I can only hope that fu- 
ture efforts will prove me worthy of 
this highly appreciated award." 
*•••••*•••••■* 

SHAKESPEARE:— 

"Ignorance is the curse of God; 
knowledge the wing wherewith ice tiy 
to heaven." 



[11] 



MARYLAND SMALL FRY 

Edna B. McNaughton's Pupils Range from Two to 

Five Years of Age 



By Pat Scanlan 

DOWN in "Stuttering Gulch" (the 
group of temporary buildings on 
the southwestern end of the campus), 
there's a new sound heard above the 
general hum of college noises. It is 
the patter of little feet. 

The little feet belong to the young- 
sters, aged two through five, who at- 
tend the University's nursery school 
and kindergarten. 
The school left 
its former quarters 
in Building HH for 
larger, better facili- 
ties in BB, a little 
closer to the main 
campus. Here 
rooms are com- 
pletely equipped to 
handle the different 
age levels. 

More than just a 
well equipped and 
staffed institution, however, the Uni- 
versity nursery school is the demon- 
stration center for the 230 women en- 
rolled in nursery school education. 
They represent the largest group in 
the College of Education, being over a 
third of the registration. The number 
of students majoring in nursery school 
training increases every year. This 
year approximately 55 of them will 
graduate, with more than enough jobs 
waiting for them when they get out. 

Almost every day the school receives 
a call asking for a teacher or student 
teacher trained in nursery school edu- 
cation. 




Miss Scanlan 



Miss Edna B. McNaughton, director 
of the school, considers childhood edu- 
cation "a newer type of women's edu- 
cation," in which coeds at Maryland 
get their regular Americanization pro- 
gram with specialization in the study 
and care of children. 

The school is also an observation 
center for other groups giving work 
on the study of children, such as psy- 
chology, sociology, and human devel- 
opment. 

Enrollment 60 

There are now 60 children enrolled 
in the school, but it could, and should, 
handle more, according to Miss Mc- 
Naughton. More groups of children 
would give the college students better 
experience, and would also help relieve 
the great shortage of pre-school facili- 
ties in this area. More children would 
mean more space, and Miss McNaugh- 
ton hopes the time is not too distant 
when the school can expand and utilize 
its potentialities. 

There are two groups each of four- 
and five-year olds attending the school, 
one of each g'roup' meeting in the 
morning from 9-11:30 A. M., and the 
other in the afternoon, from 12 AS- 
CIIS P. M. The two-year olds meet on 
Tuesday and Thursday mornings; the 
three-year olds, Monday, Wednesday, 
and Friday mornings. Three full-time 
and six part-time teachers handle these 
classes, with the help of college stu- 
dents. 

In the new building there is one 
loom for the two- and three-year olds, 
where the chairs and tables seem to be 
almost toy-size. Over in the corner is 





CHILDHOOD EDUCATION 

"A newer type of women's education." .... "Today the nursery school is the working model for 
the State of Maryland. Kvcn its present expanded facilities cannot accommodate the great demand 
for its services." 



HEADS NURSERY SCHOOL 

Miss Edna B. McNaughton, Professor, Nur- 
sery School and Kindergarten Education. 

a rocking boat for the more adven- 
turous spirits. Everywhere in the room 
there is play equipment for the child 
Often it is home-made. An orange 
crate becomes a cupboard and a vege- 
table pan is transformed into a sink 
basin. Budding artists can daub away 
at handy easels. 

Everything is clean and brightly 
painted. And after the last child has 
left, everything is usually neatly in 
place again. 

Two other rooms are generally the 
same, although the size of the tables 
and chairs is larger, and the equip- 
ment becomes more adapted to the ol- 
der child. These are the rooms for the 
four- and five-year olds. The drinking 
fountain, designed for pint-sized hu- 
mans, is a long stretch for the average 
grown-up, especially the high-heeled 
species. 

Observation Rooms 

The two observation rooms are the 
pride of the new school. Here the chil- 
dren can be watched while they are 
virtually unaware of observers. These 
rooms, so important in studying the 
spontaneous behavior of children, 
were lacking in the old building. Even 
now they are not ideally soundproof 
and invisible to the children, but it is 
felt that the darkened screens and a 
quiet group of observers will be scarce- 
ly noticed by the younger generation 
at play. 

The rooms for the older children 
contain, in addition to the usual play- 
things, children's records and picture 
books. There are also ironing boards, 
real carpenter sets, including a saw, 
vise, and hammer, and trains. Blocks 
and other wooden construction toys are 
ail over the rooms. 

Visitors usually become alarmed 
when they see that four-and five-year 
olds are allowed to use tools, but Miss 
McNaughton says there have been no 
mishaps yet. The children are care- 
fully watched by teachers and college 
students. 

All the young pupils bring rugs to 
school. They can rest in class and get 



[12] 



away with it, because that's what 
they're supposed to do. They also 
snack daily on fruit juice and crack- 
ers, unless it's someone's birthday. 
Then the respective parent supplies 
cookies for the occasion. The teachers 
turned thumbs down on cupcakes. "Too 
messy," they explained. 

A large lecture room is used as an 
indoor play area. Here the children 
gather for their games when the 
weather is too bad to go outside. It 
contains a piano for accompaniment 
and a rabbit in his cage that seems to 
be the children's favorite. 

In good weather, there is a large 
fenced off area, where the children 
have their swings and sliding boards. 
This is where they give their wilder 
instincts free rein. 

The building also contains offices, a 
meeting room, and a library for col- 
lege students and parents. 
New Location 

The new location in BB is a far cry 
from the site of the first University of 
Maryland nursery school. That first 
experimental school for children got 
its start in the home management 
house, in March, 1934, operating only 
until September, while the house was 
not used by college students. 

That fall it moved to the Home Eco- 
nomics Building, now housing Geogra- 
phy, where classes were held in the 
basement. When the Works Progress 
Administration funds halted, the school 
ceased functioning. During 1942-45, 
classes observed in nearby nursery 
schools. 

In 1946, nursery school education 
became separate from the College of 
Home Economics, and today is in the 
College of Education. Early in the 
school year classes were held in near- 
by homes until HH was completed in 
the spring. Here the school remained 
until its move this year. 

It could rightly be said that Miss 
McNaughton developed the childhood 
education program at Maryland. She 
started teaching child development, 
which was originally under Home Eco- 
nomics, after finishing her under- 
graduate work at Michigan State Col- 
lege. While at Maryland she was 
awarded a Laura Spellman Rockefeller 
fellowship, and left the University for 
a year to study at Columbia Univer- 
sity, the University of Minnesota, and 
the Merrill-Palmer School in Detroit, 
the "parent" nursery school. 
A Model 

Today the nursery school is the 
working model for the State of Mary- 
land. Even it» present expanded fa- 
cilities cannot accommodate the great 
demand for its services, however. 
There is a waiting list of over 300 
children whose parents wish them en- 
rolled in the University pre-school 
classes. Women trained in the school 
are too few to meet the increasing 
needs of the area. 

With the public's widening accept- 
ance of pre-school training for the 
• **•*••*•*••• 
TALLEYRAND:— 

"Man was given a tongue to dis- 
semble thought." 



child, and with the growing recruit- 
ment of women into the defense effort, 
the need for pre-schools and teachers is 
acute in Maryland. Only three coun- 
ties provide free kindergarten educa- 
tion. There are only about 75 nursery 
schools in the University's radius, cov- 
ering a population second only to Bal- 
timore in the state. This is a small 
number, considering the total number 
of children aged two through five, and 
the small enrollment of each school. 

Recently the Children's Bureau of 
the federal government stated the seri- 
ious need for day-care nurseries, pro- 
viding care for the working mother's 
children. Miss McNaughton explained 
that the University school does not 
now have the facilities for such a pro- 
gram, but that she is "hoping for a 
day care center in the future." 

Such a center would give the student 
teachers experience in children's naps 
and lunches, among other things. The 
College of Home Economics would 
handle the food plannning, enabling 
its students to study and practice child 
nutrition. 

A Class for Adults 

To help meet this situation, the Uni- 
versity his inaugurated a class for 
people interested in setting up cooper- 
ative nursery schools. Under the di- 
rection of Mrs. Annie McCune of Sil- 
ver Spring, a former nursery school 
teacher at the Washington Child Re- 
search Center, a group of about 15 
parents and teachers meet once a week 
to learn about or improve methods of 
teaching in a cooperative nursery 
school. 

In this area, a cooperative school is 
one supported by a group of parents 
who furnish the housing and the 
money to pay for teachers and equip- 
ment. The cooperative is usually in a 
church or apartment, or in a parent's 
home, if the parent is the teacher. 
The parents maintain the building and 
handle administrative matters in the 
school, with the teacher's guidance. 

The parents often work together in 
building needed equipment. They also 
sponsor fund-raising drives to buy such 
things as children's records and books, 
professional play equipment, or fur- 
nishings needed in the school. 
Mothers Present 

Under many cooperative systems in 
this area, one or more mothers is pres- 
ent each day to assist the teacher. 

All the problems encountered by 
communities interested in setting up 
cooperatives are studied by Mrs. Mc- 
Clune's group. Meeting at the Uni- 
versity's nursery school every Wednes- 
day night, the parents and teachers 
discuss not only administrative prob- 
lems, but also the techniques of teach- 
ing the pre-school age child. 

One of the ever present demands on 
the cooperative movement is that of 
maintaining professional standards in 
its methods. Too often the nursery 
school, especially the one designed for 
working mothers, runs the risk of be- 
coming little more than a place to park 
*•••••■*•**•••* 

ABRAHAM LINCOLN:— 
"Ait educated man is never poor." 

[13] 



the child for the day. 
Under the professional guidance oi 

Mrs. McCune, with all the facilities of 
the University's modern nursery 
school at its disposal, the class trains 
in the best modern methods. At least 
twice during the 18-week course, which 
is a three-unit, graduate level class, 
the parents and teachers who comprise 
the class observe cooperative nurser- 
ies similar to those they hope to 
teach, and also nurseries different 
from their type, such as schools for 
special or problem pre-school age chil- 
dren. 

The class also uses the University's 
observation rooms to watch the three 
classes at Maryland. During the course 
each person plans to prepare a project 
on some pertinent subject, such as 
selecting an inexpensive pamphlet 
library for the parents of nursery 
school children, or means of stimulat- 
ing parent participation. 

This is the first time the State of 
Maryland, through the University, has 
attempted such a program. It is hoped 
that some members of the class will 
go on to start cooperatives in then- 
areas. 

Discussion Group 

A parents' discussion group, headed 
by Mrs. Louise Yuill, meets to discuss 
problems encountered by the parents 
in rearing their children. This is in 
addition to the regular nursery school 
and kindergarten Parent-Teachers As- 
sociation. 

To get a look at children in action, 
nurses from the University nursing 
school in Baltimore journey down to 
College Park twice a week. At the 
school, they observe the youngsters to 
gain a greater understanding of how 
to handle them successfully in the hos- 
pital. 

In turn, women majoring in nursery 
school education learn about the med- 
ical aspects of child care by spending 
a week in the University's nursing 
school. Here they receive information 
and practical experience, including 
bathing a baby. 

"The Art of Eloquence" 

A new book, "The Art of Eloquence", 
made its debut in January. The re- 
views have been most favorable and 
we are proud to mention the fact that 
both the author and co-author are 
graduates of the University of Mary- 
land, Dr. John C. Krantz, Graduate 
School of '28, and the Honorable Theo- 
dore R. McKeldin, Law '25, Governor 
of Maryland. 

Dr. Krantz, Vice-President of the 
University of Maryland Alumni Club 
of Baltimore, has among his recent 
accomplishments the planning of the 
series of television programs presented 
by the Baltimore Schools every Tues- 
day evening (10:30-11:00 P. M.) over 
WBAL-TV. These programs are be- 
ing received most enthusiastically by 
a vast audience and are drawing much 
favorable comment. 
• •*•****••••* 

HERBERT:— 

"Stej> after step the ladder is 
ascended." 



EMOTIONAL UPSET IN ATHLETES 




IT IS common knowledge that emo- 
tional upset can interfere with a 
good athlete's performance. It is also 
common knowledge that failure to 
undergo a certain amount of emotional 
excitation before a contest — that is, 
failure to be "up"— can cause a fine 
team or individual to perform far below 
par. Certainly many championships 
have hinged upon 
whether or not a 
coach could get his 
team emotionally 
"right" for competi- 
tion. 

Research in psy- 
chology and physical 
education of recent 
years has shed a 
considerable amount 
of light upon the 
Dr. Johnson problem of emotional 

stress. This informa- 
tion, gathered in laboratories, war 
zones and sports fields, should be of 
considerable value to coaches in their 
efforts to understand athletes and what 
makes them tick ; certain of this in- 
formation can be used to improve effi- 
ciency in competition. 

To begin with, we should understand 
that strongly emotional behavior can- 
not be "willed" away by the individual 
suffering it. The entire mind-body or- 
ganism is involved in emotion, and 
once a condition of intense anxiety or 
fear is established in a boy, it is futile 
to instruct him to "get hold" of him- 
self. Furthermore, when a pattern of 
emotional response in a particular kind 
of situation is established, it can no 
more be dissipated or disposed of by 
"willing" than can a well established 
motor learning. 

Complications 

The problem is further complicated by 
the fact that different strong emotions 
have quite different somatic aspects; 
and once an emotion is well initiated 
its bodily machinery is not easily inter- 
rupted or restored to normal. What we 
know as rage and fear, for example, 
have quite different neurological and 
endocrine counterparts.* Fear is a con- 
dition in which the sympathetic nervous 
system and the adrenal medulla are 
dominant. In cases of extreme panic 
these neural and hormonal factors may 
so flood the system that movement is 
literally impossible. 

On the other hand, as anger ap- 
proaches rage, the parasympathetic 
nervous system and probably cortin 
(adrenal cortex) so flood the system 
that violent action is almost inevitable. 
However, such action is aimless as it 
is extravagant. 

Also characteristic of intense emotion 
— and this is perhaps most important — 

* Sec M. Arnold, "Physiological Differentiation of Emo- 
tional States," I'viehological Review, 1945, 52:35-48. 

•* For an interesting explanation of this phenomenon, 
tee Jean-Paul Sartre The Emotion* Y V.: Philosophical 
Library, I94R. 



Athletics Provide Unique 

Field For Research In 

Human Emotion 

By Dr. Warren R. Johnson 

College of Physical Education, Recreation 
and Health 

(Printed by Perminaion of the Athletic Journal) 

is the fact that thinking ability declines 
to the vanishing point as the emotion 
mounts.** In consequence, an athlete 
who is ordinarily capable of wise move- 
ments and tactical insight may, under 
emotional stress, become mechanical 
in his performance. He may be ob- 
served to lose his ingenuity and to 
behave in a stereotyped manner; he is 
no longer a "smart" athlete. 

Sophomores Erratic 

Perhaps the most erratic of varsity 
performers are the sophomores in 
their first season of competition on a 
school team. Their excitement often 
becomes so great that in spite of 
the fact that they may move with 
great speed and display exceptional 
strength, their judgments are often 
bad and their nicer coordinations are 
"off." They may shift away from holes 
that are being opened for them, and 
they may often be expected to fumble 
the ball when it is in their hands. Al- 
though there are of course some great 
sophomore performers, the general pic- 
ture is one which we may identify as 
domination by the parasympathetic 
nervous system. 

Neophyte athletes in such combative 
sports as wrestling and boxing are fre- 
quently seen to display another type 
of behavior. Although many wrestlers 
and boxers become highly excited be- 
fore competition, much more commonly 
than team athletes these men may enter 
a state of depression before competi- 
tion. Mild warm up activities may seem 
very fatiguing to them; satisfactory 
breathing may actually require un- 
pleasant effort. Heart beats may be- 
come surprisingly slow or rapid but 
light. These men often become pale 
and drawn looking, and their speech 
may be strained and unnatural. These 
are common symptoms of sympathico- 
adrenal domination.*** 

Champions 

What can we say about the emotional 
reactions of champions ? It would be 
convenient to announce that champions 
do not undergo extremes of emotional- 
ity, that they are not plagued with the 
disorganizing effects of stress. Such, 
however, is not the case. Although 
many champions are exceptionally calm 
(at least in appearance!) many report 
excruciating emotional distress as com- 
petition approaches. Champions evi- 

*** Adrenin has traditionally been conceived to he a bodily 
Stimulant. Research, however, seems to have forced its re- 
classification as a depressant when viewed in relation to 
physical performance. See .!. Rogoff, "A Critique on the 
Theory of the Emergency Function of the Adrenal Glands," 
Journal of General Pstichohyu, 1945, :12: 249-1268. 

[14] 



dently experience everything from 
breathlessness to nausea, "butterflies," 
anxiety and fear. However, most top 
performers say that they experience re- 
lief once they get into action; the emo- 
tion is presumably given necessary 
physical expression in gross activity 
and the men are thus free to concen- 
trate upon the contest. 

Even Champions Get Jitters 

Judging from what we know of 
human emotion, it seems safe to say 
that even though champions may suffer 
from emotional upset, when the time 
comes for action their organisms under- 
go a coordinated adjustment which en- 
courages maximum performance. Stud- 
ies by such people as Darling indicate 
that individuals who are tempera- 
mentally well fitted for action are not 
inordinately dominated by either the 
sympathetic or parasympathetic ner- 
vous systems or their endocrine counter- 
parts (adrenergic vs. cholinergic ad- 
justments).**** On the contrary „ in 
the well adjusted arousal for action, the 
one system or the other evidently leads 
off at the outset of emotional excitation, 
but instead of being permitted to inun- 
date the body it is quickly balanced by 
innervation from the other branch of 
the autonomic system. Studies by the 
present writer have tended to indicate 
that top performers, even when re- 
porting upset, do not register extremes 
of measurable emotional disturbance 
that are seen in less well adjusted 
athletes. The writer has further found 
that when varsity athletes give their 
better performances, their excitation 
is not extremely high or low. These 
findings led to the hypothesis that there 
is a range of pre-competitive emotion- 
ality below which or above which opti- 
mal performance cannot be expected. 

Some Old "Pros" 

Colonel Harvey L. Miller, of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland, who has spent 
over 52 years in boxing at all levels, 
cites three outstanding examples of pre- 
contest emotional excitement — or lack 
of it — by three of boxing's greatest 
world champions. 

"Jack Dempsey," says Miller, "a 
great 'fighter' with the killer instinct 
paramount from bell to bell always 
registered nervous emotions before a 
bout. A boxer regarded by experts as 
being of the 'fearless' type, Dempsey's 
voice, before a bout, would be highly 
pitched. He'd pace the floor of the 
dressing room. In retrospect Dempsey 
says, 'I was afraid. Don't let anybody 
tell you they weren't afraid before a 
bout.' " 

On the other hand, Miller points out, 
Ad Wolgast, at the time only 19 years 
of age, had to be awakened from a 
sound sleep to enter the ring against 
Battling Nelson, the greatest 'distance 

**** R. Darling, "Autonomic Action in Relation to Person* 
ality Traits of Children." J. of Abnormal and Social Pxycholo- 
</!/ "1940. 35: 24r.-2fiO. 



boxer' ever known, for a 45-round 
championship bout which Wolgast won 
in 40 rounds of gruelling action. 

Similarly, Joe Louis, prior to his 
bout with Max Baer, the threshold to 
one of the greatest careers in boxing 
history, also was sound asleep on a 
dressing room table before entering 
the ring. 

Assuming certain important consti- 
tutional advantages — neurologically 
speaking — of the "born" athlete, he, like 
his less gifted team mates is in need 
of coaching guidance which will mini- 
mize psychological hazards to optimal 
competitive performance. The follow- 
ing considerations are a few that seem 
pertinent to this aspect of effective 
coaching. 

Individual Guidance 

Human emotion is not thoroughly 
understood; one thing that is certain 
about it, however, is that people are 
not alike in terms of their emotional 
responses to given stimuli. In giving 
attention to the various implications 
of the emotional upset of his team, the 
coach should avoid prescribing for the 
group except in very general terms. 
His recommendations for diet and rest, 
and his efforts towards calming or 
"pepping up" his team should be on an 
individual basis. (The one exception 
to this individualization is when the 
coach tries to take advantage of the 
infectious nature of excitement and 
arouse a lethargic team as a whole. 
More often than not, however, some 
members of the team will be "up" and 
in need of quieting while others are 
"down" and in need of stimulation.) 
One coach who is generally accepted as 
being one of the nation's greatest is 
reputed to hire his coaching staff mem- 
bers more in terms of their ability to 
appeal to players of different tempera- 
ments and draw the best from them, 
than in terms of their prestige as sports 
technicians. 

Intensity of the Emotional State 
When an emotion is in its early 
stages it is "reversible"; that is, it is 
amenable to quieting. The wise coach 
will anticipate crises and work to pre- 
vent too great emotional upset by build- 
ing confidence in his boys; by providing 
them broad competitive experience; by 
being alert for extraordinary emotion- 
ality due to the sport or extrinsic fac- 
tors; and by teaching a realistic philoso- 
phy of winning, losing and competing. 
Beyond a critical point the strong 
emotions seem to gain momentum and 
become irreversible; the problem is the 
more difficult since, as we have already 
pointed out, it is impossible to appeal 
to the reason of an emotionally dis- 
traught person. 

Emotional Upset and Learning 

Here again the incompatibility of 
emotional stress and learning ability 
becomes evident. It is futile to attempt 
to teach new skills or strategies to 
emotionally upset individuals. This is 
especially true of athletes in combative 
sports. It is pointless to attempt to 
teach most of these athletes immedi- 
ately before or perhaps, in some cases, 
even as much as a couple of days be- 



fore contests. It is indicative that more 
than one combative sport athlete who 
was also a World War II veteran has 
described his pre-contest anxiety as 
being comparable to his pre-invasion 
anxiety in war time. 

Perfection of Skills 

If in practice athletes can so perfect 
their movements that they make "right" 
moves without conscious direction, they 
can hope to compensate for at least 
some of the handicap imposed by ex- 
cessive emotionality. Perfection of 
skills, like superb bodily conditioning, 
is in itself an important factor in that 
building of confidence which helps to 
hold the emotions in check. Naturally, 
a man cannot be at his actual peak un- 
less he has the services of his highest 
mental processes. 

Diet 

Cannon's experiments with cats dem- 
onstrated that such emotions as fear 
and anxiety cause abrupt stoppage of 
the mechanics of digestion. This phe- 
nomenon has been observed in man as 
well. It has also been demonstrated 
that individuals vary markedly as to 
how much and how long digestion is 
retarded in emotional states — indeed, 
they vary as to the kinds of emotion 
that will cause such stoppage. Conse- 
quently, although one athlete may safe- 
ly eat a meal two hours before a tough 
contest, another may find it necessary 
to eat not less than five to six hours 
before the contest in order not to suffer 
in efficiency. Choice of foods in rela- 
tion to how easily they are digested by 
specific individuals is also an important 
factor in the problem of selection of 
a training diet. 

Relaxation 

The limits of the human body's ca- 
pacities to perform work are not known. 
When pressed for survival or when 
otherwise highly motivated men have 
accomplished feats of strength and en- 
durance that are difficult to believe. 
In sports it seems logical to suppose 
that body reserves of energy can cope 
with virtually any reasonable demands 
made upon them. 

Often times competitors are unable 
to rest and sleep properly during the 
days or hours before contests. During 
this period of anticipation and worry 
the muscles tend to be in a state of 
tension and the circulatory organs may 
be hyperactive. Rest and sleep may 
become virtually impossible. Even after 
very severe cases of such disturbance, 
however, some athletes are able to win 
national championships; but most ath- 
letes tend to feel physically drawn and 
psychologically exhausted before con- 
test time. 

Experienced coaches attempt to com- 
bat this tension effect with a variety 
of recreational activities. Reading and 
study furnish adequate distraction for 
some, but the majority of young men 
seem to profit most by some form of 
social activity which provides an action 
outlet for their tension and forces their 
attention away from their anxiety. 
Table games, mild sports such as table 
tennis, etc., and early evening or after- 
noon dancing are often found quite 
useful. Movies are popular pie-contest 



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diversions, but they can be surprisingly 
enervating and are undoubtedly detri- 
mental to many athletes. 

This discussion has endeavored to 
raise and explore the problem of emo- 
tional upset in the athlete rather than 
to solve it. Lynde Steckle has com- 
mented that man is essentially an 
emotional creature rather than a ra- 
tional one — and education will never 
be successful until this fact is taken 
into account.* 

The athletic sports situation pro- 
vides a unique opportunity for research 
in human emotion. In the schools one 
can rarely find comparable intensely 
emotionalized living under conditions 
subject to scrutiny and potentially to 
control. As techniques are formulated 
for helping young people to handle their 
emotions, these can be tried out under 
the real pressures of the competitive 
situation. If coaches can teach their 
athletes means of controlling the power- 
ful emotions which arise under con- 
ditions of stress, they will not only im- 
prove their chances of turning out 
champions, but will also contribute im- 
measurably to their boys' ability to 
master themselves — and their lives. 



* L. (". Steckle, ProWems of Human Adjustment. X. Y.: 

Harper and Brothers Publishers, 1949. 



[15] 



». tf 




SONS OF B.C.D.S. GRADUATES 

Front Row: l.aui-r. Fine. Silber. Gale. Feindt, Richmond. Second Row: LeBar. Haymond, Jackson, Martin. Gaines, Tyler, Adkins. 

Third Row: McBrayer. Walker, R. Mitchell, J. Mitchell, Page, Hightstein. 



School of- 

DENTISTRY 

By Dr. Joseph Biddix, Jr., '34 
and Gardner P. H. Foley 



Re-Union In New Jersey 

By Saul M. Gale 

THE New Jersey Alumni Associa- 
tion of the Baltimore College of 
Dental Surgery, Dental School Univer- 
sity of Maryland, will hold its annual 
meeting and dinner at the Robert 
Treat Hotel in Newark on Wednesday, 
March 26th, 1952. Clinic starts 
promptly at 3:30 P. M. Clinician 
Lewis Fox, D.D.S., '27 U. of M. 

Cocktails at 5 P. M. 

Dinner at 6 P. M. 

The guest speaker will be Dr. Arthur 
I. Bell, '19, at 8 P. M. 

Mail in your reservation now. 
Sons of Alumni 

The fine spirit of loyalty shown by 
the alumni towards their alma mater 
throughout the history of the B.C.D.S. 
is graphically demonstrated by the im- 
pressive fact that the present student 
body contains 26 sons of alumni: 8 
freshmen; 4 sophomores; 7 juniors; 
and 7 seniors. The roster presented 
below lists the sons and their fathers, 
with the designation of the Class of 
each. 

Class of 1952: Zeno L. Edwards, Jr. 
(Zeno L. Edwards— U. of M. 1918); 
Norman Hightstein (Charles Hight- 
stein, deceased— U. of M. 1921); Ed- 
gar M. LaBar, Jr. (Edgar M. LaBar — 
U. of M. 1919); Franklin E. Martin 
(Dailey M. Martin— B.C.D.S. 1914); 
Richard T. Mitchell (Joseph S. Mitchell 
— U. of M. 1914); Edward W. Roberts 
(Charles B. Roberts— B.C.D.S. 1900); 
John A. Walker (Carlos A. Walker — 
U. of M. 1912). 

Class of 1953: William 0. Adkins 
(Lester O. Adkins— U. of M. 1924); 
Hall H. Haymond Jr. (Hall H. Hay- 
mond— B.M.C. 1911); Oscar D. Jack- 
son (Robert W. Jackson — U. of M. 



1900); William F. McBrayer (Matthew 
McBrayer— B.M.C. 1912); Joseph S. 
Mitchell, Jr. (Joseph S. Mitchell— 
U. of M. 1914); Charles L. Page, Jr. 
(Charles L. Page— B.C.D.S. 1915); 
Charles V. Wahlberg, Jr. (Charles V. 
Wahlberg— U. of M. 1916). 

Class of 1954: William B. Crowl 
(William N. Crowl— B.C.D.S. 1917;); 
Dorsey E. Gaines, Jr. (Dorsey E. Gaines 
— U. of M. 1919); John L. Richmond 
(Selma L. Richmond, deceased — U. of 
M. 1923); Robert J. Tyler (John E. Ty- 
ler— B.C.D.S. 1917). 

Class of 1955: Henry W. Feindt 
(William Feindt— U. of M. 1916); 
Mark L. Fine (Harry Fine— B.C.D.S. 
1919); Norman C. S. Gale (Saul M. 
Gale— U. of M. 1922); Ronald M. 
Lauer (Louis Lauer '27); James T. Mc- 
Carl (James W. McCarl '24); William 
F. Martin, Jr. (William F. Martin— 
U. of M. 1916); George D. Resh, Jr. 
(George D. Resh '25); Harold L. Sil- 
ber (Samuel E. Silber '29). 

In addition to these sons of alumni 
there are 13 students who are sons of 
graduates of other dental schools: 
Thomas A. Clary '55 (Austin J. Clary 
—Buffalo 1925); Robert L. Wiener '55 
(Benjamin E. Wiener — Columbia 
1918); Russell L. Chapman '54 
(Charles L. Chapman — Marquette 
1917); John K. Jennings, Jr. '54 (John 
K. Jennings — Georgetown 1915); San- 
ford Paskow '54 (Harry A. Paskow — 
Columbia 1916); Charles G. Blue, Jr. 
'53 (Charles G. Blue — Vanderbilt 
1926) ; Robert B. Bridgeman '53 
( George Bridgeman — Western Reserve 
1899); Edward D. Gardenier '53 (Har- 
old C. Gardenier — Pennsylvania 1916) ; 
Henry W. Rucker, Jr. (Henry W. 
Rucker— Vanderbilt 1925); Thomas F. 
Leggett, Jr. '52 (Thomas F. Leggett — 
Atlanta-Southern 1923); Jack R. Mar- 
tin '52 (Ernest L. Martin — Louisville 
1914); Raymond J. Vassar, Jr.,. '52 
(Raymond J. Vassar — Ohio); Clyde O. 
Wells, Jr. '52 (Clyde O. Wells— At- 
lanta-Southern 1918). 

The Alexander Patterson Award 

For many years the Patterson 
Award in Prosthetics has been one of 
the outstanding prizes annually award- 



ed to members of the graduating Class 
With the desire to guarantee the per- 
petuity of this Award the Prosthetics 
Committee, sponsored by the Awards 
Committee of the National Alumni As- 
sociation, invites contributions from 
the Alumni to a trust fund of one 
thousand dollars, the sum necessary 
for the proper financial support of the 
Award. Contributions should be sent 
to Dr. James E. Pyott Medical Arts 
Building, Baltimore 1, Md. 

Dr. Patterson achieved international 
recognition for his contributions in the 
field of prosthetics; he was for many 
years the Professor of Prosthetics at 
his alma mater; and he was a powerful 
figure on all levels of dental organiza- 
tion. As a great contributor to dental 
education, organization, literature and 
practice, Dr. Patterson occupies a high 
place among the alumni of the 
B.C.D.S. 

The ROTC Unit 

The Dental ROTC Unit began its 
fourth year by changing its quarters 
from the Museum of the School to the 
second floor of the old University 
Hospital building. The Unit is under 
the direction of Lieutenant Colonel 
John L. Campbell, who was promoted 
to his present rank in July. 

In June, 38 members of the gradu- 
ating class will receive Reserve com- 
missions. These seniors will have 
completed successfully the Clinical 
Clerkship course of summer camp in- 
struction offered at the Peicy Jones 
Hospital, Walter Reed Hospital or the 
Brooke Hospital, and the required mili- 
tary instruction courses given at the 
School. 

The ROTC enrollment includes over 
40'/' of the male students registration: 
42 freshmen, 52 sophomores 29 juniors, 
and 38 seniors. 

Lieutenant Colonel Campbell is as- 
sisted by Master Sergeant Leo Hirsch, 
who has been with the Unit since its 
inception, and Master Sergeant Adrian 
L. McQuistion, who came to the Unit 
in August as the replacement of Ser- 
geant First Class Vern M. Hostbjor, 
now serving a tour of duty in the Euro- 
pean Command. 



[161 



Personal Notes 

Stuart Ratner, '50, is now in the 
Navy. His ship has just left for 
Southern ports. 

Nat Byer, '21, is a member of the 
New Jersey State Board of Registra- 
tion and Examination in Dentistry. 

Eddie Bressman, '41, discharged as 
Captain U. S. Army is now married, 
has a little girl and practices in Irv- 
ington. 

Victor Mintz, '42, is married, has a 
son, and is practicing in Irvington. 

Ben Jacobs, '26, is now a Diplomat 
of the American Board of Oral Surgery 
and has lectured before the American 
Dental Club of Paris and the Colegio de 
Estomologos de Primer in Madrid. 

Warren Haggerty, Jr., '41, is happily 
married, has a family, and practices 
in Ridgewood. 

Edmund Bohne, '41, is married and 
has a family of four. 

Herbert Krasner, '44, is now married 
and practices in Verona. 

Morton De Scherer, '41, was a cap- 
tain in the Infantry, received two pur- 
ple hearts, has 2 children, and prac- 
tices in Englewood. 

Chester Stopack, '42, is a Lt. Com- 
mander at St. Albans Hospital; has 2 
daughters. 

Murray Storch, '41, Passaic, and 
Norman Rubin, '43, Elizabeth, are still 
bachelors. 

John Toffic, '41, has a busy practice 
in Bergenfield. 

Freddie Blake, '44, is now practic- 
ing surgery in Paterson. 

Harry Fine, '19, Saul M. Gale, '22, 
Louis Lauer, '27, and Samuel Silber, 
'29, have their sons in the present 
Freshman Class in Dental School. Of 
course at the U. of M. 

Albin W. Rauch, '27, is president of 
the Essex County Dental Society. 

Lou Ulanet, '25, has his son a pre- 
dent student at Lafayette College. 

Frank Sabatino, '34, is the past 
president of the Plainfield Dental So- 
ciety. 

Butch Lillien, '34, practices in New- 
ark and is now happily married. 

McCarthy Lecture 

Charley Roberts, '00, Alden Van 
Natta, '01, Irving Schein, '30, Phil 
Schwartz, '30, Lester Older, '34, N. 
Berman, '33, Joseph Downs, '37, 
Johnny Coleman, '32, Charley Hen- 
nessy, '44, Percy Quirk were pres- 
ent at the Hudson County Dental So- 
ciety to hear our own Harry McCarthy 
talk on Insurance and Investments. 

S. H. Wilde, '27, practicing in Belle- 
ville, has his leg in a cast now. An old 
football injury while playing at Dick- 
enson College, Pennsylvania, before en- 
tering Dental School has flared up 
again. We all wish him a quick recov- 
ery. 

Bob Jernick, '50, is now in general 
practice in Nutley after interning at 
the Newark City Hospital for a year. 

Richard H. Lynn, '50, leaving New 
Jersey to practice on Liberty Heights 
Avenue, Baltimore, has one child and 
the stork is expected in February. 

Lou Greenwald, '25, still is active in 



Children's Dentistry. He is a past 
president of the New Jersey State 
Unit of Children's Dentistry. 

Donald J. McElroy, '50, after a year's 
internship at the Greystone State Hos- 
pital, is now practicing in Dover. Mar- 
ried, has one youngster, boy. 

Milton Cooper, '36, of Hackensack, 
besides giving many clinics is most 
active in the Bergen County Dental 
Society. 

Paul Mitchell, '50, is in the Navy. 
Was at Quantico, Virginia. 

Daniel C. Scotti, '50, is married, has 
one child, and practices in Newark 
with another Maryland alumnus, Bruno 
Kuta, '36. 

Henry W. Teykar, '50, is now prac- 
ticing in Long Branch after interning 
at Marine Hospital in Staten Island. 
He is married. 

Alan A. Gale, '50, is a captain with 
the U. S. Air Force now stationed at 
Sculthorpe, England. 

Charley Polk, '25, Red Devlin, '23, 
having a grand time at all the meet- 
ings. Both do get around and are still 
most active in societies, I mean Dental. 

Necrology 

It is with deep regret that we men- 
tion that the following are no longer 
with us. The entire New Jersey 
Alumni wishes to express to the be- 
reaved families their sincere sympathy. 

Lawrence T. Bruskin, '29, New 
Brunswick, N. J. 

Martin Brumberger, '15, Milburn, 
N. J. 

Vincent A. Suchorski, Bayonne, N. J. 

James R. Mabee, Paterson, N. J. 

Win. R. Hawkins, Freehold, N. J. 

Dr. Hugh G. McElroy, '09, Dover, 
N. J. 

George E. Mickens, Butler, N. J. 

Chas. A. Spahn, '03, Newark, N. J. 

Dr. Myron S. Aisenberg '22, Pro- 
fessor of Pathology, conducted a ser- 
ies of ten seminars in Oral Path- 
ology at the U. S. P. H. S. Hospital 
in Baltimore. On June 7, he pre- 
sented a paper on "Tumors of Dental 
Origin" before the meeting of the 
American Association for the Study 
of Neoplastic Diseases held in Balti- 
more. At the meeting of the Middle 
Atlantic Society of Oral Surgeons, held 
at White Sulphur Springs, W. Va., in 
June, he read a paper on "Tumors of 
Dental Origin and Cysts of the Jaw." 

Dr. Aisenberg served as a member 
of the faculty of the Workshop on 
Periodontal Disease sponsored by the 
University of Michigan 'September 10- 
17, at Ann Arbor. On October 13 he 
presented an exhibit of moulages of 
cancer before the meeting of the 
American Society of Oral Surgeons at 
Washington, D. C. The moulages, 
which attracted a great deal of atten- 
tion and received enthusiastic praise, 
were made by Miss Margaret Wood, 
Instructor in Visual Aids. Dr. Aisen- 
berg spoke on "Problems of Diagnosis" 
before the joint meeting of the Uni- 
versity of Buffalo Dental Alumni As- 
sociation and the Eighth District Den- 
tal Society held in Buffalo on Novem- 
ber 7. 



Dr. E. Shay, Professor of Bacteri- 
ology, is Chairman of the Hospital 
Laboratory Services Training Commit- 
tee under the State Civilian Defense 
Program. In thirteen widely dis- 
tributed centers, college students and 
volunteers will lie taught the hospital 
techniques that would be necessary in 
case of an enemy attack. The program 
will train approximately 1,500 persons 
each year. Dr. Shay was recently 
elected President of the Maryland 
Branch of the Society of American 
Bacteriologists, to serve until January 
1, 1952. During the summer he pre- 
sented a paper on "Operating Room 
Sterilization" before the annual meet- 
ing of the American Hospital Pharma- 
cists Association, held in Buffalo, 
N. Y. Dr. Shay collaborated with Dr. 
R. W. McCue '51 and Dr. F. G. Mc- 
Dougal '51, now in the Air Force, on 
a paper — "The Antibacterial Proper- 
ties of Some Dental Restorative Ma- 
terials" — that was published in Oral 
Surgery, Oral Medicine and Oral Path- 
ology for September, 1951. 
At York, Pa. 

Dr. Edward C. Dobbs '29, Professor 
of Pharmacology, addressed the York 
Dental Society of York, Pa., on No- 
vember 2. His subject was "Drugs 
Useful in Dental Practice." On No- 
vember 7 he spoke on "Antibiotics 
Useful in Dental Practice" at the meet- 
ing of the Allegany-Garrett Dental 
Society held in Cumberland, Md. "Peni- 
cillin in Oral Medicine", by Dr. Dobbs, 
in collaboration with Dr. Bernard Es- 
kow '38, Assistant Professor of Perio- 
dontology, was published in the No- 
vember issue of the Journal of the 
New York Dental Society. Another 
article by Dr. Dobbs, "Use and Abuse 
of Antibiotic Therapy in Oral Medi- 
cine," appeared in the December num- 
ber of the Bulletin of the School of 
Medicine, University of Maryland. Dr. 
Dobbs continues to act as a consultant 
of the Army Dental Corps Army Medi- 
cal Center, Washington, D. C. 

Dr. Samuel H. Bryant '32, Instructor 
in Diagnosis, is serving his fifth term 
as treasurer of the Maryland State 
Dental Association. 

Mr. Gardner P. H. Foley, Associate 
Professor of Dental History and Den- 
tal Literature, spoke at the meeting of 
the College Women's Club of Balti- 
more on November 30. His subject was 
"Humorous Poetry." 

Joe H. Diaz-Gonzalez '50 

The first alumnus to visit his alma 
mater after service in Korea is Captain 
Diaz-Gonzalez, of Saguas, Puerto Rico. 
He enlisted in the Army Dental Corps 
shortly after graduation. Dr. Diaz- 
Gonzalez married Mary Defelice of 
Hagerstown, Md., On September 4. He 
is now stationed at Aberdeen, Md. 

At Mobile 

Frank J. Houghton, '17, is now Dean 
of Loyola University Dental School. 
Recently he spoke at the Springhill 
College in Mobile, Alabama. His talk 
was printed in the Mendelian Maga- 
zine. His subject, "Dentistry as a Pro- 
fession." 



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At Woods Hole 

Dr. Robert H. Oster, Professor of 
Physiology, attended the summer ses- 
sion of lectures in the biological sci- 
ences at Wood's Hole, Mass.; he also 
attended the fall meetings of the East- 
ern Association of Electrocephalo- 
graphers, held at the Georgetown Uni- 
versity Medical School. Dr. Oster was 
recently elected to membership in the 
Society for Experimental Biology and 
Medicine. 

Dr. E. Roderick Shipley, Instructor 
in Physiology, is secretary of the Sur- 
gical Section of the Baltimore City 
Medical Society. Dr. Shipley continues 
to serve as Associate Editor of the 
Bulletin of the School of Medicine. 

Dr. Burton R. Pollack '46, Instruc- 
tor in Physiology, is president of the 
Maryland Chapter of the Sigma Epsi- 
lon Delta fraternity; he is also the edi- 
tor of the journal published by the na- 
tional organization of the fraternity. 

Dr. Ernest Nuttall '31, Professor of 
Fixed Partial Prosthesis, appeared on 
the program of the September meeting 
of the Columbus (Ohio) Dental So- 
ciety. Dr. Nuttall presented an illu- 
strated discussion on "Practical 
Aspects of Fixed Partial Prosthesis." 

At Asheville 

Dr. Harry B. McCarthy '23, Director 
of Clinics, presented a paper on "Some 
Fundamental Factors to Be Consid- 
ered in Building and Maintaining a 
Successful Dental Practice" at the 
meeting of the Blue Ridge Dental So- 
ciety in Asheville, N. C, on August 13. 
Dr. McCarthy appeared on the pro- 
gram of the Ohio State Dental Society 
meeting in Cleveland, November 25-26, 
when he read a paper on "Insurance 
and Investments for the Dentist" and 
gave a limited attendance clinic on 
"Dental Economics." On December 11 
he addressed the Eastern Shore Dental 
Society at Cambridge, Md.; his subject 
was "An Adequate Insurance Program 
for the Dentist." In August Dr. Mc- 
Carthy was appointed Consultant in 
Operative Dentistry to the Veterans 
Administration Hospital at Fort How- 
ard, Md. 

Dr. Kyrle W. Preis '29, Professor 
of Orthodontics, presented a paper on 
"Dental and Facial Maldevelopments 
That May Be Due to Inherent Growth 
Factors as Modified by Habits" at the 



October meeting of the Frederick 
County (Md.) Dental Society. In No- 
vember Dr. Preis visited the United 
States Navy Dental School at Beth- 
esda, Md. where he discussed "Oral 
and Facial Maldevelopments Due to 
Aberrations in Growth and Other As- 
sociated Factors." 

Dr. Harold Golton '25, Associate 
Professor of Oral Diagnosis, had the 
unusually interesting experience of 
appearing on the program of the 
Federation Dentaire Internationale 
meeting in Brussels, Belgium, on 
June 10. Dr. Golton addressed the 
Federation on "Differential Diagnosis 
of Oral Soft Tissue Diseases." 

To A. S. O. S. 

Dr. Joseph P. Cappuccio '46, Assis- 
tant Professor of Oral Surgery and 
Anesthesiology, was recently elected 
to membership in the American So- 
ciety of Oral Surgeons. Dr. Cappuccio 
also is a charter member of the re- 
cently organized Middle Atlantic So- 
ciety of Oral Surgeons. He was also 
elected to membership in Omicron 
Kappa Upsilon at the June meeting of 
the society. 

Dr. George M. Anderson '19 
(B.C.D.S.) presented a paper on 
"Discussions with Parents and Sup- 
porting Correspondence Relative to 
Initiating Orthodontic Treatment" at 
the meeting of the Southern Society 
of Orthodontists held at White Sulphur 
Springs, W. Va. on August 1. At the 
meeting of the Great Lakes Society of 
Orthodontists, in Cleveland, November 
7, Dr. Anderson read a paper on "Ac- 
tivities Which Mark and Make a Pro- 
fession, and Achievements Which Aid 
It to Meet the Demands of the Day." 
Dr. Anderson presented a registered 
clinic at the Greater New York Dental 
Meeting in New York City, Decem- 
ber 4-6. 

Dr. Henry W. Teyker '50 recently 
announced the opening of an office for 
the general practice of dentistry at 156 
Atlantic Avenue, Long Branch, N. J. 
Dr. Teyker is a member of the Class 
of 1950, a class remarkable for the 
war services of its members and their 
fine accomplishments as students. 
Henry came to the B.C.D.S. following 
several years of Army service in 
Australia, New Guinea, and the Philip- 
pines. 

Major James Baido '46 

A report on Major Baido obtained 
from the Reverend Martin C. Hoehn, 
Chaplain of the 31st Infantry, gives 
an interesting and vivid story of Jim- 
my's last known experience in the com- 
bat area: 

"Our regiment had been east of the 
Furen Reservoir until November 25 
(1950). On that day some elements 
started for Hagaru-ri and the Chan- 
gin Reservoir. The journey had to be 
made by way of Hamhung. The dis- 
tance was great and some of the per- 
sonnel used the railroad as well as 
motor vehicles. 

"Major Baido's convoy, rather small, 
was behind the one in which I was 
riding. We arrived at Hagaru-ri long 



after dark, November 27, and con- 
tinued another five miles northeast. 
The park of Regimental Headquarters 
was at this point and we stopped there 
just after midnight, November 28. 

"Major Baido's convoy continued, 
hoping to proceed to the forward part 
of the Regiment, including artillery. 
They had gone only two miles when 
the convoy was ambushed by the Chi- 
nese. This was the first appearance 
of the Chinese in that area. 

"One medical officer and an enlisted 
man got through to the forward posi- 
tion and a number of men came back 
on foot. Major Baido and his driver 
were never seen again and no one 
could say that he saw either of them 
captured or wounded. Later that day 
and again the next day we fought to 
get to the point of the ambush but 
could not do so. 

"On December 2, the foi-ward ele- 
ments fought their way to Hagaru. 
They saw only the disabled vehicles. 
Hence it is clear that no other report 
can be made than that Major Baido 
is missing in action. I suggest that 
you avoid coming to any conclusion 
as to his being dead or captured." 

Zeno L. Edwards '17 

Commencement Week of 1952 will be 
a wonderful time for Zeno L. Edwards 
of the Class of 1917 (U. of Md.) He 
will have two very attractive reasons 
for returning to his alma mater: the 
Thirty-fifth Reunion of his class and 
the graduation of his son, Zeno, Jr., 
who is following in his fathers' foot- 
steps. After his graduation from 
Maryland Dr. Edwards was commis- 
sioned a First Lieutenant in the Dental 
Corps. Following his discharge he 
opened an office in Washington N. C, 
where he has been practicing for 
thirty-two years. Like most of the 
men who have achieved recognition as 
leaders in the profession, Dr. Edwards 
has gained prominence for his achieve- 
ments outside the professional field. 

In North Carolina 

In 1931 he served as editor of The 
Burr, bulletin of the Fifth District. 
The next year he was elected presi- 
dent of the Fifth District Dental So- 
ciety. With his selection, in 1935, to 
the presidency of the North Carolina 
Dental Society he took his place among 
the notable graduates of the B.C.D.S. 
who have served as heads of organ- 
ized dentistry in the various states. 
He is a Fellow of the American Col- 
lege of Dentists (1947). 

In the field of civic affairs Dr. Ed- 
wards served two terms in the North 
Carolina General Assembly (sessions 
of 1939 and 1941), where he took a 
keen interest in legislation related to 
the schools of the state. At present 
he is a member of the Washington City 
Utilities Commission and of the North 
Carolina Medical Care Commission. A 
member of Rotary since 1927, he was 
president of the Washington club in 
1932. 

(Concluded on page 6i) 



[18] 



CotL ro ( HOME 
ECONOMICS 

By Lucy Knox and 
Mary Speake Humelsine 



THE Home Economics Alumni 
Board met at the home of Mary 
Langford on December 5th. 

Those present were Mary Charlotte 
Chaney, Mary Humelsine, Lucy 
Knox, Mary Langford, Miss Mount, 
Hilda Nystrom, Ha- 
zel Tuemmler and 
Katharine Longridge. 
V *^^% It was decided to 

have our traditional 
Spring reunion. 

The president ap- 
pointed Mary Char- 
lotte Chaney and Ha- 
zel Tuemmler as a 
committee to make 
recommendations for 
Homecoming to the 
Alumni Council. 
An auditing com- 
mittee was appointed, composed of the 
president, secretary and Dean Mount. 
Spring Reunion 
Plans are being made for the Spring 
meeting at which various activities 




Mary Chaney 





Mary Humelsine Hazel Tuemmler 

have became traditional. They include 
presentation of the Senior Award and 
the Alumni Achievement Awards, a pro- 
gram of interest to alumni, both of 
professional interest and family living 
and also the induction of the Home Eco- 
nomics senior class into the Alumni As- 
sociation and entertaining the seniors 
as guests at the luncheon. 
Job Box 

Requests have come for Home Eco- 
nomics Extension Work: 

Dietitian for Utilities Companies; 

Dietitians in Hospitals; 

Food Demonstraters. 

Whenever you are interested in 
changing positions please notify Miss 
Mount. 

Personal Items 

Martha Ross Temple Andrews, of 
radio fame, is now making her home 
in Cambridge, Maryland. Among her 
many activities there she instructed in 
the Cambridge Hospital Auxiliary. On 
January 15th she was elected first vice- 
President of the Maryland Association 
of Hospital Auxiliaries. 

Alice Davey '46 received her mas- 
ter's degree from Cornell in Septem- 
ber. She is now in charge of the Home 
Management Apartment at the Uni- 




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versity of Massachusetts at Amherst. 
She is also teaching two foods classes 
there. 

Betty Ann Levin Gwynn (Mrs. 
Edgar, Jr.) is with her husband in Bal- 
timore where he is studying for his 
Ph.D. at Johns Hopkins. Betty is 
working at the University of Maryland 
Hospital. 

Cathy Compton is teaching Home 
Economics at the high school in Gon- 
zales, Calif. 

Margaret Galloway has been pro- 
moted to Biologist in the Mycology 
Department of the Lederle Labora- 
tories. She resides with her Aunt 
Phyliss Morgan Gazzola (Mrs. John 
V.) of the Class of '26 on Wearimus 
Road, R.D. No. 2, Ridgewood, N. J. 

Sigma Delta Epsilon 
Professor Pela Braucher, of the Col- 
lege of Home Economics, has been 
elected to membership in the Omicron 
Chapter of Sigma Delta Epsilon, na- 
tional scientific fraternity for women. 

4-H Scholarship 

Kathryn B. Roe, sophomore in home 
economics, was awarded a $300 college 
scholarship at the annual 4-H Club 
Congress held in Chicago. 

She was one of 12 national winners 
in the clothing division. 

The 19-year-old coed won the award 
for her work in making her own clothes 
and general sewing. 
Miss Roe began 
sewing for herself 
when she was a 
sophomore in high 
school. At college 
she not only makes 
her own clothes but 
sews for others to 
help pay her ex- 
penses. 

Miss Roe used the 
first money she 
earned from work- 
ing in a clothing factory after gradu- 
ating from high school to buy a sew- 
ing machine. She has been "at home" 
with it ever since. 

She makes button holes for the 
Home Ec students and her ability is 
always in demand when there is sew- 
ing work to be done in her dormitory. 
In addition to her clothing work, 
Miss Roe has done projects in baking, 
meal preparation, canning, freezing, 
home management, home furnishings, 
poultry, flower gardens, recreation, and 
leadership during her seven-year 4-H 
career. 

On campus she belongs to the col- 
legiate 4-H club. She is also a mem- 
ber of the Maryland All-Stars, an hon- 
orary 4-H organization. 

Other Maryland students attending 
the national convention were Joan 
Webber, sophomore in home economics, 
who placed second in the health divis- 
ion; James B. Arnold, sophomore in 
agriculture; and Harry Kirk, fresh- 
man in physical education. 

Approximately 1200 delegates from 
various parts of the United States, 
Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Alaska at- 
tended the convention. 




Miss Roe 




NATIONAL AWARDS 

Shown at left is Marvin Perry. President of 
the University of Maryland Interfraternity 
Council proudly holding the award Maryland 
received from the National Interfraternity 
Council for the best local interfraternity coun- 
cil in the "large college in a small town" class. 

Miss Helen Carey, pictured at right. President 
of the local Panhelenic Council, rests her hand 
on the mammoth trophy Maryland's Interfrater- 
nity Council received for being the best local 
group in the country as a whole. 




Dietetics Lecture 

Miss Kathryn Sandmeyer of the 
Evaporated Milk Association gave lec- 
ture-diemonstrations 
in the Home Eco- 
nomics Building. 

Miss Sandmeyer 
brings to her lec- 
ture - demonstration 
work a wealth of 
experience in the 
dietetics and home 
economic fields. 
Prior to joining the 
home economics 
staff of the Evapo- 
rated Milk Associ- 
ation in 1946, she 
was a dietitian with the U. S. Army 
Medical Department, serving 14 
months overseas in both the European 
and Pacific theatres of war. In the early 
years, Miss Sandmeyer was assistant 
director of mess halls and canteens 
for an aviation company in Florida. 
In that capacity she directed food ser- 
vice for five Army aviation fields where 
5,000 British and American air cadets 
and training personnel were served 
daily. 

After receiving her bachelor's degree 
in home economics from the University 
of Illinois, Miss Sandmeyer began her 
career as a dietitian. 



Miss Sandmeyer 



FACULTY CLUB DANCE GROUP 

The Faculty Club Canteen and Dance 
Group held its second session in the 
Maryland Room. Dr. Allen, Mrs. Cook 
and Dr. Triggs were in charge of the 
evening. The group will continue to 
meet once a week until Easter. 

• •••••*•••••* 

ROBERT BROWNING:— 

"Progress is the lau- of life — Man is 
not man as yet." 



[20] 



Co(L ro ( SPECIAL and 
CONTINUATION STUDIES 



Soldiers' Night School 

By Raymond J. Blair 
Nexe York Herald-Tribune 

WHEN Capt. John J. Swift, of 
Glens Falls, N. Y., was jailed 
by the Communists in Hungary with 
three other crewmen of the cap- 
tured Air Force C-47 one way he tried 
to keep from worrying about his fate 
was to read and reread a thick book 
with the unexciting title "Personnel 
Administration." 

The captain is one of nearly 250,000 
service personnel, mostly Air Force 
and Army people, who are going to 
night school around the globe — even 
in Korea. They are attending group 
study classes, taking correspondence 
courses and, like Capt. Swift, working 
on extension courses mapped out by 
eighty-seven colleges and universities 
cooperating with the ambitious pro- 
gram of the Army's Troop Informa- 
tion and Education Division. 

Most of the subjects taught are non- 
military. Pentagon spokesmen say 
their aim is to increase the efficiency of 
the armed forces by raising the educa- 
tional level of the service men. 
Some Far-Flung Classes 

Capt. Swift is studying business ad- 
ministration under the guidance of the 
University of Maryland, which during 
last fall's term had forty-five teachers 
on the job at sixty-three centers in 
the European theater, whose duty was 
to extend educational opportunities to 
some 4,600 students. 

Maryland's biggest operation is in 
Germany where it has forty centers. 
There are ten in Great Britain, four 
each in France, Austria and Africa, 
and one in Trieste. 

Education at these places is often 
dealt out under trying and sometimes 
amusing circumstances. 

Take the time one Maryland man 
was teaching a course at Erding, Ger- 
many, whence Capt. Swift's C-47 took 
off on its Hungarian flight. Half the 
class was suddenly moved to North 
Africa for maneuvers. But the Air 
Force rose to the occasion and flew 
the professor there on week ends until 
he had completed the course. 

At Salzburg, part of a class was 
called out on maneuvers midway 
through a course. The Army rigged 
up a radio circuit so the teacher could 
lecture to his pupils at Salzburg and 
to the soldiers in the field at the same 
time. 

"Teachers say you can't teach under 
these circumstances," says Dr. Joseph 
M. Ray, Dean of the College of Special 
and Continuation Studies, "but the bug- 
eventually bites them. Almost all our 
teachers who are able to, want to go 
on for a second year after having 
taught one year in Europe." 



According to Dr. Ray, most of the 
Maryland students are working for a 
B.S. degree in military science. They 
study military speech and command 
leadership, military policy and logis- 
tics, English, foreign languages, and 
history, and can take electives like 
geography, Shakespeare, and model n 
novel and drama. 

The University recently expanded its 
field and set up centers also at New- 
foundland, Goose Bay and Iceland. 

3-Million-Mile Campus 

In the Far East, the University of 
California has established thirty-six 
centers in a "campus" of 3,000,000 
square miles. Some 1,400 G. I.'s are 
currently taking a general college 
course under this program. A quar- 
ter of these are in Korea where college 
centers have been set up at Pusan and 
Taegu. 

The Army says it isn't pushing the 
program in the Far East because the 
accent is on the Korean War But 
twenty-eight island-hopping professors 
are kept busy, flying from base to base 
at the end of each eight-week accele- 
rated semester. 

In Korea 

Lt. Col. Harold P. Baker was re- 
cently assigned in Korea as chief of 
the Movement Control Division of the 
Eighth Army Transportation Section. 

Colonel Baker, 34, attended Mary- 
land (C.&C.S. '48-'49) and is a gradu- 
ate of the Ordnance Automotive School, 
Fort McPherson, Ga., and the Advanced 
Officer's Course at the Transportation 
school, Fort Eustis, Va. 

At Fort Monroe 

Lt. Col. George A. Traeger, who at- 
tended the College of Special and Con- 
tinuation Studies in '48, has been as- 
signed to the Quartermaster Section 
of Army Field Forces, Fort Monroe, 
Va. He has recently completed a course 
in parachute packing, maintenance and 
aerial delivery. 

Colonel Traeger entered the Army 
as a 2nd lieutenant in 1940. During 
World War II he served in the Asiatic- 
Pacific theater, seeing duty in the East 
Indies, Papua, New Guinea, and the 
Philippines. He has been awarded the 
Philippine Presidential Citation, and 
wears the wings of a qualified para- 
chutist. Colonel Traeger also has at- 
tended the Command and General Staff 
College, Fort Leavenworth, Kansas. 

Colonel Traeger has played semi- 
professional baseball in the San Fran- 
cisco area and competed with rifle 
teams in the Pacific North West. 

THOMAS HARDY:— 

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to go to the bottom of things." 



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S^cnool of 

MEDICINE 



By Norman Clark 
Baltimore News-Post 

TELEVISION, this newcomer into 
the realm of communications is a 
courageous youngster. He's willing to 
step boldly into new fields. 

Scoffers are trying to hoot the child 
down, sneering superiority when his 
footsteps falter now and then as he 
marches confidently onward. These, 
generally speaking, are the sophisti- 
cates, the intellectuals (?). 

But I notice, as I keep a close watch 
on my video screen, that more and 
more interesting people are appearing 
thereon with more and more interest- 
ing topics. 

I look and listen to important fig- 
ures of science, literature, education, 
music, medicine, the theater and other 
worthy facets of civilization as they 
make their television bows. 

Let the scoffers scoff and the sneer- 
ers sneer, this wonder called television 
is steadily on its way to betterment in 
every way. 

Our universities have been quick to 
sense the value of video in the dis- 
semination of knowldge. 

University on TV 

Now comes the University of Mary- 
land. 

The U. of M. recently began a series 
called "Live and Help Live through Sci- 
ence," presented each Tuesday via 
WBAL-TV, 10:35 P. M. 

Thus far it has projected activities 
of the various departments of the 
School of Medicine. 

The inaugural program had to do 
with psychiatry and was presided over 
by Dr. Jacob E. Finesinger, professor 
of that subject. 

For the first time I — and I'm sure 
it was true also of hundreds of other 
persons — sat in on an examination of a 
patient by a psychiatrist. All of us 
have seen countless cartoons and heard 
innumerable jokes about the psychia- 
trist and his couch. 

No Hocus-pocus 

But here we were observing an office 
of a true medico and a woman (Doro- 
thy Cotten) who was simulating a pa- 
tient. There was no couch, no hocus- 
pocus; simply a physician sitting 
quietly in his office, with pad and pen- 
cil, trying to find out why a lady suf- 
fered from recurrent headaches. He 
asked questions— that didn't seem at 
all pertinent — about her home, her 
family, her daily tasks and the like. 

Then followed a conference among 
Dr. Finesinger and other University of 
Maryland phychiatrists and we discov- 
ered that the interviewer's questions 
were very germane indeed to the pa- 
tient's ailments. Also the fact that the 
lady flared up and barked at the doc- 



tor so to say, was significant. 

A fellow with a simple pain in his 
ankle can go to a certain type of doc- 
tor and when he has listened to some 
fancy medical terms — he'll think he 
has leprosy. 

The men of the University of Mary- 
land however, were plain-spoken, lucid 
and most interesting indeed. Of 
course, I could not be a psychiatrist 
from that one experience, but I have 
a better idea what such a healer is 
seeking when he asks his seemingly 
irrelevant questions. 

Judging from the first program this 
University of Maryland medical series 
should be very informative and enter- 
taining, as well. 

This column salutes Dr. Finesinger 
and his aides for their excellent intro- 
ductory program. They helped to show 
that a university can come right into 
our homes — and not knock us into a 
mental tailspin; rather the contrary. 



School of 

NURSING 

By Amy Lee Wells '40 



Emergency Taxi Service 

WHILE the Baltimore Transit 
Company was not operating, 
due to a strike, Hospital Director 
George H. Buck, his assistant, Mr. 
Dasch, several of the Nurses, as well 
as doctors' wives ran a taxi route. Not 
just once a day but enough to cover 
all three shifts, until a bus route could 
be established. There were surpris- 
ingly few complaints from the Nurses. 
One person said that she was certainly 
doing more shopping, because she had 
a couple of hours to wait in the after- 
noons for her ride home. 

The waiting room and board room 
have been redecorated. The waiting 
room is beautiful. Writing desk. 
Couches in the middle of the room 
where the big round table used to be. 
The couches are upholstered in a soft 
green and the chairs in figured fab- 
bric. New lamps all around. The 
phone booths in the archway have been 
replaced by lighted display cases for 
the wares of the Gift Shop. Mighty 
elegant. 

Real cafeteria now — several varieties 
of all courses. Mr. Harry Stravides, 
Manager in Charge of Food Service, is 
responsible for the excellent fare. 

This and That 

Jean G. Waters, Class of 1948 is 
public health nurse in Washington 
County, Myersville, Md. 

A note from Mrs. Robert E. Brown, 
telling us that she now has a family 
of five girls — Mary Kathleen, four 
years old, Marjorie Ann, three years 
old, Linda Jean, two years old, Judith 
and Janet, identical twins, eighteen 
months old. Mr. and Mrs. Brown live 
in Bristol, Indiana. Mrs. Brown was 
Mary Louise Nicol, Class of 1944. 

Ann Caroline Lutz, Class of 1946 is 



[22] 



Clinical Supervisor in the Surgical 
Department at Duke University, Dur- 
ham, North Carolina. 

Dr. and Mrs. F. Drennan Gassaway 
are residing in Pittsburgh, Pa. where 
Dr. Gassaway is completing his fourth 
year in general surgery at the Western 
Pennsylvania Hospital. Mrs. Gassa- 
way was Ruth Michaels, Class of 1943. 
Ruth Clements, B.S. and M.A., Class 
of 1920, is science instructor and stu- 
dent counselor at the York Hospital, 
York, Pa. 

Mrs. Nancy Connelly Read, Class of 
1938, assisted in opening a new hospi- 
tal in September, 1951, in Tyler, Texas. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. Franklin Almony 
moved into their new home at 503 Park 
Avenue, Towson, Md. Mrs. Almony 
was Gwendolyn Haugh, Class of 1938. 
Mrs. Virginia Hinkle Dietrich, Class 
of 1947, has an industrial nurses posi- 
tion with the New Amsterdam Insur- 
ance Company, Baltimore, Md. 
To Buffalo 
Miss Rita Miller, Class of 1935, has 
moved to Buffalo, N. Y., another indus- 
trial .nurses position. 

Catherine M. Atwater, Class of 1948, 
resigned her position with the Instruc- 
tive Visiting Nurses Association, and 
accepted a position with the Baltimore 
State Health Department. 

Dr. and Mrs. Edward Sokolski and 
their family have moved to Danbury, 
Conn., where Dr. Sokolski is practicing 
Obstetrics and Gynecology. Mrs. So- 
kolski was Betty K. Snyder, Class of 
1945. 

Mrs. John W. McCarley, Jr., is 
Senior Public Health Nurse at the 
Odenton Health Center, A. A. County. 
Mrs. McCarley was Betty Jane Thomp- 
son, Class of 1947. 

School of Nursing Births 

To Dr. and Mrs. Fred R. McCrumb, a 
daughter, Sharon Elizabeth, on Nov. 
14, 1951. Mrs. McCrumb was Gloria 
Mullen, Class of 1951. 

To Dr. and Mrs. James Henry Shell. 
Jr, a daughter, Kathy Lee, on Nov. 
27, 1951. Mrs. Shell was Ruth Eliza- 
beth Forsythe, Class 1943. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Stephen G. Heaver, 
a son, Allan Bancroft, on Dec. 4, 1951. 
Mrs. Heaver was Anna Doris Alt, 
Class of 1942. 

To Dr. and Mrs. John Murray Den- 
nis, a daughter, Lori Ann, on Dec. 8, 
1951. Mrs. Dennis was Mary Helen 
France, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Eugene C. Duncan, 
a daughter, Daphne Ellen, on Dec. 14, 
1951. Mrs. Duncan was Mildred 
Franklin Smith, Class 1950. 

To Dr. and Mrs. C. V. Latimer, a 
daughter, Andosia Clare, on March 15, 
1951. Mrs. Latimer was Henrietta 
Hubbard, Class of 1944. 

Mr. and Mrs. William Smith, a son, 
Charles Malcolm, on Jan. 2, 1951. Mrs. 
Smith was Gloria Nestor, Class 1949. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Ostrosky, 
a daughter, Marcia Ann, on Sept. 24, 
1951. Mrs. Ostrosky was Florence 
Floryan, Class 1947. 

To Mr. and Mrs. John P. Zebelean, 
Jr., a son, John P. Zebelean, III, on 
Jan. 24, 1943. And on Aug. 25, 1951, 



a daughter, Alice Rose. Mrs. Zebe- 
lean was Alice Barden, Class 1935. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Carl H. Kennedy, 
Jr., a son, Carl H. Ill, on Oct. 17, 1951. 
Mrs. Kennedy was Doris E. Rush, 
Class 1947. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Stephen R. Keister, 
a son, Stephen DeLin, on June 1(5, 1951. 
Mrs. Keister was Virginia Burbage, 
Class 1945. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Robert Louis 
Schraitle, a son, Robert Louis, Jr., 
on October 20, 1951. Mrs. Schraitle 
was Katherine Burbage, Class 1938. 

To Dr. and Mrs. Giles Q. Gilmer, a 
daughter, Mary Sue, on Sept. 8, 1951. 
Mrs. Gilmer was Phelena Sue Wilson, 
Class 1941. 

More Babies 

To Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Leroy Mar- 
tin, a son, Scott Ernest, on Oct. 26, 
1951. Mrs. Martin was Charlotte 
Eileen Shaffer, Class 1937. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Wm. George Cheno- 
weth, a daughter, Regina Isabelle, on 
October 13, 1951. Mrs. Chenoweth 
was Rosalind Isabelle Hollopter, Class 
1947. 

Mr. and Mrs. George Lamar Rag- 
burn, a daughter, Carolyn Elaine, on 
Oct. 10, 1951. Mrs. Ragburn was Joan 
Elaine Gleason, Class 1951. 

School of Nursing Marriages 

Joanne A. Wilson, Class 1951, to Dr. 
Paul D. McCoy, on Nov. 22, 1951. 

Margaret Patricia Ferguson, Class 
1950, to Mr. Frank H. Bischosf, on 
Dec. 14, 1951. 

Nan Rittenhouse, Class 1949, to Dr. 
Kyle Swisher, on May 5, 1951. 

Lois Henderson, Class 1949, to Mr. 
Raymond F. Vasser, on August 19, 
1951. 

And More Babies 

Barbara Lee Hart, Class 1948, to Mr. 
William Howard, in May, 1951. 

Charlotte Habib, Class 1949, to Mr. 
Tom Moore, on June 16, 1951. 

Esther M. Dallmus, Class 1937, to 
Mr. R. Woodland Rowe, March 29, 
1951. 

Thelma Elizabeth Baugher, Class 
1948, to Mr. Max Feld, on June 8, 1951. 

Lt. Peggy Sappington, Class 1948, to 
Major Edmund Novotny, on July 28, 
1951. 

Imogene M. Koontz, Class 1947, to 
Mr. Robert Conway, on Aug. 4, 1951. 

Ethelyn Elaine Woodburn, Class 
1948, to Mr. Robert Crow, on June 23, 
1951. 

Marguerite Elsie Burr, Class 1943, 
to Mr. Craig W. Wayman, on June 
22, 1951. 



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[23] 




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KJienn cJL. I V lartiii L^oiteae of 

ENGINEERING and 
AERONAUTICAL SCIENCES 

By Robert K. Warner '47 



From Canada 

FROM Flin Flon, Manitoba, Can- 
ada, comes a letter signed by Mal- 
colm N. Collison '38. Mac writes to 
"let 'MARYLAND' know of my change 
of address." He adds, "I've been here 
since the last of July, employed by the 
Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting 
Company, Ltd., as a consulting Me- 
chanical Engineer. The company 
mines and smelts copper, zinc, cad- 
mium and some gold and silver." 

Collison continues, "Flin Flon is on 
the Manitoba-Saskatchewan border 
about 600 miles northwest of Winni- 
peg which is a two day drive, or 3% 
hours by plane." To make the hun- 
ter's mouth water, he said, "This is 
great duck, deer, moose and fish coun- 
try. The average yearly temperature 
is 31 degrees and winters run about 
50 degrees below with about 6 hours 
of daylight. July has about one hour 
of darkness." 

Collison concluded his letter, "Guess 
I'll have very little chance of seeing 
anyone from Maryland up here, so now 
more than ever 'MARYLAND' becomes 
more interesting and more looked for- 
ward to." 

With Pennsylvania Line 

John D. Morris, a graduate of the 
University of Maryland, class of 1926. 
has been promoted to Assistant Gen- 
eral Manager of the Pennsylania Rail- 
road's Eastern Region. He formerly 
was Superintendent of the Pittsburgh 
Division. 

During his 25 
years on the Penn- 
sylvania Mr. Morris 
has had a wide and 
varied engineering 
and operating ex- 
perience, and he is 
well equipped t o 
handle his new and 
bigger responsibili- 
^j I ties. 
^tf ^^ ^k John Morris went 

I 41 U I directly into the 
Mr. Morris railroad busi n e s s 

when he left Mary- 
land with the degree of Bachelor of 
Science in Civil Engineering. He 
joined the Pennsylvania's long-estab- 
lished training program for junior en- 
gineers, a practical course open to 
promising young graduates of accred- 
ited engineering schools. 

He started as an apprentice in the 
Maintenance of Way Department and 
became an expert on problems of road- 
bed, track, signals, communications, 
bridges, stations and buildings. Over 
a 10-year period he served as a rod- 
man, as assistant track supervisor and 




track supervisor, and had special train- 
ing in accounting. 

In the years that followed Mr. Mor- 
ris occupied increasingly important 
positions with the railroad until to- 
day, at the age of 46, he assumes an 
important operating post. During the 
1940's he served as division engineer 
of the Philadelphia Terminal Division, 
and superintendent of the Wilkes— 
Barre, Renova and Panhandle Divis- 
ions. From the Panhandle post he 
was promoted in March, 1948, to Su- 
perintendent of the Pittsburgh Divis- 
ion. 

At N.O.L. 

Harold Earl Evans '51 (Eng.), has 
been appointed a mechanical engineer 
at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, 
White Oak. 

Mr. Evans will work in the Ammuni- 
tion Division of the Engineering De- 
partment. 

Porter William Erickson, was also 
appointed to a N.O.L. position as or- 
ganic chemist. 

He received his B.A. at Concordia 
College in 1947 and his Ph.D. at 
Maryland in January. He will work 
in the Plastics Branch of the Engineer- 
ing Department. Mr. Erickson is a 
member of the American Chemical So- 
ciety. 

Benjamin B. Halleck 

Benjamin B. Halleck, (B.S. Engi- 
neering '51), in the Atlantic Fleet Am- 
phibious Force as an electronics tech- 
nician on the USS Bowers, has been 
ordered to Officer Candidate School. 

Halleck is in line for an ensign's 
commission in his specialty, electronics. 

Though only 24 years old, Halleck 
has had 7 years service, entering the 
Reserve when he was 17. He attended 
three Navy Service Schools, pre-radio 
in Chicago, pre-radio at Del Monte, 
Calif, and advanced radio school Treas- 
ure Island, Calif. In 1946 he was dis- 
charged from the Navy and entered 
Maryland. 

He holds a bachelor of science degree 
in chemical engineering and belongs to 
Alpha Chi Sigma, the American Insti- 
tute of Chemical Engineers and the 
American Chemical Society. 

U. S. Citizen 

The wife of John Wallace Neave, 
(Eng. '50), a Portuguese countess, who 
gave up her title and chose disinheri- 
tance by her wealthy, patrician family 
in order to marry the man of her choice 
became an American citizen recently in 
Washington. 

The countess, Maria Carolina di Pa- 
tricinio Ferrollo Neave, now proudly 
plain Mrs. Neave, is employed as a sec- 
retary at the Brazilian Embassy. 



T24] 



Mrs. Neave met her husband, when 
the latter was serving as a lieutenant in 
the Merchant Marine in 1946. 

She was a medical student at that 
time and was called on to help her uncle, 
a physician, perform an operation on a 
shipmate of Mr. Neave in a Lisbon hos- 
pital. It was there she met her future 
husband. 

Romance blossomed and they were 
married in 1946. Mr. Neave continued 
his studies at Maryland. He is now in 
Monrovia, Liberia, installing a water 
system. 

"I am glad to give up my title," Mrs. 
Neave said. "I feel a new freedom as 
an American citizen. For the first 
time in my life I feel I am not a burden 
to any one and I am no longer depen- 
dent on my family." 

At Wright-Patterson 

Grads stationed at Wright Patterson 
Air Force Base, Dayton, 0., include 
Captain Robert M. Rivello, '43; Captain 
Bastian Hello, '46, manager of the '42- 
'43 rifle team; Captain Ulrich Geller, 
'43, member of '39-'43 rifle team; 1st 
Lieutenant Paul Klender, '50, member 
of rifle team; Captain George Dorr, 
'42, member of boxing team. 
At Hunter 

Dean S. S. Steinberg attended the 
meetings in Hunter College, New York, 
of the United Nations Educational, Sci- 
entific, and Cultural Organization 
(UNESCO). He represented the 
American Society for Engineering 
Education and its Committee on Inter- 
national Relations. 

Spring Rally 

Engineering alumni are urged to 
make plans now to attend the new and 
bigger Spring Rally on April 19. This 
event promises to make the Spring 
Rally second only to Homecoming, 
Engineering joining with Arts and 
Science, Business and Public Adminis- 
tration and Agriculture. 

The alumni will attend the Mary- 
land-Navy lacrosse game, a special sec- 
tion being reserved. After the game 
will be the registration and an infor- 
mal get-together at the respective col- 
leges. There will be a buffet supper 
with entertainment in the ballroom of 
the new million dollar College Park 
Shopping Center. 

The committee in charge of arrange- 
ments for the Engineering Alumni con- 
sists of Chester Ward and Col. O. H. 
Saunders. 

Aeronautical Engineering 

Professor A. Wiley Sherwood, Direc- 
tor of Wind Tunnel Operations and 
Acting Head of the Department of 
Aeronautical Engineering, announces 
the completion of a new six inch, 
supersonic wind tunnel. This wind tun- 
nel was designed entirely by wind tun- 
nel personnel and Professor Sherwood 
feels that it is one of the finest avail- 
able to students, excluding Government 
installations. 

Aircraft Armaments Incorporated 
was added recently to the list of inves- 
tigators making use of the University's 
large subsonic wind tunnel. 

Chemical Engineering 

Dr. Wilbert J. Huff, Director of the 



Experiment Station and Professor and 
Chairman of the Chemical Engineer- 
ing Department, has been appointed 
to a special committee on safety by the 
Operating Section of the American 
Gas Association. This committee is 
charged with important national re- 
sponsibility in the gas utility field 
relative to codes and specifications. Dr. 
Huff has served for many years on 
other committees, as chairman for sev- 
eral sub-committees and has repre- 
sented the Association on a national 
level at some of its meetings. 
Mechanical Engineering 
At the close of the Fall Semester the 
Mechanical Engineering Department 
lost the services of Mr. David W. 
Baker to the United States Bureau of 
Standards. Mr. Baker received his 
B.S. in 1944 and his M.S. in 1951, 
beginning his teaching duties in Sep- 
tember, 1947. In his teaching he has 
specialized in Thermodynamics, Heat 
Power and Internal Combustion En- 
gines. During his relatively short stay 
at the University he has demonstrated 
consistently high devotion to his job 
and a keen sense of humor, both of 
which will be missed here but will be 
an asset to his new employer. 

Institute of Fluid Dynamics 

Dr. Daniel Bershader, at the invita- 
tion of the Department of Physics of 
Lehigh University, gave a talk there 
on "Supersonic Jet Mixing at a Mach 
No. of 1.7." Dr. Alexander Weinstein 
also gave an invited talk, his being 
given at Princeton University on 
"Hydrodynamics." 

Several members of the Institute at- 
tended the annual meeting of the 
American Mathematical Society held 
in Providence, Rhode Island on Decm- 
ber 26th through 28th. Professor J. B. 
Diaz and Dr. Munroe H. Martin, Head 
of the Department of Mathematics at 
the University of Maryland, gave a 
joint paper on "The Wave Equation in 
Dimensions" and Dr. H. F. Weinberger 
presented a paper on "An Optimum 
Problem in the Method of Weinstein." 

Three members of the Institute pre- 
sented papers at the American Physical 
Society Meeting held in New York on 
January 1st and February 2nd. Dr. 
Melvin Green's talk was on "Mark Off 
Random Processes and the Statistical 
Mechanics of Time Dependent Phe- 
nomena," Dr. J. Mayo Greenburg gave 
a talk on "Application of the Vari- 
ational Method to Scattering by a 
Square Well Potential" and Dr. Robert 
Betchov presented a paper on "An 
Experimental Model of Turbulence." 

De Feriet Honored 

Dr. J. Kampe de Feriet, Visiting Re- 
search Professor in the Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics, was awarded a scientific prize 
by the French Academy of Sciences. 

The Grand Prix Poncelet, the Acad- 
emy's most important prize in the field 
of theoretical mechanics, was awarded 
to Dr. Kampe de Feriet for his work 
in turbulence and related statistical 
methods. A part of the work recog- 
nized was done at Maryland. 




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[25] 



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Browsing Room 

The University Library has opened 
a new "Browsing Room," which will 
make more of the Library's limited 
space available for "open shelf" privi- 
leges for faculty members, students 
and gi-aduate students. In opening the 
Browsing Room, the University is join- 
ing in a movement among colleges and 
universities which is gaining in popu- 
larity throughout the country. 

The new room seats 15 people and will 
house approximately 2000 volumes. 
Plans have been made to expand the col- 
lection from time to time from the new 
books purchased and from the present 
stack collection. The present collec- 
tion was selected by a committee ap- 
pointed by the Director, Mr. Howard 
Rovelstad, with the aid of several other 
library staff members. The basis for 
selection was "good taste" with a lean- 
ing toward contemporary life, books 
on hobbies, music, art, etc. Every class 
of book is represented. 

For several years, the Library Sci- 
ence classes have been answering a 
questionaire including such questions 
as "What books do you like to read?" 
"What is the last book you read?" 
"Do you read more periodicals than 
books?" and "Do you read a daily 
newspaper; if so, what do you read 
first?" These answers showed that the 
students were interested in many fields 
of non-fiction and that fiction was pre- 
ferred. With their answers in mind, 
the committee went through the stack 
collection at the library and selected 
books which they thought would an- 
swer the needs of these students. Also, 
they added books which would appeal 
to faculty and graduate students. In 
the future, selection suggestions will 
come direct from faculty, students, 
and the library staff. 

The function of the room is to de- 
velop pleasure reading to form an 
interest in good reading in such a way 
that students will turn instinctively to 
books as a source of pleasure in their 
leisure hours, to encourage apprecia- 
tion of books from a cultural aspect, 
and to encourage private libraries. 



SckoJof LAW 

Bv G. Kenneth Reiblich 



Ambassador David K. E. Bruce to 
Under Secretary of State 
n RESIDENT TRUMAN has nomi- 
■"^nated David K. E. Bruce, now 
Ambassador to France, to be Undersec- 
retary of State in succession to James 
E. Webb. Ambassador Bruce is a 
graduate of the School of Law. 

The Bruce appointment brings a 
trained diplomat, though not a profes- 
sional one, into the Undersecretary- 
ship. 

Bruce has had continuous service 
abroad for almost four years. His 
father, the late William Cabell Bruce, 
was Senator from Maryland, and a 
brother, James Bruce, was Ambassa- 
dor to Argentina. 

With O.S.S. 

David Bruce, now 53, tall, grave 
and distinguished-looking, sei - ved with 
the Office of Strategic Services in war- 
time, and later for a short time as 
Assistant Secretary of Commerce un- 
der W. Averell Harriman. 

When Harriman went to Paris at the 
start of the Marshall Plan, Bruce went 
with him as head of the Marshall Plan 
mission in France. President Truman 
promoted him to be Ambassador in 
May, 1949. 

He turned out to be one of the most 
popular American ambassadors ever 
sent to France and one of the most 
effective as well. 

Born in Baltimore on February 12, 
1898, he left Princeton in his sopho- 
more year to serve in World War I. 
He joined the Army as field artillery 
private in 1917, soon being promoted 
to second lieutenant. 

After the war, Mr. Bruce studied law 
at Maryland as well as Virginia. He 
practiced in Baltimore for a time, par+ 
of it with the firm of his father, the 
late Senator W. Cabell Bruce. He be- 
came a member of the Maryland State 
legislature in 1924, followed by two 
years in the Foreign Service. 

In 1942, he joined the Army Air 
Force. With the rank of colonel, he 
assisted in organizing the Office of 
Strategic Services and later became 
chief of the OSS in Europe, with head- 
quarters in London. 

In 1947 he was appointed Assistant 
Secretary of Commerce. In 1948, he 
was made ECA chief in France and 
deputy to W. Averell Harriman, then 
special representative to all the Mar- 
shall Plan countries. This service led 
naturally to his selection as Ambassa- 
dor to France the following year. 
Annual Banquet 

The Annual Banquet of the Law 
School Alumni Association has been 
scheduled for April 26, at 7:00 P. M. 
in the Emerson Hotel, Baltimore. De- 
tails of the event are to reach all 
alumni by letter in the near future. 
Nominations 

The nominating committee, appoint- 
ed by the President, Hon. John Grason 




UNDERSECRETARY 

Hon. David K. E. Bruce, Ambassador to 
France, veteran of both World Wars, former 
member of Maryland Legislature and former 
student at Maryland's School of Law. who has 
been appointed Undersecretary of State by 
President Truman. 



Turnbull '32, under the Chairmanship 
of Dr. Horace E. Flack, has presented 
to the Secretary the following list of 
officers for the Alumni Association in 
the year 1952-1953, to be elected by 
ballot at the annual banquet. 

President — Hon. C. Ferdinand Sy- 
bert '25, Ellicott City; 

1st Vice President — Edwin Harlan, 
Esq. '34, Baltimore; 

2nd Vice President — Hon. J. Dudley 
Digges '36, Upper Marlboro; 

3rd Vice President — James C. Mor- 
ton, Jr., Esq. '37, Annapolis; 

Secretary-Treasurer — G. Kenneth 
Reiblich, Esq. '29, Baltimore County; 

Executive Committee: Hon. William 
Horney '23, Hon. Stanford I. Hoff, '34, 
Leon H .A. Pierson, Esq. '23, J. Gil- 
beit Prendergast, Esq. '33, Benjamin 
Rosenstock, Esq. '25, Hon. J. Howard 
Murray '19, Enos S. Stockbridge, Esq. 
'10, T. Hughlett Henry, Jr., Esq. '34, 
Thomas B. Finan, Jr., Esq. '39, Joseph 
Bernstein, Esq. '18. 

Members of the Nominating Com- 
mittee, in addition to Dr. Flack were: 
Thomas N. Biddison, George H. Dowell, 
A. Frederick Taylor, and Edwin Lowe. 
Other nominees for the above offices 
to be eligible for the ballot must be 
presented by petition, signed by at 
least ten members of the association, 
and filed with the Secretary, G. Ken- 
neth Reiblich, School of Law, at least 
sixty days prior to the annual meeting. 
Ashman Scholarships 

The Faculty Council announced the 
awarding of the two Louis S. Ash- 
man scholarships to Joseph P. Alca- 
rese, a senior student in the Day 
Division of the Law School, who was 
again the recipient of one of the schol- 
arships, and the second one was award- 



[26] 



ed to William F. Mosner, also a senior 
student in the Day Division. Both of 
the students are former veterans, 
whose time under the GI Bill has ex- 
pired and who have maintained excel- 
lent scholastic records. 

This is the 30th year of the Ashman 
Scholarships at the University of 
Maryland Law School. Mr. Ashman, 
the author of a law book entitled 
"Prayers and Instructions," and other 
legal books, is completing another un- 
der the title of "Annotated Court 
Forms," and is in need of free research 
and typing to complete the publication 
of the book. 

Mr. Ashman recently contributed his 
19th pint of blood for wounded service- 
men. Mr. Ashman heads the legal 
firm of Ashman and Link. The latter, 
First Lieutenant William C. Link, was 
killed in action. However, his name 
remains associated with the firm by 
"previous arrangement." Such a "pre- 
vious arrangement" would exist in 
a situation controlled by a fellow who 
considers it a great privilege to give 19 
pints of blood as well as two scholar- 
ships each year to ex-G.I. students. 

Norman Kaufman, President 

At the Annual Election of Officers of 
the Assessors Association of Balti- 
more City, Norman Kaufmann, LL.B. 
'25, Real Estate Assesor, was elected 
President. Other officers elected were 
Thomas R. Miller, Vice President; Mil- 
ton A. Sorrell, Treasurer; S. Floyd 
Shenk, Secretary, and George M. 
Downs, Sergeant-at-Arms. 

The Association is composed of the 
assessing officials of Baltimore. It is 
affiliated with the National Association 
of Assessing Officers. 

National Book Award Judge 

Huntington Cairns, lawyer, author, 
and official of the National Gallery of 
Art, was one of the five judges who 
will select the outstanding non-fiction 
book of 1951, the National Book 
Awards in fiction, non-fiction, and 
poetry announced. 

Mr. Cairns, who is secretary, treas- 
urer, and general counsel of the 
National Gallery of 
Art, was born in 
Baltimore and, re- 
received his law de- 
gree from Mary- 
land's School of 
Law in 1925. He 
was in private prac- 
tice from 1926 to 
1937. 

Since then he has 
served the Treas- 
ury Department in 
several capacities, 
has lectured at the University and has 
been chairman of the radio program, 
"Invitation to Learning." 

His most widely known work has 
been as special legal advisor to the 
Treasury Department in which capac- 
ity he has, in effect, been the nation's 
official censor. He has examined hun- 
dreds of foreign books, films, and art 
works to determine whether they should 




Mr. Cairns 



be barred from entering this country. 
His opinions are purely advisory, but 
not one has ever been appealed to the 
courts. 

He is the author of "The Limits of 
Art," and "Legal Philosophy from 
Plato to Hegel" among others. 

Besides Mr. Cairns, the judges for 
the non-fiction prize of the National 
Book Awards are: Crane Brinton, 
Marquis W. Childs, Luther H. Evans, 
and Horace M. Kallen. The awards, 
rapidly becoming established as the 
nation's top literary honors, are being 
made for the third time. Last year the 
non-fiction award went to Newton Ar- 
vin for his study, "Herman Melville." 
The awards are sponsored by the 
American Book Publishers Council, 
the American Booksellers Association, 
and the Book Manufacturers' Institute. 



New Parking Rule 

The town council of College Park 
has voted to prohibit parking on 
the Washington-Baltimore Boulevard 
throughout the community with ex- 
ception of the one block strip on the 
west side of the highway from the 
south boundary of Maryland Univer- 
sity south to Knox Road. This block 
contains business establishments which 
have no other parking facilities and 
is seven feet wider than other sections 
of the highway. 

The ban is effective on a stretch of 
the road three miles long from Albion 
Road north to Edgewood Road. The 
ruling was made at the request of the 
Maryland Roads Commission as a 
safety measure and to cut down con- 
gestion. 

The council declined a Commission 
request to prohibit left turns from the 
northerly traffic flow into Knox Road, 
giving access to the College Park shop- 
ping center. Such a ban, the Commis- 
sion was told would be a decided detri- 
ment to the businessmen of College 
Park. 



Tri-De/f Honors 

Elizabeth Jane Smith of Takoma 
Park is known among alumni of Mont- 
gomery Blair High School as "Blair's 
Sweetheart of 1947," but it was in the 
category of brains rather than beauty 
that she was recognized for perform- 
ance at the University of Maryland 
when the Washington Alliance of Delta 
Delta Delta presented their top award, 
an engraved silver cup, to Miss Smith, 
selected as the Tri Delta 1950-51 senior 
who made the highest four-year aver- 
age at Maryland. 

Miss Smith was graduated with a 
major in bacteriology last June, and 
is now working toward her Master's 
degree on a research fellowship award- 
ed by the University. She had served 
as secretary of Sigma Alpha Omicron, 
bacteriology honorary society, secretary 
and Pan Hel representative for Tri- 
Delta, treasurer of the Woman's 
League, and a member of the Rally 
Committee and the Albright Otterbein 
Club. 



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i^otleae of 

EDUCATION 



By Pat Scanlan 



In Connecticut 

THERESA DUNN CRADDOCK '32 
(Ed.), is the new administrative 
officer of the Connecticut district office 
of Price Stabilization. A native of Balti- 
more, Mrs. Craddock was for several 
years associatd with the U. S. Employ- 
ment Service in Baltimore, Providence, 
R. I., Washington, D. C, and Denver, 
Colorado. 

In 1949 she was named to the re- 
search and statistical staff of the Com- 
mission on State Organizations. She 
later headed the speaker's bureau of 
the Citizen's Committee on State Or- 
ganization and served as the first 
President of the League of Women 
Voters in Berlin, Conn. 

As an administrative officer, Mrs. 
Craddock will head the management 
branch of OPS, one of the five major 
offices of the price control agency. 

The Craddock's have two children, 
Kenneth 5, and Gail 1V 2 . 

At Cornell 

Problems that test the beliefs of 
college students were discussed by a 
theologian, a humanist and a sociolo- 
gist in a symposium opening the an- 
nual campus conference on religion at 
Cornell. 

The speakers were Dr. Harold A. 
Bosley, dean of the Divinity School at 
Duke; Dr. Algernon D. Black, director 
of the Ethical Culture Society in New 
York City, and Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, 
director of the Institute for Child 
Study at Maryland and a former staff 
member of UNESCO's Seminar for 
Childhood Education. 

At Bowie State 

Dr. Wilbur Devilbiss, Dean of the 
College of Education, was guest speak- 
er at the monthly meeting of the Mary- 
land Society of Educational Pioneers, 
at Bowie State Teachers College. 

At Columbia 

Mr. Richard Byrne, Associate Pro- 
fessor of Education, in charge of guid- 
ance courses, will be on leave of ab- 
sence during the second semester to 
complete work for the doctorate at 
Teachers College, Columbia University. 

At Boston 

Several members of the College of 
Education staff will attend the meet- 
ing of the Association for Supervision 
and Curriculum Development, in Bos- 
ton. Dr. Daniel A. Prescott, Director 
of the Institute for Child Study, will 
deliver a speech; Dr. Hugh Perkins and 
Dr. John Green, members of the Insti- 
tute staff, will participate in the pro- 
gram. Dean Wilbur Devilbiss will 
serve as a discussion group leader. 



[28] 




AGRICULTURAL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 

UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND 



A £eJc/utich 



tykereai. a stately Chapel has been erected on a conspicuous hill on the Campus of the University 
of Maryland, and 

Wkei-eai, the Chapel will serve as a memorial to all students and graduates who gave their lives in 
defense of their country, in World War I and World War II, and 

WhcreaA. this memorial fondly represents the sentiments of all Alumni, in behalf of those heroes, 
and gives assurance to all who follow the moral standards of our University, and 

tyhettaA, it is a matter of pride that this artistically designed and magnificent Chapel is the only 
memorial of this type existing on the Campus of any Land Grant Institution in this Country, and 

WhereaA, Religious Services conducted in this Chapel will serve as an inspiration to students and 
faculty and strengthen the bonds of Alumni to their Alma Mater, and 

WketttJi, the President of the University and the Board of Regents are responsible for the erection 
of this Chapel, 

tfcU M It {\tACli)tfl, that the membership of the College of Agriculture Alumni Association, in 
meeting duly assembled on this third day of November, nineteen hundred and fifty-one, hereby 
expresses its deep appreciation to the President and the Board of Regents for this Memorial and 
Chapel and for the inspiration it will provide Alumnni present and future. 



IN APPRECIATION OF CHAPEL 

In recognition of the work being done on the new Chapel, a scroll was presented to the Board 
of Regents and Dr. H. C. Byrd, by President Abram Gottwalls, accompanied by the Officers and Board 
of the Agricultural Alumni Association. This beautifully worded commendation, drafted by Dr. 
T. B. Symons for the Alumni, is shown above. 



L^otleae ot 

AGRICULTURE 



In Costa Rica 

GEORGE QUIROS '51, is assisting 
in the organization of a Univer- 
sity Club at San Jose, Costa Rica, 
consisting of Costa Ricans and Amer- 
icans who have attended or graduated 
from an American University or Col- 
lege. A broad invitation of hospitality 
is extended Alumni, and it is the be- 
lief of such as Senor Quiros that the 
Club will be able to increase oppor- 
tunities for Alumni to further estab- 
lish and maintain both their own 
mutual friendships and the ties be- 
tween the United States and Costa 
Rica. 

Class of '98 
Edgar Suter McCeney of Washing- 
ton, D. C, graduated from Maryland 
Agricultural College in 1898 and is 
still leading a very active life. At the 
Request of the Alumni 
Office, he has sent the 
following intere sting 
summary: 

A native of Prince 
George's County, Mr. 
McCeney was born in 
1874 and was married in 
1901. He has three sons 
and seven grandchil- 
Mr. McCeney dren. His wife was the 
former Nanny Ogle Bird. Mr. Mc- 
Ceney was born on "Thoopland" Farm, 




the home of the Bowie's since 1707. 
He returned to the farm following his 
years in room 23 of the old Barracks 
at M. A. C. His roommates were J. 
Hanson Mitchell, and Aquilla Turner. 

In 1906, Mr. McCeney accepted a 
position with the American National 
Bank. He resigned in 1916 to become 
the first attendance officer with the 
Board of Education in Prince George's 
County, and later accepted a position 
in the office of the County Commis- 
sioner. Mr. McCeney also served as 
Chief Clerk in the office of the Asses- 
sor of Prince George's County until 
1930. In 1933 he was appointed man- 
ager of the apartment house of the 
"Real Estate Department of the Na- 
tional Savings and Trust Company," a 
position which he holds today. 
In Korea 

A Miami veterinarian who helped 
rebuild war-shattered livestock produc- 
tion in Greece, Formosa, and Japan is 
now serving with the United Nations 
Civil Assistance Command in Korea 
(UNCACK). 

Dr. Robert C. Reisinger, Miami, is in 
Korea to conduct experiments to de- 
veloping vaccines against hog cholera 
and poultry-killing "Newcastle dis- 
ease." 

Dr. Reisinger attended the Univer- 
sity of Maryland (Ag. '39 & '40) and is 
a graduate in veterinary medicine of 
Alabama Polytechnic Institute, Auburn. 
He served in the artillery in World 
War II. 

Reisinger accompanied the first UN 
shipment of cattle to Greece in 1945. 
In 1949 he went to Formosa with the 
U. S. Economic Cooperation Adminis- 



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[29] 




MILK IS BETTER 
In GLASS Bottles 

From the standpoint of good 
judgment you should SEE the 
milk you buy — its Quality and 
Quantity. From the standpoint 
of economics you should in- 
sist on receiving it in GLASS 
bottles. 

The life of a GLASS milk bot- 
tle is 39 round trips (U. S. 
Dept. of Agriculture) and its 
cost then is less than *4 cent 
per trip per quart; substitute 
containers cost two cents each 
and can make only one trip. 
Someone must absorb this cost 
difference — 8 times. 

INSIST ON YOUR MILK 
in GLASS Bottles 

There is no substitute as good. 

THE BUCK GLASS CO. 

Fort Ave. & Lawrence St. 
Baltimore 30, Md. 



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Fine Executive Desks and Chairs 

Leather Club Chairs and 

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Filing Cabinets 

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tration to combat an outbreak of "'cat- 
tle plague." He also conducted an 
extensive hog cholera vaccination pro- 
gram there. 

Dr. Reisinger came to Korea last 
October with the United Nations Korea 
Reconstruction Agency. The organi- 
zation works in close cooperation with 
UNCACK. 

At that time he made a survey of 
Korea's cattle population. Reisinger 
announced recently that there is no 
necessity for immediate restocking of 
the herds. 

Commenting on the efforts of the 
Koreans to help themselves, Dr. Reis- 
inger said, "Korean veterinarians are 
working very diligently with the lim- 
ited material and instruments they 
have." 

He added that the Reds had pillaged 
the nation's medical and veterinary 
supplies, and that whatever equipment 
is now in Korea came through 
UNCACK. 

Before coming to Korea Dr. Reis- 
inger was assistant chief of the vet- 
erinary affairs division, Department of 
Army, in Tokyo. 

Academy Electee 
Dr. Ernest N. Cory, (pictured here- 
with) State Entomologist and member 

of the Uni- 
v e r s i t y's 
At h 1 e t i c 
Board of 
C o n t r ol, 
(Ag. '09), 
was elected 
to member- 
ship in the 
Washington 
Academy of 
Sci e n c e s. 
This elec- 
tion was in 
recogniti o n 
of Dr. Cory's 
accomplish- 
ments in re- 
search, 
tea c h i n g 
and regula- 
entomology, 
aid in devel- 




Dr. Cory 



tory work in Maryland 
training of entomologists, 
opment of the American Association of 
Economic Entomologists and the Jour- 
nal of Economic Entomology, numer- 
ous publications, and assistance with 
publications of others. 

John D. Rieck 

Pvt. John R Rieck, (Agr. '49), has 
completed processing at the 2053d Re- 
ception Center at Fort Meade and has 
been assigned to the 101st Airborne 
Division, Camp Breckinridge, Ky., for 
Army basic training. 

He was graduated from the Univer- 
sity of Mayland, College Park Md., in 
1949 with a Bachelor of Science degree 
in agriculture economics. 

Extension Dairyman 

John R. Schabinger, former Cecil 
County agent, has been appointed Ex- 
tension dairyman for the University, 
J. W. Pou, head of the Dairy Depart- 
ment, announced. 

The new Extension dairyman re- 
places Marvin E. Senger, resigned to 



join the dairy Extension staff of North 
Carolina State College. 

Mr. Schabinger served as county 
agent in Cecil County since March of 
this year. Prior to that he was assis- 
tant agent in Carroll County for three 
years. 

He holds a M.S. degree in dairying 
from Penn State and a B.S. from Dela- 
ware. 

Mueller County Agent 

Raymond G. Mueller, assistant 
county agent in Washington County, 
has been named Cecil County agent, 
Dr. James M. Gwin, director of the 
University of Maryland Extension Ser- 
vice, announced. 

Mr. Mueller served Washington 
County for the last six years, receiv- 
ing training under the direction of 
Washington County Agent Mark 
Miller. 

Mr Mueller will fill the post formerly 
held by J. R. Schabinger, who joined 
the University staff at College Park as 
Extension dairyman. 

A graduate of the University of 
Maryland, Mr. Mueller was awarded a 
B.S. degree in agricultural education, 
in 1943. 

Job Placement 

The new officers and board of direc- 
tors of the Agricultural Alumni Asso- 
ciation, at their first meeting, under- 
took a new project whereby they are 
establishing a Job Placement and Op- 
portunity Service which is intended to 
aid graduates who wish to change jobs 
as well as aid prospective employers in 
obtaining qualified personnel for spe- 
cialized fields. 

Seek Aid 

Members of the Maryland Horticul- 
tural Society passed a resolution at 
their Hagerstown convention to ask 
the State for a $10,000 grant for the 
University of Maryland to study the 
effects of weather on fruits and vege- 
tables. 

The group also backed increase of 
funds for the University experimental 
laboratory at Hancock, Md., but men- 
tioned no specific amount. 

About 200 horticulturists attended 
the meeting. A. F. Vierheller, Uni- 
versity of Maryland, was elected secre- 
tary-treasurer. 

Poultry Judging Awards 

The University's poultry judging 
team won second place in the 28th An- 
nual Eastern Intercollegiate Poultry 
Judging Contest held in the Grand 
Central Palace, New York City. Coach- 
ed by Professor George D. Quigley, the 
team was composed of F. Russell 
Young, Frederick; Josephine A. Blair, 
Owings Mills; and Richard W. Fadeley, 
Waterford, Va. The contest was won 
by Cornell University. In the indivi- 
dual honors Maryland students were 
all within the cash prize group. Rus- 
sell Young, Richard Fadeley and Jose- 
phine Blair won awards. The Mary- 
land team also won a gold loving cup. 
Calvert Speaker 

Dr. Paul E. Nystrom, Head Agri- 
cultural Education and Marketing, was 
the principal speaker at the Calvert 
County Farm Bureau banquet. 



[30] 



Dr. Nystrom, former County Agent 
Leader of Maryland and Assistant to 
Dr. Byrd, President of the University 
of Maryland, is well known throughout 
Maryland among farm people. He is 
credited with giving much of his time 
and efforts in initiating a program of 
successful farming throughout Mary- 
land. 

Sincere and interesting, Dr. Nystrom 
is always ready and willing to lend ar, 
ear to people who are confronted with 
farm problems and devotes his time 
to the solution of problems pertaining 
to agriculture. 

Nurserymen Honor Byrd 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, president of the Uni- 
ersity, described as a "friend" of 
Maryland nurserymen for more than 
twenty years, was presented a gavel 
made from wood of the Eastern Shore's 
famous Wye Oak at the annual meet- 
ing of the Maryland Nurserymen's As- 
sociation. Presentation was made by 
Paul S. Hoffman, association secretary. 



Job Placement Service 

The Placement Service of the Uni- 
versity is well under way in its third 
year. Although the service is ren- 
dered primarily to seniors in the cur- 
rent graduating class, it is also open 
to alumni. In fact, several good jobs 
during the past year have gone beg- 
ging because there has been no one on 
our registers qualified to handle jobs 
requiring maturity and experience. To 
get this service free of charge it is 
only necessary for alumni to register 
and to fill out forms giving needed in- 
formation to placement service. Those 
interested should write to Lewis M. 
Knebel, Director, Administration Build- 
ing. 

There have been some interesting 
placements made recently. Spencer 
Wright, June 1950, is very happy in 
his new job with Garwood Industries, 
Inc., of Washington, makers of heavy 
construction equipment. Spence will 
start as a salesman with a very sub- 
stantial salary and plans to get into 
management work. His present em- 
ployers were very much impressed by 
his background) in both engineering 
and public accounting as a preparation 
for sales and management. Spence 
went into public accounting immedi- 
ately with the idea of getting a good 
knowledge of how business operates 
before going into sales. It has paid off 
for him. 

Walter Taylor, June 1950, a Per- 
sonnel Major, is now the Business As- 
sistant to the Director of the American 
Psychology Association in Washing- 
ton. Walter will handle all business 
affairs of this national professional as- 
sociation leaving the director free to 
promote the professional services. 

Hiram S. Coppage has gone with 
Carbide & Carbon Chemical Co., Oak 
Ridge, Tennessee. 

L. Laurer went to the Research En- 
gineering labs of IBM in Endicott, 
New York. 



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L^olleae of 

MILITARY 
SCIENCE 



IT seems that good things come in 
bunches or maybe that years of 
earnest effort are paying off for the 
University. Its great football team has 
walked off with top honors on the 
gridiron. Its track, boxing and soccer 
teams are acknowledged as among 
the country's best. The college in gen- 
eral is coming of age scholastically 
with more and more recognition being 
given its departments. 

A Great Record 

Among these honors paid the Uni- 
versity is the awarding of 10% of 
all regular Air Force commissions 
given to AF ROTC graduates of the 
class of 1952, to University of Mary- 
land's students. These commissions 
are awarded, and the word is rightly 
used, to the top scholars of the AF 
ROTC graduates, nation-wide. That 
thirteen of our students were so select- 
ed speaks well for the reputation which 
the University has gained for itself. 

How does a student obtain a regu- 
lar commission and with it a lucrative 
and interesting lifetime career? The 
Air Force directive which provides for 
the designation of Distinguished Mili- 
tary Students is very cold and metho- 
dical in its content. A student, in or- 
der to be designated, must be in the 
upper half of his academic class with- 
in his college, in the upper third of 
his military specialty and possess those 
attributes desirable in a regular offi- 
cer. The Air Force goes one step fur- 
ther however. It states that a stu- 
dent so designated must be active in 
campus activities and must have con- 
tributed to the betterment of his 
school. 

Few Designated 

At the end of his junior year a stu- 
dent is designated. The designations 
are few and far between. Of the six 
hundred advanced students only twen- 
ty-five were so designated for this 
school year. 

Eighteen of these twenty-five boys 
made application for their regular ap- 
pointments. They underwent bio- 
graphical testing and appeared before 
a board of officers from other schools. 
Their applications were then forward- 
ed to Headquarters USAF where a 
board of officers made their selections 
from applications submitted from over 
180 AF ROTC schools, nation-wide. 

The students were then notified by 
letter of their selection contingent 
upon their graduation. 

Glancing over names of the boys 
chosen, one can hardly be surprised 
at the board's selection. 

The following named students re- 
ceived appointments as regular Air 
Force officers: 



[32] 



William R. Graham, a member of the 
Arnold Air Society, the Flying Club, 
and the Scabbard and Blade, has made 
application for Pilot Training. Mr. Gra- 
ham resides at Glen Echo, Maryland. 

Eugene R. Mitz, a member of the 
Scabbard and Blade, Arnold Air So- 
ciety, and Sigma Alpha Epsilon, re- 
sides at Beltsville, Maryland. 

James William Bannerman, a mem- 
ber of the Arnold Air Society and the 
Student Chapter A.S.M.E., has made 
application for Pilot Training. Mr. 
Bannerman resides at College Park, 
Maryland. 

Norman K. Hargett, a member of the 
Arnold Air Society, A.C.S. Student 
Affiliate, and Al. Ch. E. Student Affili- 
ates, resides in Baltimore, Maryland. 
Requests Pilot Training 

Edgar F. Puryear, a member of the 
Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity, has 
made application for Pilot Training. 
Mr. Puryear resides in Silver Spring, 
Maryland. 

William Bastedo, a member of the 
Arnold Air Society, Delta Tau Delta 
Fraternity, Newman Club, S.G.A. 
Committees, and the Military Ball 
Committee, resides at Miami Beach, 
Florida. 

Clarence (Chick) B. Fry, a member 
of the Alpha Tau Omega Fraternity, 
vice-president of the senior class of 
1952, and vice president of campus var- 
sity "M-Club", has had three years of 
varsity football, and has made applica- 
tion for Pilot Training. Mr. Fry re- 
sides at Reading, Pennsylvania. 

Gene N. Chomko, a member of the 
Arnold Air Society and Scabbard and 
Blade, resides at Olyphant, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Frank R. Young, a member of the 
Lutheran Student Association, the Stu- 
dent Religious Council, the Arnold Air 
Society, and the Poultry Science Club, 
resides at Frederick, Maryland. 

From Easton 

John H. Anderson, a member of 
Alpha Zeta and the Arnold Air Society, 
resides at Easton, Maryland. 

David C. Brotemarkle, an applicant 
for Pilot Training, resides at Cam- 
bridge, Maryland. 

Robert T. Carpenter, a member of 
the Tau Beta Pi, and Phi Eta Sigma, 
Student Chapter of American Institute 
of Chemical Engineers, Student Affili- 
ates of the American Chemical So- 
ciety, and the Arnold Air Society, re- 
sides at Frederick, Maryland. 

Walter J. Davis, a member of the 
Sigma Pi Sigma, the Physics Club, 
and the Pershing Rifles, resides at Sil- 
ver Spring, Maryland. 

To Lieutenant Colonel 

Alfred Collins has been promoted to 
the rank of lieutenant colonel in Korea. 



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Colonel Collins is secretary to the 
Eighth Army General Staff, and had 
the silver leaves pinned on by Gen- 
eral James A. Van Fleet, command- 
ing general of the Eighth Army. 

The colonel was first stationed in 
Japan in July 1950 and came to Korea 
in July 1951. 

He did two years of post graduate 
work in military science and tactics 
at the University of Maryland, '49 and 
'50. He is a graduate of Temple. 

He entered active Army service in 
1941 and served as the adjutant of the 
338th Infantry Regiment of the 85th 
Division. While with the 338th he was 
awarded the Combat Infantryman 
Badge, Bronze Star Medal with Oak 
Leaf Cluster, Distinguished Unit Em- 
blem and the Purple Heart for wounds 
received in action. 



Reorganization 



Changes in the organization of the 
University of Maryland Admissions 
Office, and arrangements for closer 
coordination with other work of the 
University, were effected by the 
appointment of G. Watson Algire, 
High School Supervisor of the Board 
of Education of Kent County since 
1947, to be director of Admissions, with 
Dr. Long, who has been Director of 




Dr. Long Mr. Algire 

Admissions, becoming Dean of Stu- 
dents. In his new capacity, Dr. Long 
will have charge of coordination of the 
work of both the Admissions Office and 
the Registrar's Office, and will also or- 
ganize a Counseling Department in 
connection with these two offices. Miss 
Alma H. Preinkert will continue in 
her present position as Registrar. 

Under the new arrangement, the 
University will institute a check sys- 
tem of counseling which will keep close 
supervision of each student's work 
after the student enters the Univer- 
sity. Even though some students en- 
ter the University with high records, 
for one reason or another, they do not 
do good work. Under the new system, 
Dr. Long's office will keep a check on 
students after they enter and will 
counsel them if they begin to fall be- 
low the standards that their entrance 
requirements indicate should be main- 
tained. 

(Concluded on page 35) 



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L^olleae of 

Business & Public 
Administration 

By Egbert F. Tingley '27 



Book on Brooks Adams 

»R. THORNTON Anderson of the 
Department of Government and 
Politics, (B. P. A.), is the author of a 
recently-published intellectual biogra- 
phy of Brooks Adams. 

The course of Brooks Adams' think- 
ing is traced from the early years when 
he was swept along in nineteenth-cen- 
tury optimism and laissez faire to his 
final theories after World War I of 
pessimism and Marxian collectivism. 
The author considers first the influ- 
ences and associations of Adams' 
school days, particularly at Harvard, 
to find what key they may hold to his 
later theories. There is reason to be- 
historical research and his ideas on 
education were beginning to be formu- 
lated in this period. It is, however, 
to the analysis and criticism of Adams' 
works that Professor Anderson devotes 
the greater part of his book. 

Brooks Adams was a conservative in 
politics. He wished to preserve the 
good of the past, but he felt that to 
preserve a way of life, a civilization, it 
is necessary continually to alter it, to 
destroy and recreate it, to keep it 
abreast of the times. "That nation," 
he wrote, "thrives best which is most 
flexible, and which has fewest preju- 
dices to hamper adaptation." Pro- 
fessor Anderson believes that some of 
Adams' most original thinking, even 
influencing that of his brother Henry, 
was done in the field of public admin- 
istration. 

To Fort Knox 

Pvt. John C. Grimmer, 23, who grad- 
uated from the College of B. & P. A. 
last June with a Bachelor of Science 
degree in transportation, has complet- 
ed processing at the 2053rd Reception 
Center at Ft. Meade and assigned for 
Army basic training at Fort Knox, 
Kentucky. Prior to induction he was 
employed in the ticket offices of Amer- 
ican Airlines. 

Housing officer 

Capt. David M. Snyder has been ap- 
pointed officer in charge of housing 
and building at headquarters of the 
Seventh Army in Stuttgart, Germany. 

He graduated from the College of 
Business and Public Administration 
in 1944. He had previously been serv- 
ing as battalion personnel officer in 
the Forty-Third Division. 

Security Conference 
A state-wide conference on "Secur- 
ity of the Individual" was held at the 
University, under the joint auspices of 
the College of Business and Public Ad- 
minstration and the Maryland Chapter, 
International Association Public Em- 
ployment Services. 



The security program in Maryland 
was the main subject of discussion at 
the meetings. Topics covered were un- 
employment, veterans' pension plans 
and other benefits for employees in 
the state. 

Dr. H. C. Byrd, president of the Uni- 
versity, gave the opening address. 

Dr. H. F. Sylvester, professor in 
Business and Public Administration, 
in charge of the project, delivered a 
speech on "Bill of Rights for the Indi- 
vidual." 

Other speakers were William H. Ma- 
haney, Chairman, Department of Em- 
ployment Security; D. L. B. Fringer, 
Director, Employment Service Divis- 
ion; Paul L. Morsberger, Chief of 
Benefits, Unemployment Compensation 
Division; J. Milton Patterson, Director, 
State Department of Public Welfare; 
Melvin Fine, Chairman, State Indus- 
trial Accident Commission; Dr. Harold 
F. Sylvester, Professor of Personnel 
Administration, University of Mary- 
land; Col. Stanwood, State Director, 
Selective Service; Grafton Lee Brown, 
Staff Field Representative, Veterans 
Employment Service; Mr. Altmeyer, 
Commissioner, Social Security Board; 
Wilbur Cohen, Chairman, Health, Wel- 
fare and Pension Panel; R. C. Thomp- 
son, Director, Vocational Rehabilita- 
tion, and Rev. J. H. Tackett, Washing- 
ton Grove Presbyterian Church. 

To Warren, Pa. 

Robert Grogan '49, who has served 
as Vice-President of the Alumni Club 
of New York, and as Chairman of the 
Membership Committee, has just 
moved to Warren, Pa., for an assign- 
ment with the National Advertising 
Company. 

Bob writes to say, "I would appreci- 
ate just a line or two in 'MARYLAND' 
to thank all of my New York Alumni 
friends for their support in connection 
with our Club and to extend to them 
my regrets for having to leave such 
a fine organization." 

We take this opportunity to wish 
Bob the best of success and to express 
the appreciation of the Alumni Associ- 
ation for his unusually fine Alumni 
work. 

In Van Nuys, Cal. 

Calling attention to information re- 
garding him that is definitely "dated" 
Robert M. Neiman, (B. & P. A. '39) 
writes to advise he heads the Neiman- 
Reed Lumber Co., 13301 Burbank 
Boulevard, Van Nuys, Cal. 

Bob is in business, and successfully, 
with his former Marine Corps Fourth 
Tank Battalion Executive Officer, Ma- 
jor Bob Reed, USMCR. They operate 
wholesale and retail lumber and ply- 
wood businesses. 

Last May Neiman married the for- 
mer Suzy Alexander, Moundsville, 
W. Va. about which time Bob was also 
promoted to the rank of Lieutenant 
Colonel in the Marine Corps Reserve. 

"I run across Marines all the time 
out here," writes Colonel Neiman, 
"but none from Maryland. Remember 
me, if you see them, particularly to 
Frank Cronin and Benny Alperstein." 






[34] 



At Fort Monroe 

Lt. Col. John E. Boothe, Jr., has 
reported for duty at Fort Monroe. 

He has been assigned to the Re- 
search and Development Section of the 
Office, Chief of Army Field Forces. 

Colonel Boothe graduated in 1937 
with a Bachelor of Arts degree in 
business administration. 

The last assignment of Colonel 
Boothe was as a battalion commander 
in the 24th Infantry Regiment in 
Korea. He joined the 7th Infantry Di- 
vision in 1950. 

During World War II he served in 
Italy and participated in the Rome 
Arno, Appenines and Po Valley cam- 
paigns. In Korea Colonel Boothe took 
part in the UN Offensive and Defensive, 
the Chinese Communist Intervention, 
the First UN Counteroffensive and the 
Chinese Communist Counteroffensive. 

In addition to service ribbons, he 
wears the Bronze Star Medal with an 
Oak-Leaf Cluster, the Combat Infantry 
Badge and a Republic of Korea Unit 
Citation. 



Reorganization 



(Concluded from page 33) 

The changes are part of a broad plan 
of educational reorganization to en- 
able the University to do the highest 
possible grade of work, which has been 
quietly going on for some time and 
which is calculated to keep the Uni- 
versity in a realistic position as to the 
educational needs of the state and 
country. 

Mr. Algire received his A.B. degree 
in 1930 and his Master's degree in 
1931, both from the University of 
Maryland. He taught science in St. 
Michael's High School and the Fred- 
erick High School, and in 1944 was ap- 
pointed principal of Hampstead High 
School. He is a member of the Amer- 
ican Association of School Administra- 
tors. 

Dr. Long joined the faculty of the 
University of Maryland in 1925, serv- 
ing as Professor in Education. He 
was awarded a B.S. degree from Blue 
Ridge College in 1911, a Master's de- 
gree from the University of Kansas 
in 1916 and a Ph.D. from Johns Hop- 
kins in 1922. A past chapter president 
of the American Association of Univer- 
sity Professors, Dr. Long is a membei 
of the National So- 
ciety for the Teach- 
ing of Education, 
Phi Beta Kappa, 
Phi Kappa Phi and 
Alpha Gamma Rho. 
Miss Preinkert, 
University Regis- 
trar since 1935, has 
been a member of 
the Maryland facul- 
ty since 1919. She 
received an A.B. de- 
gree from George 
Washington in 1918 and an M.A. in 
1923 from the University of Maryland. 
• •■*•*•*****•* 
ADMIRAL C. W. NIMITZ:— 
"The greatest iveapon we brought to 
bear on the enemy was EDUCATION." 




Preinkert 



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ARTS & 
SCIENCES 

By Frederick S. DeMarr 



Letter from Turkey 

DR. RAY EHRENSBERGER, for 
a number of years head of the 
speech department of the University, 
is on a year's leave of absence to the 
State Department and serving as di- 
rector of the Bi-National Center, in 
Ankara, Turkey. In response to re- 
quests from the Alumni Secretary, he 
wrote: 

"It hardly seems possible that I've 
been over here in the Middle East 
nearly seven 
months and that 
soon I'll be coming 
back. But when you 
work 12 hours a 
day and meet a new 
and challe n g i n g 
problem every day 
time slips by rap- 
idly. 

"Right now it is 
snowing — our first 
of the year — and 
we may be in for 
one of those famous 

A I. Dr. Ehrensberger 

n k a r a winters. 

Ankara is nearly 4,000 feet high and 
surrounded by mountains, so if it is a 
bad season we really catch it. For 
weeks the mountains around have been 
covered with snow but in Ankara we 
have had excellent weather. Last sum- 
mer it would get up in the 90's and 
then at night drop as much as 30 de- 
grees. 

Toured Middle East 

"As you know, before I came here, 1 
visited all over the Middle East, and 
I was in Teheran during one of their 
numerous riots. My main recollection 
of Teheran is not 'oil' but dysentery. 
During the summer I drove hundreds 
of miles all over Syria, Trans-Jordan, 
Palestine, Lebanon, etc. The anti- 
American feeling in the Arab world 
is bitter and it all dates back to our 
foreign policy regarding the splitting 
of Palestine. I am afraid that foi 
years to come we'll pay some sort of 
price for this 'mistake.' The desig- 
nation 'mistake' is my personal view 
and not official. At the present mo- 
ment Egypt is stirred up. Damascus 
just had a bloodless revolution, and the 
whole Arabic world is restless. Here 
you have a tremendous power vacuum 
and I certainly don't know the answer. 

"Turkey is 98 r /r Moslem. However, 
they have drifted away from the Arab 
World and now are about to become 
a member of the Atlantic Pact. The 
standard of living in Turkey is fantas- 
tically low, but by comparison with 
the Arab States it is very high. Tur- 
key, by any of our modern standards, 



[36] 




AT WALTER REED GENERAL HOSPITAL 

Dan Rice. '43, and Tom Orpwood, '48, left to rieht, above, A. & S. graduates, are now Infor- 
mation Specialists with the Walter Reed Hospital Armed Forces Radio Station in Washington, D. C. 

Orpwood, who revived Kappa Alpha's "Cotton Picker's Minstrel" while at College Park, and 
Rice, one-time program director of the University's Old Line Network, are now helping to provide 
bedside radio entertainment for the more than 2,000 Korean veterans and other patients at the 
military hospital. 

The Walter Reed Radio Station is responsible for visits of topflight personalities from the world 
of sports and entertainment. Among the celebrities who have appeared recently at Walter Reed 
are: heavyweight champ, Jersey Joe Wolcott ; singers Rosemary Clooney and Eddie Fisher: as well 
as actress. Eve Arden. The station, whose call letters are WRAH, is an affiliate of the Armed Forces 
Radio Service which provides programs for American servicemen the world over. Dan and Tom and 
their associates, supplement the AFRS program with up-to-the-minute coverage of world news and 
shows of local interest. 

Rice was among the first six to graduate from Maryland with a major in speech, while Orpwood, 
who wrote the music for two varsity shows, was a political science major. 



is almost primitive but again, in com- 
parison to the Arab States, extremely 
advanced. The Turks are going ahead 
and trying which is more than one can 
say for many near-by states. 

"My family arrived last August and 
I believe are adjusted. Helen was hor- 
rified when she encountered her first bed 
bug, but soon she found out these little 
playmates were just a part of life 
here. I tried to explain that these lit- 
tle bed fellows did not recognize finan- 
cial standing, social position, or per- 
sonal habits. She was convinced when 
she won a door prize at a Country Club 
Party. Mrs. Arnold (wife of the Com- 
manding General here) presented her 
with the prize — one DDT bomb. 

Modern, He Says 
"But don't let me give you the 
wrong impression. We actually live 
in a very modern, comfortable apart- 
ment. The Fletchers (Ed. played foot- 
ball at Maryland in '34-'35, and June 
(A. & S. '36), was May Queen in '35), 
live upstairs. The PX is well stocked (at 
times) and plenty of activities are held 
for Americans. Life in Ankara is very 
pleasant when the lights don't go off or 
the water ceases to trickle out of the 
spigot. All in all one suffers no real 
hardship of any sort. Ankara is a 
modern city in every respect, but it is 



certainly not Turkey. 

"In direct contrast to Ankara, last 
week-end I took off in the car for a 
mountain village about 75 miles from 
here. After I left the one main road I 
nearly wrecked the car going another 
ten miles. I forded three streams, 
plunged through mud holes, got out 
and moved boulders, and without 
chains would never have made it. Now 
the purpose of this trip was to attend 
the wedding of a young boy who works 
in my building. He is typical of the 
villagers, a few who drift to the city 
to work. Turkey is 80% peasants 
who live in 45,000 villages. And few- 
villages have roads, good schools, elec- 
tricity, sanitation, or anything at all. 
Most houses are made of mud bricks, 
and life is really primitive. 
Rough Going 

"But to get back to the wedding trip. 
Arrangements got fouled up and no 
horses met us so my assistant and I 
started off on foot. We followed a 
mountain stream for some distance 
and then started climbing. We even- 
tually made the village and since I 
was the first foreigner to ever visit 
here they really rolled out the red 
carpet. I stayed over night and was 
the honored guest. Ataturk may have 
emancipated the women of Turkey by 
law, but out in the country they are 

[37] 




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anything but emancipated. I haven't 
the slightest idea of what the bride 
looked like because she was covered 
more than an Egyptian mummy. As a 
matter of fact the women of the village 
were never allowed out during my en- 
tire stay — it was strictly a man's show. 
Even the bride's father 'represented' 
her at the ceremony and promised to 
love and obey. Returning home I was 
furnished a horse, but in retrospect I 
think I would have been wiser to walk. 
Even Roy Rogers would have had a 
hard time riding down this mountain 
in almost pitch darkness (we started 
at 4 A. M.) and our only light was 
from a boy on a burro ahead holding a 
lantern. 

"So you see Turkey is a land of 
great contrasts. Street cars, paved 
streets, taxis, modern apartments, etc. 
in the few cities, and just a few miles 
away you will find ox drawn carts, 
paths, mud huts, and life as it has ex- 
isted for centuries. 

Good Fighter 

"I won't go into the 'war situation' 
as the American press is full of stories 
daily about the Tough Turk. I'll simp- 
ly say that he'll fight the Russian any 
day, any time, any place. He simply 
doesn't like the Russian and that's 
that. 

"Regardless of their attitude and 
personal bravery modern wars are 
fought with equipment and supplies, 
and although the picture is improving 
here a great deal remains to be done. 

"As you know I've been pretty lucky 
in getting around this old globe a 
great deal. When I finish this assign- 
ment I'll be about ready to settle down. 
This was one section of the world I 
had never visited, and was one of the 
main reasons why I came over. My 
thinking may have lost some of its ob- 
jectivity during the past several 
months, however, by being in this spot 
I am more convinced than ever that 
the Middle East is a very critical place. 
If this section of the world goes down 
as China did God help us! It is 
obvious we are buying time with 
money. I hope we don't run out of 
time or money." 

To Navy OCS 

Jerome L. O'Brien '51 (A. & S., 
Zoology), of Washington, Pa., has been 
selected for training in the Navy's offi- 
cer candidate class, Newport, R. I. 

Writes Lieutenant Commander James 
S. Milliken, Procurement Officer: 

"The selection of this young man 
reflects credit upon the thorough and 
well rounded education which he ob- 
tained in your institution since stand- 
ards set for selection are high. 

"We feel that the credit belongs 
largely to the educational institution 
he represents. Your cooperation in 
connection with our program is appre- 
ciated." 

Promoted at Trinity 

Dr. Edwin N. Nilson, who taught 
mathematics at Maryland, was re- 
cently promoted to associate professor 
of mathematics at Trinity College, 
Hartford, Conn. He received his M.A. 
and Ph.D. from Harvard. He also 



Mount Holyoke College. 
At Easton 

An exhibition of oil and water color 
taught mathematics at Harvard and 
painting by Professor James P. Whar- 
ton, Head of the Department of Art, 
was shown at Easton Art Galleries at 
Easton. 

At Walter Reed 
Drs. Walter A. Konetzka and 
Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., of the Depart- 
ment of Bacteriology, spoke at the 
183rd meeting of the Washington 
Bianch of the Society of American 
Bacteriologists at the Walter Reed 
Army Medical Center. They discussed 
"Bacterial Degradation of Alpha-Coni- 
dendrin." 

In Service 
Arthur P. Brigham (A. & S. '50), 
Editor of the Maryland News at Sil- 
ver Spring, former copy editor of the 
Diamondback, has just gone to Cali- 
fornia for future assignment with 
Uncle Sam. "Brig" was inducted in 
early January. He was made Editor- 
in-Chief of the News in the Fall of 
1950, and has been handling copy for 
three separate Smith newspapers. 
Other activities have included a direc- 
torship in the Maryland Press Asso- 
ciation, the Vice-Presidency of the 
Montgomery County Press Association, 
and membership in the Lions Club, the 
Order of Moose, and the Silver Spring 
Board of Trade. 

Annapolis Honors 
David H. Wallace who received a 
Master of Science degree in zoology in 
1937 and was formerly chairman of the 
Maryland Tidewater Fisheries Commis- 
sion, was recently named the "Outstand- 
ing Young Man of 1951" in Annapolis. 
The honor came to Mr. Wallace 
from the Junior Association of Com- 
merce. He is presently director of 
the Oyster Institute and lives in Bay 
Ridge. He was active in organizing 
the Citizens Committee of Anne Arun- 
del County, a group interested in good 
government. 

This is the second year for the award, 
which went to Eddy Erdelatz, Naval 
football coach, in 1950. 
Promoted 

Dr. Arthu r B. 
Hershberger '32, a 
former president of 
the Arts and Sci- 
ences Alumni Chap- 
ter, manager of the 
Chemical Products 
^L section, Domestic 
j&d Sales Dept., Atlan- 
w^k\ tic Refining 

A I pany, Philadel- 

BH I phia, Pa., has just 
Dr. Hershberger been named Man- 
ager of the Company's Products Sales 
Division. 

At New Orleans 
George Openshaw '32, was a visitor 
to the Alumni Headquarters and the 
Sugar Bowl Game in New Orleans. He 
is now with the First National Bank 
at Laurel, Miss. In a letter to Dean 
Eppley, prior to the game, he called 
a shot when he said, "Tennessee has 
really got a team, or I should say 



[::s| 



about four teams, but I don't think 
anything but emancipated. I haven't 
Maryland won't be able to handle." 
Openshaw is remembered at Maryland 
as President of the Economic Society, 
Secretary of the Scabbard and Blade, 
and a Captain in the ROTC. 
In Costa Rica 

William Stedman, Jr. (A. & S. '42), 
recently wrote from the American 
Embassy at San Jose, Costa Rica to 
send a subscription to "MARYLAND" 
and to let us know that he and his wife 
Janet Andreae, of the same class, are 
interested in keeping abreast of Alumni 
activities. He extended a cordial in- 
vitation to any Alumni passing 
through Costa Rica to visit him at the 
Embassy. He also inclosed a news- 
paper clipping concerning the 1951 
Commencement exercises at the Uni- 
versity. 

With Corps I 

Lt. Col. Walter L. Miller, Jr., has 
been appointed chemical officer for I 
Corps in Korea. 

Colonel Miller is a graduate of the 
University of Maryland, A. & S., '39. He 
is a former member of the faculty of the 
College of Military Science. Included in 
his decorations are the Silver Star 
with cluster, the Bronze Star with clus- 
ter, the Purple Heart with cluster, the 
Combat Infantryman Badge, the Gli- 
der Badge, the Belgian fourragere and 
the Dutch lanyard. 

He arrived in Korea on December 5, 
1951. 

A former chief of the weapons and 
munitions division of the Army's chem- 
ical board, Colonel Miller has joined 
one of the veteran units of the Korean 
struggle. 

Colonel Miller first entered the 
Army in 1940 and served for two 
years at Fort Benning, Ga. Later he 
was a member of the 101st Airborne 
Division in Europe. In 1948 he re- 
turned to the U. S. to serve at the 
Army's Chemical Center, Edgewood, 
Md., where he received advanced spe- 
cialist training. 

In "Coronet" 

"Coronet" magazine recently fea- 
tured an article, "New Wonders from 
Sex Hormones" by Dr. Russell Marker, 
A. & S. '23. 

As a chemistry professor at Penn- 
sylvania State College, Dr. Marker had 
also become fascinated by those magic 
rings of molecules. Then he was hit 
by the same idea that had prodded 
Julian — sex hormones from plants. 

A class of plants called the saponi- 
gens contained the versatile sterols, 
but where were the plants? Marker 
pored over books, talked to botanists. 
Some kinds of saponigens, they told 
him, grew in the southwest desert, oth- 
ers in the jungles of Mexico. 

Using summer vacations, Marker 
turned explorer. One day, in Mexico, 
he watched natives toss an ugly trop- 
ical root into the river "to kill fish." 
The root, they said, was the cabeza de 
negra, which enabled them to catch 
fish easily. 

Marker took some roots back to 
Pennsylvania, and when he broke them 



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down chemically, he knew his search 
was ended. Here was the sterol-rich 
plant he wanted. Yet when he rushed 
to tell pharmaceutical companies of his 
discovery, he got a jolt. Sex hormones 
from the obscure plant? Ridiculous. 

However, the Maryland graduate 
was not stopped. Boldly he quit his 
job at Penn State and rented rooms 
in Mexico City, where he went to work 
to make the cabeza de negra yield its 
precious secret. He had only crude 
equipment and stubborn hope. Yet 
somehow from bales of the knobby 
jungle roots, he began to get chem- 
icals that resembled the hormones 
made by the human body. 

Finally he was ready. Wrapping 
two bottles in newspaper, he headed 
for the offices of a Mexican drug firm, 
Laboratorios Hormona. There he 
calmly set one jar on the desk of Dr. 
Federico Lehmann, the medical direc- 
tor. 

"Here are 1,000 grams of proges- 
terone," he said. 

Registered Surprise 

Dr. Lehmann stared in amazement. 
All the drug companies in the world 
didn't make much more progesterone 
than that in a year. Before he could 
even express astonishment, Dr. Marker 
unwrapped the other jar and an- 
nounced that it also contained 1,000 
grams. 

That was the start of Syntex, a com- 
pany organized to apply Marker's chem- 
ical magic to the cabeza de negra. A 
fabulous enterprise, turning out huge 
quantities of progesterone, testoster- 
one, and estrone, it quickly became one 
of the world's leading makers of hor- 
mones. Syntex scouts are now comb- 
ing the jungles of Mexico, putting 
whole villages to work gathering the 
i oots, which are needed by the ton. 
New Painting 

Dr. Leon Smith, Dean of the College 
of Arts and Sciences, has received a 
painting given to the University's 
growing permanent collection by the 
Standard Oil Company. 

"Wildcat Loonex Camp," a water 
color by Georges Schreiber, was pre- 
sented by Mr. J. McD. Price, Jr., Dis- 
trict Manager, Mr. C. E. Heim, Assis- 
tant District Manager, and Mr. Russell 
R. Rinehart, District Merchandising As- 
sistant of the Standard Oil Company. 
The painting is from the Standard Oil 
Company (New Jersey) Collection be- 
gun in 1944. At that time the com- 
pany commissioned prominent artists to 
paint scenes documenting the oil indus- 
try, to be used in the company's pub- 
lications and for exhibition in museums 
and university galleries. This collection 
is now being permanently dispersed 
among those universities with facilities 
for exhibiting. 

"Wildcat Loonex Camp," measuring 
32" x 40" was done in 1945 and rep- 
resents a newly erected oil digging 
camp in a desolate swamp area along 
the Mackenzie River in Canada. 
At Ohio State 

Two advanced degrees awarded to 
Maryland graduates have been an- 
nounced by Ohio State University. 

Alvin H. Howard (B.A. 50, A. & S. 




ON BROADWAY 

Tippy Stringer, (A. & S.) homecoming 
queen, journeyed to New York to appear oppo- 
site screen star Edmond O'Brien in the "Philip 
Morris Playhouse on Broadway" presentation of 
"711 Ocean Drive," on Sunday, January 20, 
over CBS. 

"711 Ocean Drive," based on a successful 
movie in which O'Brien appeared, has won the 
praise of national leaders for its expose of 
gambling syndicates and allied rackets. The 
story has been hailed as a gripping and graphic 
demonstration of the power of organized crime. 

For appearing on "The Philip Morris Play- 
house on Broadway" she received a cash prize, 
membership in the American Federation of 
Radio Artists and all travel expenses. 

Should she win the quarter of the competi- 
tion in which she appears, she will qualify for 
the race's grand finale Sunday, February 17, on 
the "Playhouse's" regular CBS radio network 
time at 8:30 P. M., EST. 

The grand finals, to be judged by ANTA 
President Helen Hayes, Equity President Clar- 
ence Derwent, and producer Vinton Freedley, 
will pay the winner $2,000 in cash and network 
appearance fees. 

Slated at this date to compete in the grand 
finals are Wellesley's Ruth Piette and Colum- 
bia's Steve Russell, winners of the first and 
second quarters. Leading in the third quarter 
is Indiana University's Julie Strong. 

The competition has paid off for several stu- 
dents. Miss Strong has been auditioned for the 
ANTA Broadway play series. NYU'S Natalie 
Craveth has been scheduled for a Warner Broth- 
ers screen test when she graduates in June. 
Yale's Forrest Compton was invited to appear 
on the Kraft TV Playhouse. 

psych.) was awarded Ohio State de- 
gree as Doctor of Philosophy. 

Joanne E. Jackson (B.A. '47, A. & S. 
Psych.) was awarded Ohio State de- 
gree as Master of Arts. 

At Mercersburg 

An exhibition of painting by Pro- 
fessor James P. Wharton, Head of the 
Art Department, University of Mary- 
land, was opened to the public in the 
Art Gallery of Mercersburg, Pennsyl- 
vania. 

Painting of the Month 

The fourth annual Painting of the 
Month Club Exhibition was held in 
January. The purpose of the Exhibit 
was twofold, i.e., to acquaint the public 
with the program of the Art Depart- 
ment as expressed in students' work 
of the Fall Semester and to select from 
the current work four paintings, each 
of which will be on exhibition for one 
month in the lobby of the University's 
Administration Building. The selection 
of the winners was by a jury com- 



[40] 



posed of members of the art faculty. 
The art students whose works are 
selected will automatically become 
members of the Painting of the Month 
Club, a highly prized honor. 
With "Time" 
Larry Hoover, A. & S. '39 (Political 
Science), is on the editorial staff of 
Time, the weekly news magazine. 
With Eighth Army 
Lt. Col. Wilmer V. Bell, with the 
8th Army in Korea, was recently as- 
signed to the supply section of the 
I Corps. 

Colonel Bell won his M.S. in physical 
chemistry from the University of 
Maryland in 1934. 

He is a former dean of the Balti- 
more Junior College and before his 
re-entry into the Army was in charge 
of the Baltimore City College Adult 
Education Center. 

A veteran of World War II, Colonel 
Bell holds the Bronze Star Medal with 
Oak Leaf Cluster, the Combat Infan- 
tryman Badge and the Purple Heart 
for wounds received in action. 
In Washington 
Professor Michael J. Pelczar, Jr., 
of the Bacteriology Department, spoke 
before the Food and Drug Section of 
the 2901st Research and Development 
Group (Organized Reserve Corps in 
the Department of Agriculture Build- 
ing, Washington. Dr. Pelczar's sub- 
ject was "Microbiological Aspects of 
Lignin Degradation." 

With Owens-Illinois 
Fred E. Ray has been named eastern 
scientific glassware sales representa- 
tive for the Kimble Glass division of 
Owens-Illinois Glass 
Company. 

A native of Wil- 
mington, Del., he 
was graduated from 
the University of 
Maryland's College 
of Arts & Sciences 
in 1951 with a bac- 
teriological degree. 
E. J. Rhein, divis- 
ion sales manager, 
announced the ap- 
pointment. Mr. Ray 
has been assigned to the New York 
branch sales office at 10 Rockefeller 
Plaza and will cover the Atlantic 
Coast States. 

At Atlanta 

First Lieutenant Perry Gray Bowen, 
Jr. has been assigned to duty at At- 
lanta, Ga. as Assistant to the Staff 
Judge Advocate, Judge Advocate Sec- 
tion, Third Army. 

Lt. Bowen entered the Army in Oc- 
tober, 1950 and was commissioned a 
first lieutenant in the Judge Advocate 
General Corps on Jan. 23, 1952. 

He received his A.B. degree from 
Maryland (A. & S.) in '48, and his 
LL.B. degree in '50. 

Diagnostic Reading 

The Committe on Diagnostic Read- 
ing Tests, Inc., of which Dr. Frances 
Triggs of the Department of Psychol- 
ogy and the University Counseling 
Center is chairman, met at the Uni- 
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EASTON, MD. 

Phone 1494-5 



J. RICHARD PHILLIPS, JR. 
& SONS, INC. 

Growers and Processors of 
Quality Food Products 

Phone: 38 
BoxH - Berlin, Md. 



G. D. BULL 

WHOLESALE 

Fruit and Produce 

Phone: 111 
POCOMOKE CITY, MARYLAND 



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SUBSCRIBE TO 

MARYLAND 

USE THE COUPON ON 
PAGE 64 



niittee are Dr. Robert M. Bear, Head 
of the Department of Psychology at 
Dartmouth College, Dr. Ralph Bedell. 
Head of the Department of Psychology 
at American University, Dr. John V. 
McQuitty, University Examiner of the 
University of Florida, Dr. George D. 
Spache, in charge of the Reading Lab- 
oratory of the University of Florida, 
Dr. Arthur Traxler, Director of the 
Educational Records Bureau, New 
York, and Dr. Fred Westover of the 
University of Alabama. The Univer- 
sity of Maryland is glad to have been 
host to the committee. 

Shakespeare Lecture 
Dr. Gordon Zeeveld, Associate Pro- 
fessor of English, lectured at the 
Enoch Pratt Free Library in Baltimore 
on "Shakespeare's Utopia." 



College of 

Physical Education, 
Recreation and 
Health 



Wounded In Korea 

JAMES F. MEYERS, JR. '50, a 
Lieutenant in the Marine Corps, 
is now with the 1st Marine Division 
and according to his mother would ap- 
preciate a word or two from Maryland 
friends and associates. He was 
wounded in Korea last September but 
has recovered and is in the line again. 
How about a line to Jim and our other 
Alumni in uniform? His address is: 
2nd Lt. James F. Meyers, Jr., 051719, 
USMCR, H and S Co., 3rd Bn., 7th 
Marines, 1st Marine Division, F. M. F., 
c/o Fleet Postoffice, San Francisco, 
Calif. 

Regional Conference 
Dr. Dorothy Deach of the Physical 
Education Department participated in 
the Regional Conference on Teacher 
Education and Professional Standards, 
held in Washington. 



Navy Extension 

Courses in the Spring Semester of 
the Extension Education Program at 
the U. S. Naval Academy are open to 
anyone meeting the admission require- 
ments for the University of Maryland. 

This is the fourth year of partici- 
pation by the Naval Academy in this 
progressive education extension pro- 
gram. Those completing the courses, 
which include American Foreign Rela- 
tions, Theoretical Physics and a Span- 
ish seminar, will receive full college 
credits. Physics include electromag- 
netism, hydromatics and optics, with 
calculus and undergraduate physics as 
prerequisites. 



CARL J. WILLIAMS & SONS 

CONTRACTOR AND BUILDER 

1006 West St. • Salisbury. Maryland • Phone 5444 



School of 

PHARMACY 

By Joseph Cohen '29 




He Has a Word For It 

DR. J. E. SCHMIDT has devoted 
more than 22 years amassing "A 
dictionary in reverse" consisting of 80,- 
000 cards. Only those with the widest 
vocabularies are familiar with as many 
as 40,000 words. Dr. Schmidt is on 
speaking terms with 150,000 words and 
if they are not ex- 
actly on the tip of 
his tongue, they are 
at his fingertips, in 
the file. 

Although Dr. 
Schmidt is now a 
practicing physician 
and we can only lay 
half-claim to him as 
a Maryland Alum- 
nus, we are never- 
theless proud of his 

Dr. Schmidt , , . 

tireless achievement. 

Bent on making a career for himself, 
he spent a short time in night school, 
then followed the Baltimore City Col- 
lege, the School of Pharmacy, and 
finally graduated with the Degree in 
Medicine from the School of Medicine. 
During his Medical School days, Dr. 
Schmidt worked as a pharmacist in 
Baltimore. 

Dr. Schmidt is a member of the Rho 
Chi Pharmaceutical Society, the Med- 
ical and Chirurgical Society of Mary- 
land, and the American Medical Asso- 
ciation. 

Aside from being interested in phar- 
macy and practicing medicine, he 
spends a great deal of time on his 
lexicographic studies. The latter has 
received wide publicity through news- 
papers, magazine, radio and television. 
Columnists and commentators have 
paid him tribute for his fine work in 
this field. 

The publicity brings Dr. Schmidt an 
endless flow of inquiries about words. 
Alumni Dance Huge Success 

On February 14th, Valentine Day, 
Alumni and their friends converged on 
the Emerson Hotel in Baltimore for 
the most successful dance ever held by 
them. 

The Pharmacy Alumni played host 
to Coach Jim Tatum and members of 
the football team. The film of the 
Maryland-Tennessee game was shown 
as the feature of the evening. 

Two hundred door prizes were dis- 
tributed to the guests attending. Re- 
freshments were served. 

The committee in charge was headed 
by Samuel I. Raichlen with Al Ogrinz, 
Gordon Monat, Louis Davidov, Victor 
Morgenroth, George Stiffman, Melvin 
Heer, George Hager, Frank Slama, 
Henry Golditch and John Crozier. 



[42] 




Our Keeper of the Exchequer 

To bring to alumni attention one 
who has contributed to the success of 
both the Pharmacy Alumni and the 
General Alumni Association, note the 
record of our Alumni Treasurer, Bertha 
Budacz. 

Bertha received her Bachelor of Arts 
degree from the School of Pharmacy, 
graduating in 1926. 

As often happens during school days, 
romance found its way into the life of 
Bertha Budacz nee 
Cermak, and in 1931 
she married her 
classmate sweet- 
heart, Frank Bu- 
dacz. They are also 
the proud parents 
of a daughter, 
Elaine, who is at- 
tending Skidmore 
College in New 
York. 

Her memberships 

Miss Bertha Budacz . , , ,, 

include the various 
Pharmaceutical Associations, Lambda 
Kappa Sigma Sorority, and the Quota 
Club. She is chairman of the commit- 
tee in charge of furnishing the recep- 
tion room of the forthcoming Kelly 
Memorial Building. This particular 
phase of the Kelly Memorial is a 
Pharmacy Alumni project. 

Until 1941, Bertha and her husband 
successfully conducted a retail phar- 
macy in Baltimore. Since then, Frank 
has been in the furniture and appli- 
ance business and Bertha has devoted 
her time to homemaking as well as or- 
ganizational activities. 

Although not now engaged in phar- 
macy, at no time has her ardor waned 
in behalf of Pharmacy and the Alumni 
Association. She was elected Treas- 
urer in 1938 and has held the office 
continuously ever since. Bertha un- 
derstands and administers the finances 
of the association in a most efficient 
manner. Her counsel is ever sought 
and respected. We are indeed, most 
fortunate to have this fine lady as a 
member of our profession and Alumni 
Association. 



Police School 

The third session of the Police "In- 
Service" School, supervised by Campus 
Police Chief Dan Wiseman, was pre- 
sented by the University in coopera- 
tion with the Maryland State Police. 
Speakers included: Major R. M. 
Ridgely, Maryland State Police; Hon. 
W. H. Sheridan, U. S. Federal Security 
Agency, "Handling of Juveniles"; Cap- 
tain G. E. Davidson, Division of Iden- 
tification and Investigation, Maryland 
State Police, "The Importance of 
Properly Keeping Records, Reports 
and Files"; State Senator Raymond 
Fletcher of Prince George's County, "A 
Senator's View of the Proposed Legis- 
lation Concerning Police Records"; 
Representative Perry O. Wilkinson, 
Member House of Delegates from 
Prince Georges County, "A Delegate's 
View of the Proposed Legislation Con- 
cerning Police Records." 



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Allen — Dubendorf 

DAISY FLORENCE ALLEN, to 
John Michelet Dubendorf. 
Miss Allen is a student at Maryland. 

Baker — Heimer 
Mildred Coale Baker, to Glenn M. 
Heimer. 

Both Miss Baker and her fiance are 
sophomores at Maryland. 
Bark — Sachs 
Barbara Bark, to Michael Sachs. 
Mr. Sachs graduated from Maryland 
School of Pharmacy. 

Bosse — Beach 
Janice Bosse, to Donald Beach. 
Mr. Beach attends Maryland; Sigma 
Nu. 

Dickerson — Mason 
Joanne Dickerson, to Ralph L. Ma- 



son, Jr. 

The prospective bride is a senior at 
Hood College. Mr. Mason attended the 
Mercersburg Academy and Maryland. 
Graham — Kranking 

Margaret Graham, to James David 
Kranking. 

Miss Graham is attending American 
University; Kappa Delta. Mr. Kran- 
king is doing graduate work at Mary- 
land. 

Gray — Cumings 

Jane Claggett Gray, to Richard 
Glenn Cumings. 

Miss Gray was graduated from 
Maryland, and Mr. Cumings graduated 
from Purdue University; Lambda Chi 
Alpha. 

Gregory — De Jarnette 

Nancy Lee Gregory, to Kenneth 
Rowland De Jarnette. 

The bride-elect is attending New 
York Institute of Applied Arts and 




Clifford M. Hicketts Andrea Elizabeth hiyalts Virginia Iaobel Ingalls 

WHICH TWIN HAS THE OTHER TWIN? 



Danegger Foto 
Martcl T. Ricketts 



Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Ingalls of Potomac, announced the engagement of their twin daughters, 
Audrey Elizabeth to Clifford M. Ricketts (at left above) and Virginia Isobel to Martel T. Ricketts 
(at right above). 

The prospective bridegrooms are twin sons of Mr. and Mrs. Clifford R. Ricketts, of Bethesda. 
Both are Maryland University seniors in the College of Business and Public Administration. 

The brides-elect attended Montgomery Junior College and George Washington University. 

The brothers met the Potomac (Md.) twins three years ago, and confess now that it was several 
months before they could tell the girls apart. The boys' mother said the twin dating arrangements 
saved wear and tear on the family car, since both boys could use it at same time. 

[44] 



Sciences. Her fiance attends Mary- 
land. 

Hackney — Embry 

Nell Thompson Hackney, to Wal- 
lace McKenzie Embry. 

The bride-elect attended North Caro- 
lina; Delta Delta. Her fiance attended 
Maryland. 

Hecht — Goodman 

Elizabeth Hecht, to Robert L. Good- 
man. 

The bride-elect attends Maryland; 
Alpha Epsilon Phi. Mr. Goodman is 
a graduate of Maryland; Tau Epsilon 
Phi. 

Higgins — Clagett 

Margaret Higgins, to Robert B. 
Clagett. 

The prospective bride is attending 
Maryland; Gamma Phi Beta. Mr. 
Clagett also attends Maryland; Phi 
Sigma Kappa. 

How ells— Stolle 

Patricia Irene Howells, to Midship- 
man Edward J. Stolle, Jr. 

Miss Howells attended Maryland. 
Hubbell — Morrin 

Priscilla C. Hubbell, to R. Bruce 
Morrin. 

Miss Hubbell attends Maryland. 
Midshipman Morrin is a first classman 
at the Naval Academy. 

Hulse — Grambow 

Barbara Hulse, to Herbert W. Gram- 
bow, Jr. 

Miss Hulse is a student at Maryland; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma sorority. Mr. 
Grambow also attends Maryland; Sig- 
ma Chi. 

Jones — Knapp 

Georgia Elizabeth Jones, to More- 
land Sinclair Knapp. 

Miss Jones attended Maryland. Mr. 
Knapp received a bachelor of science 
degree at Maryland. 

Logue — Ballenger 

Nancy Logue, to Richard Buffard 
Ballenger, Jr. 

Miss Logue is employed by the Navy 
Department, Bureau of Ships, and her 
fiance attends Maryland. 

Massing — Reynolds 

Patricia Ann Massing, to Joseph 
Cook Reynolds. 

The bride-elect, graduated from the 
Academy of the Holy Cross, is attend- 
ing Maryland; Sigma Kappa. Mr. 
Reynolds will be graduated in June 
from Catholic University. 

McAllister — Paris 

Jean Elizabeth McAllister, to Robert 
Ellis Paris. 

The bride-elect attended George 
Washington University; Delta Zeta. 
Mr. Paris attends Maryland; Phi Delta 
Theta. 

McNally — Bauerband 

Mae Elizabeth McNally, to Walter 
Sargent Bauerband. 

Her fiance is an alumnus of Mary- 
land. 

Mesirow — Mahler 

Ruth B. Mesirow, to Julian Mahler. 

Miss Mesirow is a graduate of Mary- 
land. Mr. Mahler attended Ohio State 
University. 

Mitchell — Chambers 

Joan Margaret Mitchell, to Ralph 
Logan Chambers, Jr. 



The bride-elect is a senior at Trinity 
College. Mr. Chambers attended Mary- 
land. 

M unson — Webb 

Marion Elizabeth Munson, to Wil- 
liam Herbert Webb, Jr. 

Mr. Webb is in the Air Force. He 
attended Maryland. 

Rein — Shulman 

Marlene Rein, to Joel Shulman. 

Mr. Shulman is a senior at Mary- 
land. 

Robinson — MacCallum 

Mary-Ellen Robinson, to Robert 
Melvin MacCallum. 

Miss Robinson graduated from 
Maryland; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 

Koch kind — Hirsch 
Clara Rochkind, of Baltimore, to Os- 
car A. Hirsch, Frederick. The groom- 
to-be is a Maryland School of Law 
alumnus. 

Rubenstein — Curtis 

Marilyn Rubenstein, to Elliot L. 
Curtis. 

Mr. Curtis is a graduate of Mary- 
land. 

Scott — Maddox 

Marlita Rae Scott, to William Lee 
Maddox, Jr. 

Both are students at Maryland, 
where Miss Scott is a member of Delta 
Delta Delta, and Mr. Maddox of Sigma 
Chi. 

Shade— Marshall 

Lindsay Pendleton Shade, to Charles 
Keith Marshall. 

The bride-to-be attended Maryland; 
Kappa Kappa Gamma. Mr. Marshall 
is a Maryland alumnus; Phi Delta 
Theta. He is on a Norfolk newspaper. 

Sheridan — Sinclair 

Elizabeth Ann Sheridan, to James 
Louis Sinclair. 

Miss Sheridan is a student at Mary- 
land; Delta Gamma. Mr. Sinclair, who 
served two years in the Navy Air 
Force, also is a Maryland student; 
president, Phi Kappa Tau. 

Silverman — Becker 

Wilma Silverman, to Lawrence 
Becker. 

Miss Silverman is majoring in jour- 
nalism at Maryland. 

Spaight — Moyle 

Vivian Hudson Spaight, to Edward 
A. Moyle. 

Mr. Moyle graduated from Mary- 
land. 

Swartout — Morris 

Susanne Swartout, to Frank H. Mor- 
ris. 

Miss Swartout and Mr. Morris are 
attending Maryland. 

Sway zee — Richter 

Anne Swayzee, to O. Frank Richter, 
Jr. 

Miss Swayzee is a junior at Mary- 
land; Kappa Kappa Gamma. Her 
fiance attends Cornell; president, 
Sigma Chi. 

Swearingen — Ballon 

Joan Swearingen, to Midshipman C. 
Davidson Ballou. 

Miss Swearingen is a senior at 
Maryland; Kappa Kappa Gamma. 



e are proud 
to have played 
a part in 
the building 
program of 
this University. 

EDWIN 

WILSON 

BOOTH 

Architect 
SALISBURY, MD. 



BUS SERVICE 

EASTERN SHORE 

* Deloware * Maryland 
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[45] 



Tabor — Shepherd 

Mae Louise Tabor, to Clayton Al- 
bright Shepherd. 

Her fiance is a graduate of Mary- 
land. 

Tiffey— Pobiak 

Anne Tiffey, to Albert D. Pobiak. 

Both are attending Maryland. 
Whirley — Culbertson 

Ruth Juanita Whirley, to Paul T. 
Culbertson, Jr. 

Mr. Culbertson will be graduated 
from Maryland. 

Waters — Bell 

Maude Estelle Waters, to Garrison 
Warfield Bell. 

Miss Waters is a graduate of Mary- 
land State Teachers College. Mr. Bell 
was graduated from Maryland; Sigma 
Phi Epsilon. 

Wheaton — Bailey 

Joan Fearnley Wheaton, to John 
Maury Bailey. 

Mr. Bailey attended Maryland. 

Zimmerman — Scharp 

Phyllis Jeanne Zimmerman, to 
Charles Besler Scharp III. 

The bride-elect attended the Mary- 
land School of Nursing. Mr. Scharp 
graduated from Johns Hopkins Uni- 
versity; Alpha Tau Omega. 





Baker — Brody 

BEVERLY Broody and David 
Baker. 
The bride is a graduate of Maryland. 

Bollo — Dunnahoo 
Marilee Dunnahoo and Jerome 
Michael Bollo. 

The bridegroom is a senior at Mary- 
land. 

Bouchal — Basil 
Anita Belle Basil and Joseph H. 
Bouchal, Jr. 

Lt. Bouchal attended Maryland. 

Branch — Swindell 
Opal Horton Swindell and William 
E. Branch, Jr. The bridegroom is a 
student at Maryland. 

Child — Robinson 
Jean Marie Robinson and Godfrey 
Byrd Child. 

The bride was graduated from 
Maryland. Mr. Child is now attending 
Maryland. 

Conner — Baughman 
Mary Suzanne Baughman and James 
Hagerman Conner. 

Both attended Maryland. 

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Member Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation 

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Dillon — Stone 

Bertha Elizabeth Stone and Lewis 
Albert Dillon. 

Both bride and bridegroom are to 
graduate from Maryland. 

Eichhorn — Walsh 
Barbara Ann Walsh and Paul J. 
Eichhorn. 

Her husband is a student in the 
School of Engineering at Maryland. 
Fulton — Haines 
Helene Pearl Haines, to David Rob- 
ert Fulton. 

They will make their home in Hy- 
attsville. Both are attending Mary- 
land. 

Gosnell — Dick 
Eleanor Dick and Wilfred C. Gosnell. 
Mrs. Gosnell attended Maryland 
Nursing School. 

Harrison — Batchelder 
Beverly Batchelder and Junius 
Henry Harrison. 

The bride is a graduate of the Uni- 
versity of Michigan. Her husband at- 
tended Maryland and George Wash- 
ington University. 

Heeter — Capece 
Barbara Ann Capece and Ned J. 
Heeter. 

Mrs. Heeter attended Maryland. 
Mr. Heeter is now attending Maryland. 
Hoffman — Mankin 
Lavina Mankin and Edwin G. Hoff- 
man. Mr. Mankin is a graduate of 
Maryland. 

Holbrook — Edrington 
Noel Carol Edrington and Dr. Wil- 
liam A. Holbrook, Jr. 

Both the bride and bridegroom are 
graduates of Maryland. 

Leeman — Wright 
Doris Jeanette Wright and William 
Leeman, Jr. 

Mr. Leeman is a student at Mary- 
land. 

O'Connor — Rorer 
Dana Eugenia Rorer and Edward 
Chapman O'Connor. 

Mr. O'Connor attended Maryland. 

Pressman — Woronoff 
Ritalee Woronoff and Stanley Press- 
man. 

The bride graduated from Maryland 
in February; Phi Sigma Sigma. The 
groom is also a February graduate of 
Maryland; Tau Epsilon Phi. 
Rose — Crooks 
Helen Frances Crooks and Warren 
Rose. 

The bride attended Maryland and 
will complete nurses' training in Uni- 
versity of Maryland Hospital. 
Schap — Dotson 
Gloria Lucille Dotson and Joseph 
Schap. 

They will reside in Bethesda while 
the bridegroom completes his senior 
year at Maryland. 

Schoen — Cushwa 
Joan Marie Cushwa and Stephen 
Frederic Schoen. 

The bride did graduate work at 
Maryland. The bridegroom was gradu- 
ated from the U. S. Naval Academy. 
Sieke — Spates 
Jane Lorraine Spates and Otto Fred- 
erick Sieke. 



[46] 



Mrs. Sieke attended Maryland. Mr. 
Sieke is also a Maryland alumnus. 
Stevens — Dickinson 

Mary Louise Dickinson and Richard 
Louis Stevens. 

Miss Dickinson attended Maryland 
and is to he graduated from its nurs- 
ing school in June. 

Watson — Lindeman 

Jean Catherine Lindeman, to David 
Richard Watson. 

Mrs. Watson attended George Wash- 
ington and graduated from Maryland; 
Alpha Omicron Pi. The groom at- 
tended Johns Hopkins and will be 
graduated in June from Maryland; 
Kappa Alpha. 

Williford— Trammell 

Barbara Jean Trammell and Ens. 
Beverly Randolph Williford. 

Ensign Williford attended Maryland 
and received his Navy wings at Corpus 
Christi, Tex. 

Wolcott— Riley 

Joan A. Riley and Pvt. Jesse P. Wol- 
cott, Jr. 

Mr. Wolcott attended Devitt Pre- 
paratory School and Maryland; Sigma 
Pi. 



WL SU S,t 



M 




Azores Baby 

TO Lt. and Mrs. Frank S. Bringle 
a son, Douglas Scott, on Novem- 
ber 21 at the Base Hospital, Larges 
Air Force Base, Azores. Mrs. Bringle 
was the former Jerry Covell and both 
are former students of the University. 
Another member of the family is Ger- 
ald Stephen, 20 months. 

Nicholos Hanks 

Mr. and Mrs. Justus Hanks are the 
parents of a baby boy, Nicholos Fenton 
Hanks, born on January 16. Mrs. 
Hanks is the former Eleanor Stahr 
Fenton. Mr. Hanks is an instructor 
in the History Department. 
Tiny Airman 

Capt. Robert M. Rivello '43, former 
faculty member and past member of 
the Engineering Alumni Board, writes 
from Fairborn, Ohio, where he is on 
active duty, to announce the arrival of 
Robert John, born January 6 at the 
Wright-Patterson Air Force Base Hos- 
pital. The mother is the former Mar- 
celle O'Shaughnessy, A. & S. '43. The 
weight — 8 pounds, 4 M; ounces. 
Little Luntz 

John Robert Luntz is a new baby at 
the home of John G. Luntz, (B. & P. A. 
'42) and Mrs. Luntz, 711 Walker Ave- 
nue, Baltimore. The proud parents 
hope he'll grow up to be a Maryland 
alumnus. 

New Sugarweight 

It's a new baby girl for Andy and 
Mrs. Quattrocchi, the former Mickey 
Fisher. Both Maryland grads. Says 
Father Q, former Terrapin boxer, "1 
may be slightly prejudiced, but I think 
we have a beautiful little girl." That 
decision is unanimous in the opinion 
of neutral judges. 

Future Cheer Leader 

Mary Linda Brasher, 5 pounds, 13 
ounces worth of brand new little girl, 



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on deck in the household of Jim and 
Mary Brasher, San Angelo, Texas. 
Both parents are Maryland grads, Jim 
a Terp football center. 




A R Y - 

LAND'S 
"M" Club banquet in Baltimore took 
place too late to receive full coverage 
in these pages. Bill Hottel is being 
asked to contribute an "M" Club fea- 
ture article for the next issue. In Balti- 
more at the first "M" Club banquet 
held off campus June '23, President Joe 
Deekman said the club is in favor of 
post season games as long as they are 
approved by a recognized conference 
or the NCAA. "We don't wish to take 
a backward step. We are for a vigor- 
ous sports program. Minor things can 
be cleared up if we don't get hysterical 
about them," he said. 

Sen. O'Conor, alumnus, was pre- 
sented with the "M" club first annual 
award for outstanding achievement in 
national affairs. 

"There's nothing wrong with ath- 
letics at Maryland except that we have 
the best football team in the country," 
said Senator Millard E. Tydings. "If 
we had lost six out of nine games you 
would have heard a thing about de-em- 
phasis. 

Tydings said the ideal student is one 
who is a great athlete and intellectual 
giant. That is the ideal at Maryland, 
adding "Too often the athlete is criti- 
cized for not being a good student when 
usually the nonathletic student is be- 
low average. I don't want to see ath- 
letics de-emphasized. Sports, like 
everything else, may not be perfect. 
Here and there adjustments may be 
necessary. Don't let them be too 
drastic." 

Special guests included President H. 
C. Byrd, toastmaster; Gov. McKeldin; 
Representative Lansdale G. Sasscer; 
Judge William Cole, Board of Regents; 
Jack Haggerty; Com. Ned Dougherty, 
U.S.N., and Bobby Williams, Notre 
Dame and the Chicago Bears grid star. 



in Japan 

Samuel Weiss of Riverdale, Md., was 
recently promoted to the rank of first 
lieutenant while serving in Japan. 

First Lieutenant Weiss is a bio- 
chemist at the 382nd General Hospital 
in Osaka. 

He attended the University of Mary- 
land Graduate School, '47-'50. 



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[47] 



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Salisbury, Md. 




Fire Service 

The report of the University of 
Maryland Fire Service Extension, for 
the year 1951, announced by Director 
Robert C. Byrus, showed an all time 
high of 90 classes conducted in various 
parts of the state and over 1,500 fire- 
men taking part. 

W. Thomas Owen of Annapolis 
joined the staff as Senior Instructor. 
He was Battalion Chief at the U. S. 
Naval Academy in Annapolis where he 
was in charge of instruction for the 
fire forces and also the enlisted per- 
sonnel. He has been a full time fire- 
man for thirteen years. 

A series of six schools for training 
instructors has been installed. Plans 
are also afoot for expanding the train- 
ing program to include actual fire- 
fighting as part of the program. This 
involves facilities to permit building 
fires for training purposes and con- 
trolling them under conditions of real- 
ity. The value of this type training 
was definitely shown during World 
War II when the Army and Navy con- 
ducted fire fighting schools that burned 
liberal amounts of fuel in practice 
fires. Several other States have in- 
cluded this type of training in their 
program with very good results. 

Plans are also under way for Special 
Schools of various sorts for Regional 
Schools. 

A series of conferences for officers 
of fire companies was scheduled for 
Thurmont, Frostburg, Reisterstown, 
Hughesville, College Park, Hyattstown, 
East New Market, Snow Hill, Center- 
ville and Havre de Grace. 



(Haps 



No Censorship 

The publication board restated a pol- 
icy of requiring student editors to sub- 
mit controversial matters to advisers 
before publication. 

Action on the question followed 
criticism of a student editorial concern- 
ing athletic policies at the University. 

Alfred A. Crowell, head of the jour- 
nalism faculty, said the "restatement" 
does not mean censorship will be im- 
posed. 

"We are simply asking that the edi- 
tors seek the advice of experienced, 
mature newspaper men before they pub- 
lish things of a controversial nature," 
he said. 



The COHN & BOCK Co. 

LUMBER • BUILDING MATERIAL 
poultry FEEDS livestock 

Princess Anne, Maryland 




BETCHA THAT'S NOT TRUE 

Kunigunde:- "Had you noticed that when girl 
students celebrate their birthdays they like to 
take a day off?" 

Ludwig: - "Yes, but when they (ret to be 
Alumnae, on each birthday, they'll take a year 
or two off." 



Samuel J. Macaluso 

SAMUEL J. MACALUSO, former 
trial magistrate of Annapolis 
and a World War II veteran, died at 
the Marine Hospital, Baltimore, after 
a lingering illness. 

He was a son of the late Antonio 
Peter Macaluso. He was graduated 
from Maryland's School of Law. He 
was a member of the Annapolis Yacht 
Club and the Elks Lodge. 

Survivors include his mother, Mrs. 
Josephine Macaluso, two sisters, Mrs. 
James L. Young and Mrs. Ellwood 
Brady and three brothers, Peter Maca- 
luso, Louis Macaluso and Joseph L. 
Macaluso, all of Annapolis. 

R. L. Johnson, M.D. 

Raymond Lovejoy Johnson, physi- 
cian and surgeon, 70, died at Way- 
cross, Ga. after a long illness. 

He lived in Savannah prior to com- 
ing to Waycross at the end of World 
War I. 

Dr. Johnson was born in Key West, 
Fla., son of Menendez and Mary 
Ophelia Lovejoy Johnson. 

Dr. Johnson studied at private 
schools and under tutors and received 
his degree from the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine in 1914. 

He was a member of the staff of 
Ware County Hospital. He served two 
terms as president of the Ware County 
Medical Society, and was a past presi- 
dent of the Eighth District Medical 
Society. 

He was a fellow of the American 
College of Surgeons. 

Dr. Johnson was a member of the 
American Legion. 

He was married in Atlanta in 1917 
to Martha Maxwell King. 

Dr. Johnson retired from practice 10 
years ago. 

Survivors include his wife, a son, 
Raymond Johnson, Jr., of Waycross; a 
brother, Clifton L. Johnson, San Diego, 
Calif.; two sisters, Mrs. R. H. Muir- 
head, Sanford, Fla., and Miss Bonnie S. 
Johnson, Ft. Myers, Fla. 

Charles D. Remsburg 

Charles D. Remsburg, 92, District of 
Columbia's oldest pharmacist, who was 
still filling prescriptions when he was 
87, died of euremic poisoning. 

Mr. Remsburg began work as a 
pharmacist in 1883 and retired per- 
manently five years ago after suffering 
a broken hip. He had served his pro- 
fession for 63 years. 

Born on a farm near Walkersville, 
Frederick County, Md., Mr. Remsburg 
attended Frederick College for two 
years. When he was 19 he took his 
first job in a drug store in Thurmont. 

He graduated from University of 
Maryland's School of Pharmacy during 
this period. His sheepskin carried the 
signature of Louis Dohme, one of the 
founders of Sharpe & Dohme, Inc., 
drug manufacturers. 



[48] 



He moved to Baltimore in 1881 to 
work for John F. Hancock, manufac- 
turer of Shepherd's mutton tallow and 
campho-menthol lozenges. In later 
years he was known as shipping clerk, 
prescription clerk, herb grinder, mut- 
ton tallow extractor and general helper. 

Mr. Remsburg came to Washington 
in 1883 to G. G. C. Simms, leading 
drugstore of that day. 

Mr. Remsburg joined with C. H. El- 
liott in 1886 and purchased a drug- 
store. He became acquainted with 
most of Washington's leading phy- 
sicians at this store. 

The partnership lasted 32 years. 

In his younger days, Mr. Remsburg 
was an active member of the Capital 
and Columbia Bicycle Club. At one 
time he and two companions made the 
trip to and from Natural Bridge, Va., 
by bicycle. 

Besides his son, who lives at 4905 
First Street N.W., he is survived by 
two daughters, Mrs. Rita C. Fault of 
Arlington, Va., and Miss Etta M. 
Remsburg of the home address, and a 
brother, Clint Remsburg of Carneys 
Point, N. J. 

Harry B. Hoshall 

"Who's that older fellow?" was a 
question asked from time to time over 
the years by student members of the 
University Band. They all grew to like 
"that older fellow" and many an alum- 
nus will be grieved to learn that the 
"older fellow" will not fall in with 
the band any more. 

Harry B. Hoshall, Associate Profes- 
sor of Mechanical Engineering at the 
University of Maryland, died recently 
in York, Pa., following a serious ill- 
ness. Hoshall, an instructor at the 
University from 1918 to the time he 
died, was in charge of all shop and 
drawing courses in the Glenn L. Mar- 
tin College of Engineering and Aero- 
nautical Sciences. 

He was best known around the cam- 
pus, however, for his active interest 
in the University Band. As counselor 
to the band, Harry Hoshall was a 
source of inspiration and guidance for 
many years. He is credited with 
establishing the practice of forming 
letters and designs on the football 
field. 

Born in Parkton, Md., Hoshall grad- 
uated from the University of Mary- 
land with a B.S. in Engineering in 
1908, the same year in which Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, the University's president, grad- 
uated. After graduation, Hoshall 
taught in high schools in Ellicott City 
and Sparrows Point until 191G. 

His funeral was held in New Free- 
dom, Pa., January 8. He is survived 
by a sister, Mrs. Lawrence Hoshall of 
Hampstead, Md. 

Mayor Roscoe C. Roe 

Representatives of the city, state 
and nation paid a final tribute to An- 
napolis' Mayor Roscoe Conkling Roe 
(U. of Md., Law '24), at funeral ser- 
vices from the Naval Academy Chapel. 

Full military honors were accorded 
as the Mayor was a retired lieutenant 
commander in the Hospital Corps of 



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SALISBURY, MD. 

Phone 4031 



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Dealers and 
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Telephone: Salisbury 4333 



WEBSTER 

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East New Market, Md. 



the Navy, with more than 38 years of 
active naval service. 

The Naval Academy band and two 
companies of blue jackets took part 

Governor Theodore R. McKeldin, 
represented the State and Vice Ad- 
miral Harry W. Hill, superintendent 
of the Naval Academy, the Navy and 
Federal government, among the hon- 
orary pallbearers. Other honorary 
pallbearers were: Senator Louis N. 
Phipps, (D-Anne Arundel); former 
Mayor William U. McCready, Mayor 
G. Lamar Kelly, of Rockville, repre- 
senting the Maryland Municipal 
League; William A. Strohm, retired 
Annapolis postmaster; John C. Hyde, 
Joseph M. Armstrong, president, Coun- 
ty Board of Election Supervisors; Boyd 
H. Farinholt; J. M. Shumate, D. Claude 
Handy, Charles F. Lee, St.; Carey L. 
Meredith, Dr. David S. Jenkins, county 
school superintendent; Judge Benja- 
min Michaelson, Capt. Morris D. Gil- 
more, U.S.N. (Ret.); City Counselor 
Louis M. Strauss, George Hansen, of 
Washington, Acting Mayor of Anna- 
polis Alderman Robert H. Campbell, 
Wilbur A. Jones, G. Luther Wester- 
man, James Hill and R. Hammond El- 
liott. 

The flags on city buildings flew at 
half-staff, as did flags on buildings 
and ships at the Academy. 

Mayor Roe had served as City Coun- 
selor and State's Attorney of Anne 
Arundel County when he ran on the 
Republican ticket for Mayor in 1949, 
being elected and taking office on July 
1, 1949. He had served slightly more 
than two and a half years of his four 
year term. 

He is survived by his widow, Mrs. 
Regina Roe, a daughter, Mrs. Char- 
lotte Harbold, of Annapolis; two sons, 
Comdr. Hiliary C. Roe, U.S.N. , on duty 
at the Naval Academy, and First Lieut. 
Roscoe C. Roe, Jr., U.S.A. of Camp 
Gordon, Ga., and seven grandchildren. 

The Annapolis post of the Veterans 
of Foreign Wars and the Annapolis 
branch of the Fleet Reserve Associa- 
tion held funeral services also. 

After serving as a school teacher 
for a period, he enlisted in the Navy 
in January, 1903. He was promoted 
through the various enlisted grades 
in the Hospital Corps of the Navy, and 
first retired on October 1, 1934, as a 
Chief Pharmacist, with the rank of 
Lieutenant. 

While he was on duty at the Anna- 
polis Naval Hospital he attended the 
Law School of the University of Mary- 
land and received his degree as Bachelor 
of Laws in 1924. He was admitted to 
the bar in 1925 and maintained law 
offices in Annapolis from that time. 

Mrs. Katherine Palm 

Mis. Katherine Irving Palm, 56, 
housemother, was found dead in her 
room, due to a heart attack. 

Mrs. Palm was a graduate student 
working for a master's degree in soci- 
ology in addition to her duties as 
housemother. 

A native of Pennsylvania, Mrs. Palm 
had, in earlier years, studied at the 
Lewis Institute in Chicago. 



Following the death of her husband. 
Henry Palm, early in World War II. 
she worked in California, and spent a 
year on Guam. Mrs. Palm was award- 
ed a bachelor of arts degree at Uni- 
versity of San Francisco last June. 

Her only child, a son, gave his life 
in Korea. She is survived by one 
grandchild and a sister, Mrs. S. E. 
Amour, of Long Beach, Cal. 

Norman H. Baker, D.D.S. 

Dr. Norman Hemstead Baker '09 
(B.M.C), of Charleston, W. Va., died 
recently after a brief illness. A native 
of Virginia, Dr. Baker began practice 
in St. Albans, W. Va., after his gradu- 
ation with honors from the Dental De- 
partment of the Baltimore Medical 
College. 

In 1912 he opened an office in 
Charleston and had completed thirty- 
nine years of practice in that city. 

He held several offices in the Kan- 
awha Valley Dental Society; he was a 
past president of the West Virginia 
State Dental Society; and he was a 
member of the Judicial Council of the 
American Dental Association. Widely 
recognized in his home state as a cap- 
able administrator and as an advocate 
of dentistry's participation in public 
health programs, Dr. Baker was the 
Director of the State Bureau of Den- 
tal Health and the dental member of 
the Advisory Committee to the Mater- 
nal and Child Health Division in the 
state's health program. 

He was responsible for the estab- 
lishment of the oral hygiene section of 
the West Virginia Health Department, 
which later was organized into the 
Bureau of Dental Health. He lec- 
tured in the schools of the state and 
before various types of organizations 
on his favorite subject, "Tooth Appreci- 
ation." 

In 1950 the dentists of West Vir- 
ginia selected Dr. Baker as the out- 
standing dentist of the state during 
the period of 1900-1950. He is survived 
by his widow, Mrs. Genevieve Camp- 
bell Baker; a daughter, Mrs. J. V. Bart- 
lett, of Washington, D. C, a graduate 
dental hygienist (University of Mich- 
igan) ; and a son, Dr. Nathan P. Bak^r, 
a member of the Class of 1945. 
Abraham S. Shpritz, D.D.S. 

Dr. Abraham S. Shpritz of the Class 
of 1907 (U of Md.), died in Baltimore 
on July 4. Dr. Shpritz is survived by 
his widow, Lillian Shpritz; three 
daughters: Mrs. Hilda Wolfe, Mrs. 
Eleanore Pollack, and Mrs. Geraldine 
Rosen; two sons: Dr. Manuel Shpritz, 
an optometrist, of Washington, and 
Dr. Silbert Shpritz, optometrist, of 
Baltimore. He is also survived by 
three brothers: Dr. Nathan Shpritz, a 
physician; Benjamin Shpritz; and Dr. 
Harry H. Shpritz, a member of the 
Class of 1923. 

Jean B. Walter Dion, D.D.S. 

Dr. Jean B. Walter Dion of the Class 
of 1913 (U of Md.), died on July 18 
at the Davis Park Veterans Hospital 
in Providence, R. I. As an undergradu- 
ate he was vice-president of his class 



[50] 



in the senior year and a member of 
Xi Psi Phi. Dr. Dion was a veteran 
of World War I. He was a member of 
the American Legion and the B.P.O.E. 
A native of New Bedford, Mass., he 
had practiced there during his entire 
professional career. Dr. Dion is sur- 
vived by his widow, Mrs. Yvonne De- 
sautels Dion, and two daughters, Mrs, 
Henrietta Hughes and Mrs. Lucille 
Clapton, of New Bedford. He is also 
survived by a brother Dr. George Dion. 
Robert I. Givens, D.D.S. 

Dr. Robert I. Givens '23 died at the 
Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore 
on July 11, 1951. Dr. Givens had prac- 
ticed in Pocomoke City, Md. for the 
past twenty years. He was a past 
president of the Eastern Shore Dental 
Society. Dr. Givens is survived by his 
widow, a son, Robert, Jr., and two sis- 
ters: Mrs. Hamp A. Hall, of New Cas- 
tle, Va.; and Mrs. Wilbur A. Jones of 
Bladensburg, Va. 

Oscar H. Heininger, D.D.S. 

Dr. Oscar H. Heininger '10 (B.C. 
D.S.), died at his home in Burlington, 
Vermont, on August 9. Dr. Heininger 
entered the B.C.D.S. following his 
graduation from the Burlington High 
School in 1907. As an undergraduate 
he held memberships in Xi Psi Phi 
and Theta Nu Epsilon. Dr. Heininger 
was a member of the Green Mountain 
Shrine Club, Burlington Lodge No. 1, 
Mount Sinai Temple, and Goethe 
Lodge.. He is survived by his wife, 
Lena Coombs Heininger; a daughter, 
Mrs. Robert Carr; two sons, Dr. Paul 
Heininger, who graduated from his 
father's old school in 1948, and Dr. 
William Heininger; and four brothers: 
Alfred; Bruno, of Burlington, who 
graduated from the B.C.D.S. in 1915; 
Edwin, of Barre, a member of the 
B.C.D.S. Class of 1913; and Arthur. 
Doris Etzel Mathias 

The School of Nursing reports the 
sudden death of Doris Etzel Mathias, 
class of 1942, on January 22, 1952. 
Charles L. Linhardt 

Charles L. Linhardt, Class of 1912 
in Engineering, who also received a 
degree in Mechanical Engineering in 
1929, died in Baltimore on November 
15, 1951. A frequent and extremely 
popular visitor to the campus at Col- 
lege Park, Mr. Linhardt was President 
and General Manager of the Automatic 
Lite Company of Baltimore. 

Mr. Linhardt, for years, presented 
"The Maryland Ring" to the man 
adjudged the best athlete of the year 



Messiah 

The annual performance of Handel's 
"Messiah" by the University's Com- 
bined Chorus was given in the Coli- 
seum, Professor Harlan Randall, Head 
of the Music Department, announced. 
The public was invited and admission 
was free. 

Soloists were Mary Lou Vernon, so- 
prano, Eloise Gertsch, contralto, Mar- 
lin Kinna, tenor, and John Mihok, bass. 

Dr. Westervelt Romaine was in 
charge and acted as organist-director. 




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Mr. Bealle 



FOOTBALL KINGS OF AMERICA 

A New Book on the Terps is Published by 
Morris A. Bealle 

THE University of Maryland's 
football teams, past and present, 
will be immortalized for posterity in a 
book entitled "Kings of American 
Football," scheduled to reach the book 
stalls this coming September. 

It will be produced and distributed 
by the Columbia Publishing Company 
and written by Mor- 
ris A. Bealle, nation- 
ally known and rec- 
ognized author of 
sports books. Some 
of his works, which 
have become stand- 
ard reference books 
are "Gangway for 
|f Navy," "The George- 
town Hoyas," "Foot- 
ball at Harvard" and 
the "Washington (Baseball) Senators." 
It will start with the beginning of 
football at College Park in 1892 when 
a green bunch of youngsters, used only 
to hit-or-miss sandlot football, went up 
against a heavier and more experi- 
enced Johns Hopkins eleven and came 
out a bad second. 

It will bring football at Maryland 
down the years, first, as Maryland 
Agricultural College, then as Mary- 
land State and now as the University 
of Maryland. It will explain the con- 
fusion to football historians caused by 
the University of Maryland's law 
school team, some of whose beatings 
were erroneously charged to the Mary- 
land Aggies of the dim and distant 
past. 

That '51 Team 

The climax, of course, will be the 
1951 crew which Mr. Bealle was call- 
ing the nation's No. 1 team even dur- 
ing the regular season when all of the 
so-called experts were picking Tennes- 
see. He printed on his Christmas 
cards that Maryland would win the 
Sugar Bowl by 14 points, so he doesn't 
belong in the "I Told-You-So League." 

Mr. Bealle says he is willing to go 
overboard on Jim Tatum's 1951 team 
— if "overboard" means "the greatest 
college team of all time." 

"I have seen the greatest of Percy 
Haughton's juggernauts at Harvard. 
His unbeaten 1910 team and his once- 
tied 1914 teams were his best. His 
teams were the best of that day and 
Haughton was the best coach," said 
Bealle. 

"I have seen the best that Rockne 
turned out at Notre Dame. I think the 
four horsemen (1924) and his unbeaten 
1930 teams were his best. These were 
all great teams," Mr. Bealle continued, 
"but none of them had the liquid of- 
fense, with four options to use after 
the defense had deployed into posi- 
tion, that Tatum's Terrific Terrapins 
showed at New Orleans. None of them 
showed an offense that equal manpow- 
er couldn't have stopped. We must re- 
member that Tatum showed his heels 
to one of the best defensive coaches 
who ever lived — General Neyland. 



Maryland has had some fine teams in 
the past. I think Curley Byrd per- 
formed miracles with the material he 
had to work with. But they're in the 
big leagues now," Mr. Bealle con- 
cluded, "and I daresay that, up in the 
Valhalla of Football Coaches, from 
their seat on the very highest pinnacle 
Percy Haughton and Knute Rockne 
are preparing to move over — sometime 
between now and A.D. 2000 — to make 
way for Jim Tatum." 

Mr. Bealle brings many splendid 
athletes to life in the pages of his 
book. 

One can almost hear the blocks and 
tackles as you read through its fasci- 
nating pages. Mr. Bealle, it will be 
recalled, was the first to give credit to 
Dr. Byrd for showing the football 
world the potentialities of the then- 
new-fangled forward pass as an offen- 
sive weapon. 

First Forward Pass 

Bealle denied the stories which gave 
this credit to Gus Dorais and Knute 
Rockne. He quoted metropolitan 
newspapers to show that it was Quar- 
terback Byrd who amazed and befud- 
dled the 30-point favorite Fordham 
Rams at the Polo Grounds, New York, 
in 1909. 

Some of the Free State football to- 
ters and blockers and tacklers he will 
recall, vividly to those who have seen 
them play and clearly to those who 
have not, will be Grenville Lewis, 
Harry Watts, Sam Cooke and Clifton 
Fuller of the Gay 90's; Curley Byrd, 
Burton Shipley, Untz Brewer, Bozie 
Berger, Shorty Chalmers, the Buscher 
boys, Hobby Derrick, Geary Eppley, 
Jack Faber, Al Heagy, the Knode bro- 
thers, Roy Mackall, Tom McQuade, 
Bill Guckeyson, Artie Wondrack, Julie 
Radice, Snitz Snyder, Country Morris, 
Coleman Headley, Jim Meade, Al 
Woods and George Poppleman. 

And of more recent vintage, Harry 
Bonk, Vic Turyn, Tommy Mont, Vein 
Siebert, Johnny Izdik, Lu Gambino, 
Jake Rowden, Elmer Wingate, Ray 
Krouse, Chet Gierula and the entire 
1951 squad, who are all All-Americans 
in Bealle's book. 



WARD REPLACES CRAWFORD 

Bob Ward, Maryland's first ('50 and 
'51) All-America guard, will join the 
Terp coaching staff as line coach, vice 
Denver Crawford, who is leaving Mary- 
land to take a head line coach job at 
Mississippi State, Head Coach Jim Ta- 
tum announced. 

Crawford came to Maryland after 
playing a year with the New York pro- 
fessional Yanks and assistant coaching 
at Washington and Lee. 

Coach Tatum said Crawford's as- 
sistance had been "a tremendous fac- 
tor" in the success of the Maryland 
team. 
**•*• + *••*•* * 

OLD ADVICE:— 

"A fellow can keep bust/ all his life 
just minding his own business." 



[52] 



Chacos Good Coach 

A backward glance to the Fall foot- 
ball season brings to light the name 
of Lou Chacos, who received his let- 
ter in football at Maryland in '41 and 
'42. He graduated in Education, 
1943. Never before in the history of 
the school had Roosevelt High in 
Washington, D. C. been a contender 
for the City Championship. The un- 
derdog Roughriders lost in the title 
game, but they gave their coach a 
real record in his first year at Roose- 
velt. 

Chacos took over the team at the 
start of the season and changed it from 
a chronic loser to a title contender. 
He switched from the single-wing for- 
mation to the T, and changed the posi- 
tions of several players. Roosevelt 
was tabbed as "an upstart," but under 
Lou Chacos the Roughriders have 
taken their place as an area football 
power which combines team work and 
team spirit instilled by a coach who 
played the game the way he teaches 
it. 




QRCHIDS 



MAY an avid reader go on rec- 
ord in the columns of MARY 
LAND with the opinion that our pub- 
lication is by far and away the finest 
alumni magazine I have ever seen," 
writes Robert M. Neiman, (B. & P. A. 
'39), from Van Nuys, Cal. 

In subscribing to "MARYLAND" 
Magazine, Mr. H. Ralph Pearson, 
Washington, D. C, said, "I regret that 
I cannot afford to send you what I feel 
the magazine is really worth." 

William P. Hicks '19, recently sub- 
scribed to the Alumni Publication and 
had these welcome words to say, "As 
Editor of a much less pretentious organ 
(Mountain Club of Maryland Quar- 
terly) I view 'MARYLAND' with a 
critical eye and am delighted with it. 
I am particularly pleased with the 
interesting accounts of the accomplish- 
ments of the various members of the 
University. I used to work with the 
Alumni Association when Mr. Mitchell 
was President and gave considerable 
time to its then very modest Publica- 
tion." Mr. Hicks' son, William P., II, 
was a '51 graduate and is now an offi- 
cer in the U. S. Navy. A second son, 
Thomas, is a University freshman. 



JEFFERSON:— 

"Were it necessary to give up either 
the Primaries or the University I 
would rather abandon the last, because 
it is safer to have a whole people re- 
spectable enlightened, than a few in a 
high state of science, and the many in 
ignorance. This last is the most dan- 
gerous state in which a nation can be. 
The nations and governments of 
Europe are so many proofs of it." 



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[53] 



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BROTHERS IN SPORT 

Bob and Ernie Fischer 




WRESTLING 

Krousekrushers Tackle the Big Boys 



Penn State 22; Maryland 8 

ARYLAND'S wrestlers, 
ambitious, willing and 
well coached by Sully 
Krouse, doing the best 
possible job with the 
talent at hand, once 
again stepped into the 
big league where 

wrestling is emphasized and lost to 

Penn State, 22-8. 

Ernie Fischer, 
unbeaten in inter- 
collegiate competi- 
tion, won his 
twenty - first match 
by pinning Penn 
State's Joe Lemyre 
in 1:46 minutes. 
Rod Norris decis- 
ioned Don Mormau- 
rey for Maryland's 
other win. 

Coach Krouse 

123-pound — Ben Homan (P. S.) pinned Bob 
Raver. Time: 4:04. 

137-pound — Dick Lemyre (P. S.) decisioned 
Dick Crowley. 

137-pound — Rod Norris (Md.i decisioned Don 
Mormaurey. 

147-pound — Don Frev (P. S.) decisioned Joel 
Adelberg. 

157-pound — Doue Frey (P. S.) pinned Bob 
Fisher. Time: 2:04. 

167-pound — Ernie Fisher (Md.) pinned Joe 
Lemyre. Time: 1:46. 

177-pound — Hud Sampson (P. S.) decisioned 
Jack Shanahan. 

Unlimited — Lynn Illingsworth (P. S.) decis- 
ioned Carl Everly. 

Navy 21; Maryland 9 

Navy's unbeaten wrestling team 
jumped into an early 8-0 lead, then 
held off a late Maryland rally to hand 
the Krouse-Krushers their first loss of 
the season, 21-9. 

Leading only 13-9 going into the 
177-pound match, Navy clinched its 
second straight victory when Peter 
Blair pinned Jack Shanahan in 8:01 
with a bar arm. 




Two of Maryland's three wins were 
scored by the Fischer brothers, Bob 
and Ernie. Bob, a 157-pounder, decis- 
ioned Robert Hamilton, 5-0, and Ernie 
stopped John Godek in the 167-pound 
class, 4-1. 

123 pounds — Robert Sutley (N) decisioned 
Richard Crowley, 4-3: 130 pounds — Herbert 
Crane (N) pinned Matt Flynn, reverse cradle. 
7:06: 137 pounds — Rodney Norris (M) decisioned 
Richard Gregory, 11-4; 147 pounds — Richard 
Wise (N) pinned Alex Papavalisiou, crotch and 
half Nelson, 4:32; 157 pounds — Robert Fischer 
(M) decisioned Robert Hamilton, 5-0; 167 
pounds — Ernie Fischer (M) decisioned Robert 
Hamilton, 5-0; 167 pounds — Ernie Fischer (M) 
decisioned John Godek. 4-1 ; 177 pounds — Peter 
Blair (N) pinned Jack Shanahan, bar arm and 
crotch, 8:01: heavyweight — Evan Parker (N) 
decisioned Carl Everley, 6-5. 

Maryland 14; West Virginia 12 

University of Maryland wrestlers 
defeated West Virginia University 
grapplers, 14-12, in a Southern Con- 
ference contest in the opening match 
for both schools. 

Bob and Ernie Fischer, brothers 
from Baltimore and both undefeated in 
intercollegiate competition, won hand- 
ily. 

123-Pound — Bob Perry, West Virginia, decis- 
ioned Bob Raver. 

130-Pound — Bill Pritchard, West Virginia, de- 
cisioned Matt Fynn. 

137-Pound — Rod Norris, Maryland, decisioned 
Kim Kemper. 

147-Pound — Ray Dodge, West Virginia, decis- 
ioned Pete Mahoney. 

157-Pound — Bob Fischer, Maryland, decisioned 
Bob Lower. 
Darwin Struble (4 m. 56 sec). 

167-Pound — Ernie Fischer, Maryland, pinned 

177-Pound — Jack Shanahan, Maryland, de- 
cisioned Phil Gomer. 

Heavyweight — Bob Boswell, West Virginia, de- 
cisioned Carl Everly. 

Maryland 30; Loyola 

Maryland defeated Loyola, 30-0, at 
Evergreen to gain their second win 
of the season. 

Coach Sully Krouse dug into his re- 
serves for the match with their Bal- 
timore neighbors. 

123-Pound — Francisco Alfaro, Maryland, won 
by default over Ford. 

130-Pound — Richard Crowley, Maryland, pin- 
ned Burke, 1 :56. 

137-Pound — John Little, Maryland, pinned 
Haupt, 5:59. 

147-Pound — Sidney Cohen, Maryland, decis- 
ioned Jacobson. 

157-Pound — Joel Edelberg, Maryland, decis- 
ioned Cyphers. 

167-Pound — Dick Norair, Maryland, decisioned 
Galland. 

177-Pound — Cliff Matthews, Maryland, decis- 
ioned Pfeifer. 

Heavyweight — Carl Everly, Maryland, decis- 
ioned Callahan. 



Maryland 25; Duke 5 

Maryland trounced Duke 25 to 5. 

Duke got its only points in the 177- 
pound event when Maryland's Jack 
Shanahan was accused of using an il- 
legal hold on Bob Malone and injuring 
him to the point that he couldn't con- 
tinue. 

Rod Norris and Ernie Fischer con- 
tinued unbeaten in four meets. 

123-Pound Class — Crowley, Maryland, pinned 
Raimondo in 1.27. 

130-Pound Class — Flynn. Maryland, decisioned 
Rowe, 8—8. 

137-Pound Class— Norris. Maryland, decisioned 
llurrell, 6—2. 

147-Pound Class — Adelberg. Maryland, de- 
cisioned Dieffenbach, 6 — 4. 

157-Pound Class— R. Fischer. Maryland, de- 
cisioned Accardo, 9 — 1. 

167-Pound Class — E. Ksicher, Maryland. 
pinned Gross in 1.82, 

177-Pound Class — Malone, Duke, won on for- 
feit over Shanahan. 

Heavyweight Class — Everley. Maryland, de- 
cisioned Campbell, 4 — 1. 



[54] 



As 


these pages go to press the 


Krousemen have yet to meet 


Feb. 


13 — Johns Hopkins 


Feb. 


22 — North Carolina 


Mar. 


1— V.M.I. 


Mar. 


7-8— So. Conf. Tourney (V.M.I.) 


*Mar. 


14-15— D.C.A.A.U. 



SOCCER 

Baer and Hamilton On 
All-Southern Conference Team 




ARYLAND'S outstand- 
ing University goalie, 
Eric Baer, was the only 
I**' ^M unanimous choice on 
the 1951 All-Southern 
Conference soccer 
team elected by the 
coaches. 

Coach Doyle Royal nosed out Duke 
for top honors. Hamilton also made 
the first team while Baden and Soder- 
berg placed on the second team. 

First Team 

Duys, Duke OL 

Strauch. Duke IL 

Almedia, N. C. State CF 

Foy, North Carolina IR 

HAMILTON, Maryland OR 

Sawyer. North Carolina LHB 

Kragas, N. C. State..- _ CHB 

James, Duke _ RHB 

Kalb. North Carolina LFB 

Kenken, Duke RFB 

BAER. Maryland G 

Second Team 

Riquezes, N. C. State _ ..... OL 

Dietrich, W. and L IL 

Russell, North Carolina . CF 

Lindstrom, Duke IR 

Gillespie, W. and Lee OR 

Ramirez, N. C. State LHB 

Stephens, North Carolina CHB 

Adams, N. C. State RHB 

BADEN, Maryland _ LFB 

SODERBERG, Maryland RFB 

Rumpp, W. and L. ... G 




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BOXING 

Debatable Decisions Mar Ring Openers 



South Carolina 4V 2 ; Maryland 3V 2 

ARYLAND'S BOXING 
team, a good outfit, 
ably coached by Frank 
Cronin, saw its home 
and away debuts 
marred by none too 
1 good officiating. The 
Terps drew with Cita- 
del and were nosed out by South Caro- 
lina's powerful team. 

At 175 Terp Bill Mclnnis, appar- 
ently leading on points, was fouled in 
round three by Jack Cassidy. Referee 
Vince Bradford, Lynchburg, ordered a 
rest and time out but did not penalize 
for the foul. The draw decision was a 
surprise package. 

At 139 Maryland's Bob Theofield 
scored two smashing knockdowns in 
round 1 against Gamecock Chuck 
Davis, taking about all there was of 
that canto. Round 2 was nip and tuck 
and, in the third, Davis scored one 
knockdown. It came up for Davis. 

At 125 Maryland's little Jackie Let- 
zer dropped a close 
one t o Gamecock , 
Allen George. It 
was a dingdong go 
all the way and 
there have been 
much worse draws. 
At 147 Terp 
Gary Fisher lost 
out to South Caro- 
lina's Emmett 
Gurney. This, too, 
was a close one. 
Fisher d i d some 
beautiful boxing Coacn cronin 




against the rugged Gurney. Some ring- 
siders thought Fisher won or at least 
merited an even ballot. 

Davey Shafer, at 132, bowed to the 
superior height, reach and ability of 
Gamecock Pinckney Watson. The South 
Carolina lad took all three rounds. 

At 156 Billy O'Brien, for Maryland, 
won a ripsnorting melee from Malcolm 
DeWitt. O'Brien landed the cleaner 
punches but is not yet up to form. 

At 165 classy Ronnie Rhodes turned 
in a classy job to decision Howard Col- 
lins. 

In the unlimited class Terp Cal 
Quenstedt showed vast improvement 
over last year's form when he won 
pulled up and going away from Chuck 
Spann, to whom Quenstedt lost last 
year. Cal was quite a boxer against 
Spann, aggressive and potent. 

Boxing is scored on a basis of 10 
points to the winner of a round, the 
loser from "1" to "9". Until referees 
begin to use some of the lower digits 
for the loser they will continue to dis- 
please audiences who rate officiating as 
the weakest part of college boxing. 

Maryland 4; Citadel 4 

At Charleston Citadel's boxing team 
managed to come up with a 4-4 draw 
against Maryland. 

Dave Schafer, Maryland, all on the 
Terp bench, plus others, figured Dave 
had won easily enough from Bill 
Gasque. It came up for Citadel. This 
at 132. 

At 147 Gary Fisher, Maryland State 
and South Atlantic AAU champ, a 
really good amateur, lost a decision to 
Mike Coppola. That too was quite a 
surprise. 

At 156 Maryland's Bill Mclnnis won 
from here to there against Danny 
Cronin. That one was chalked up for 



[56] 



Maryland. Melnnis, Kannapolis, N. C. 
lad, won the National Interscholastie 
155 pound title a few years ago and 
also the Carolinas' Golden Gloves at 
Charlotte as well as the Piedmont 
Tournament. 

At 165 Ronnie Rhodes, Abilene, 
Texas youngster, who won the Texas 
open, met Citadel's Bryant Johnson. 
Rhodes, who chose to come to Mary- 
land after looking over various schools, 
showed a whale of a lot of ability. 
But the man said, "Draw." Rhodes 
has class and ability enough to just 
leave that one to posterity. 

At 175 Jim Stewart, Maryland pre- 
law student and ex-Marine, lost to Bill 
Baldwin. Stewart will improve with 
a bit more experience. He did O.K. 
for a guy on his first cruise. 

Unlimited, Cal Quenstedt, boxing a 
smart, hard punching bout, also came 
up with a draw against Charles Har- 
vey. In the first Cal scored two knock- 
downs and the third round was his 
with room for a load of hay. So it 
was called 50-50 all around. 

At 125 Little Snorky Letzer, for 
Maryland, stopped Don Watson in the 
second round and at 139 Bob Theofield 
pulled down the shades for Bruce 
Mehrman before the first round was 
over. Decision for those two wins re- 
quired only a knowledge of elementary 
arithmetic. Letzer and Theofield had 
no ring experience before coming to 
Maryland. Referee was Jules Medwyn, 
of Furman, former University of North 
Carolina boxer. 

Future Action: — 

Feb. 16 — Miami 

Feb. 23— Army 

Feb. 29— Michigan State 

Mar. 15— L.S.U. 

Mar. 22— Open 

Mar. 29— So. Inv. Tourn., at L.S.U. 

Apr. 5 — NCAA Tour., at Wisconsin 



'Two home meets at College Park. 

Quattrocchi Loses 

Carlton Thompson, D. C. colored 
lightweight, scored a surprising and 
extremely close split decision victory 
over popular Andy Quattrocchi, former 
Maryland team captain in the D. C. 
Golden Gloves semi finals. 

A short punch to the jaw in the 
first round doubled Andy's legs and he 
fell to the canvas in the second while 
backing off Thomas' attack. 

Needing a third-round knockout, 
Quattrocchi landed hard and often but 
could not catch up with Thomas for a 
kayo punch. Andy was considerably 
off form. The crowd sensed that the 
better boxer lost. 

In his usual form "the Q" would 
have taken this one with ease. 

In the quarter-finals Andy tko'd Joe 
Boone, Southwest Police Boys Club, in 
the final stanza. Boone is also colored. 
Kostopoulos Wins 

In Baltimore Paul Kostopoulos, for- 
mer Terp welter, won in the State 
semi-finals from George Morrow, 
Navy. Paul had moved fast to make 
connections up town for his part as 
Joe in "Father of the Bride." An actor 
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BASKETBALL 

Team Work Featured by Millikanmen 





Coach Millikan 



ARYLAND'S basketball 
team, with 10 wins 
against 4 losses thus 
far is not doing badly, 
considering that Coach 
Bud Millikan does not 
field any of those real 
long guys considered 
essential on most teams. Team work 
is the forte of the Millikanmen who 
know that even a banana gets skinned 
when it leaves the bunch. 

Maryland 64; V.M.I. 46 
The Terps, out classing V.M.I, for a 
64-46 tally, got off 
to a fast start and 
were ahead, 24-9 
at the end of the 
first quarter. Jim 
Johnson and Gene 
Shue were the big 
point producers 
with 19 and 16 re- 
spectively. 

Maryland held a 
43-13 half time ad- 
vantage. 
V.M.I, came back 
strong in the second half, with Ralph 
and Kliner hitting for 10 and 9 points 
respectively. 

Coach Millikan used his reserves 
during most of the second. 

Maryland 59; Virginia 42 
Maryland opening the season at 
Charlottesville against Virginia, to win 
59-42, combined a possession game 
with a fast break. 

Coach Bud Millikan's lads played a 
typical Oklahoma Aggie game, press- 
ed the Cavaliers and forced them to 
shoot from far outside Terp defenses. 
When the Cavaliers became desper- 
ate, Maryland swept to the Virginia 
goal with ease by using their fast 
break. 

Dick Koffenberger, Lee Brawley and 
Jim Johnson were so good defensively 
that Virginia hit only six field goals 
in the first half. 

Brawley was Maryland's outstand- 
ing offensive threat, scoring 21 points. 

Maryland 71; W. & L. 51 

Maryland opened its 1951-52 home 
season with a 71-51 victory over Wash- 
ington and Lee. 

Gene Shue was the Terps' scoring ace 
with 17 points. 

It was an easy win for Bud Milli- 
kan's boys. 

Pennsylvania 53; Maryland 52 

Penn Quakers score on a foul shot 
with 2:15 to play to beat the Terps 
by one point, 53-52. at the Palestra, 
Philadelphia. 

Gene Shue was high man for the 
Millikan men with 16. 

The Quakers held a 17-9 margin at 
the quarter and were out in front, 
36-30, at intermission. 

The Terps got going in the third 
quarter and took command, 41-40. 



Penn quickly went ahead again, how- 
ever, and the "best Maryland could do 
the rest of the way was draw even. 
Maryland 54; W. & M. 53 

Maryland defeated William and 
Mary, 54-53, in the final 10 seconds of 
play in a contest that had screaming 
fans on their feet throughout most of 
the second half. 

At the start of the second half, 
Brawley, Maryland guard, made four 
points and the Terps went on to score 
15 points to the Indians' six. The third 
period score was 41-32, William and 
Mary. 

In the final, William and Mary scored 
a foul shot. Koffenberger, of the 
Terps, made a set shot to cut the In- 
dians' lead to eight points. 

With 45 seconds left in the game and 
the score 53-50, in favor of the Indians, 
Moran scored on a set shot to cut the 
Indians' margin to one. With 15 sec- 
onds left in the game, Brawley drib- 
bled in for a push-up and the one-point 
victory. 

A set shot by William and Mary hit 
the rim and rolled twice before drop- 
ping out of the goal as the game ended. 

Half time featured a roller skate 
dance exhibition by Miss Clay Keene 
Bernard and Rusty Miller, after which 
Alumni Frank Cronin, Benny and 
Hotsy Alperstein presented Miss Ber- 
nard with a golden gloves necklace in 
recognition of her services as mascot 
for the Terp boxing teams of '37, '38, 
'39 and '40. 

West Virginia 39; Maryland 36 

All-American Mark Workman scored 
30 points to pace West Virginia to a 
thrilling and close 39-36 victory over 
Maryland's hard-fighting Terps, whose 
possession-type basketball dominated 
the Mountaineers until the last minute. 

Except for a brief stretch at the 
game's outset, the Terps were in com- 
mand until, with 1 :24 of the game re- 
maining, Workman sank a goal that 
put West Virginia ahead, 37-36. 

Maryland got the ball three different 
times in the last hectic minute, but 
failed to register. 

The Terps held West Virginia's race- 
horse attack to exactly half its 78- 
point average in previous games. But 
with nobody within more than half a 
f( ot of Workman's 6-ft.-9 height, Mary- 
land could not stop marvelous Mark, 
who sank nine of his team's 12 field 
goals and 12 of its 15 fouls. 

Maryland 57; V.M.I. 39 

Maryland moved in front quickly 
and never was headed as it trimmed 
V.M.I. 57-39. V.M.I, tried to match 
Maryland's control style of play, but it 
could not match Maryland's accuracy. 
That told the story. The Terrapins 
were amazing in that respect, dunk- 
ing in 21 of the 43 shots they tried from 
the floor and missing only five of 20 
free tries. The Keydets scored only 
11 of 36 field goal tries and 17 of 36 
free ones. 

Brawley was the player who put the 
Terps ahead with a layup after about 
3 minutes of the first period and they 
stayed in front thereafter. Maryland's 
defenses were so tight that a field goal 



[58] 



by Skip Nay was V.M.I.'s only score 
from the floor in the first period. 

Maryland 51; W. & L. 43 

Maryland again defeated Washing- 
ton and Lee, 51-43. 

The Millikanmen went in front be- 
fore halftime and were never threat- 
ened thereafter. 

The Generals put on a strong finish 
but did not last long enough to close 
the gap. 

Brawley and Koffenberger furnished 
the offensive fireworks with 22 and 11 
points respectively. 

North Carolina 51; Maryland 47 

In a game featured by faulty offi- 
ciating Maryland took the short end 
of the score against North Carolina, 
51-47. 

The Tar Heels came from behind in 
the second half after trailing through- 
out the early stages. Maryland held a 
29-21 halftime lead. 

Until six minutes had elapsed in the 
third quarter, clever Maryland ball 
playing had maintained a lead that 
was interrupted only twice with 2-2 
and 4-4 deadlocks early in the game. 

The fourth period brought about 
protests regarding the arbiting. 

With two minutes to play, the play- 
ers themselves got into a free for all. 

Maryland was better than North 
Carolina from the floor with 20 good 
ones to 16. The Terps were outscored 
from the free line, 19-7. The Tar Heel 
players also got many more free 
chances than did the Terrapins as 30 
personal fouls were called against 
Maryland to 14 against North Caro- 
lina. 

That irked Coach Bud Millikan and, 
toward the end of the game, he pro- 
tested to Referees Curley White and 
Arnold Heft, both from Washington. 
For that he drew two personal fouls. 

Maryland 48; Navy 45 

The rocks and shoals which hazarded 
the good ship "Terrapin" at North 
Carolina were left astern when Skipper 
Millikan's crew steamed into the Sev- 
ern to take Navy, 48-45, the first 
Maryland win over Navy in 8 years. 
Arizona Lee Brawley's field goal with 
25 seconds to play did the trick. 

Brawley's one-hander, set up by 
Teammate Dick Koffenberger broke a 
45-45 deadlock. 

Don Moran added the last Maryland 
point after the regulation time had run 
out. 

The score was tied seven times in 
the see-saw last quarter after Navy 
overcame a 10-point deficit midway 
through the third period and threat- 
ened to pull the game out of the fire. 

Koffenberger's successful foul toss 
put Maryland ahead, 43-42, with 2:30 
left to play. 

The Terps froze the ball for one 
minute before a foul was called on 
Maryland's George Manis. But Navy 
missed the chance to tie the score. 

Soon after on an out-of-bounds play, 
Brawley, again fed by Koffenberger, 
shot the Terps in front, 45-42. 

Maryland 63; Virginia 53 

Maryland handed Virginia another 
loss, 63-53 . 



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Moke-Up Supplies 




[59] 




BISSERTS 

Bar and 
Restaurant 



Serving the 
finest in food and drinks 

PLAZA 9806 



Charles Street and Fort Avenue 
Baltimore, Md. 




PLaza 1910-11-12-13-14 

W. H. Kirkwood & Son 

Purveyors of Fine Foods 

HOTELS, RESTAURANTS, 
INSTITUTIONS, ETC. 

• 

Hanover and Dover Streets 

BALTIMORE, MD. 



Knipp & Co. Inc. 

MARINE INTERIORS 
MILLWORK-CABINET WORK 

600-648 PULASKI ST. 
Gllmor 7320 Baltimore, Md. 



Nurses Uniform Co. 

Made to Individual Measurements 

NURSES SCHOOL 

UNIFORMS UNIFORMS 

1822 E. Monument St. 



EAstern 4744 



BALTIMORE, MD. 



ALCAZAR 

CATHEDRAL and MADISON STS. 
Phone VErnon 8400 
BALTIMORE, MD. 



The Millikan men jumped to an 8-0 
lead in the opening minutes, and piled 
up a 27-10 lead with 10 minutes to go 
in the first half before Coach Millikan 
started to use his subs freely. 

One of the leaders in free throw per- 
centage, the Terps sank 21 charity 
tosses, missing only five. Four of them 
were missed by subs. 

Lee Brawley again paced the Terps 
in the scoring column with 16 points, 
eight of them coming from the free 
throw line. Jim Johnson, son of Ice- 
hockey star Ching Johnson, followed 
with 15. 

Maryland 55; Georgetown 40 

Maryland defeated Georgetown, Mil- 
likan's Terps manhandling the Hill- 
toppers with a deliberate decisiveness 
that asserted itself as early as the 
second quarter. 

The Terps were easily the better 
team, more so than the score showed, 
55-40. The Terps seldom wasted a shot, 
and Georgetown shot wildly and off-bal- 
ance. 

Co-Captain Lee Brawley and sofo- 
more Gene Shue were the big guns with 
15 and 14 points. Co-Captain Dick 
Koffenberger chipped in with 11. 

Grabbing rebounds for the Terps 
were Brawley, Don Moran and Jim 
Johnson, who took command under the 
rim. 

It was the third straight win over 
Georgetown for the Terps. With over 
five minutes remaining many of the 
crowd started heading for the exits, 
an unusual thing in a Georgetown- 
Maryland meeting. 

Rutgers 61 ; Maryland 55 

Rutgers upset Maryland, 61-55. 

High scorers were Jim Waring of 
the Scarlet and Jim Johnson of the 
Terps, both with 15 points. 

Rutgers staved off a determined last- 
period drive by Maryland by freezing 
the ball for the last minute and a 
quarter. 

The Rutgers score was the highest 
against Maryland this year. The Terps 
had allowed an average of only 46.2 
points per game before the Rutgers 
game. 

Maryland 71; North Carolina 51 

Maryland dished out a convincing 
trouncing to North Carolina, 71-51, be- 
fore 4,000 in the Coliseum, avenging 
an earlier 51-47 loss to the Tar Heels. 
The Terps equalled their highest point 
total of the season. 

Maryland held a 36-30 lead at half- 
time. The Terps opened up in the sec- 
ond half and outscored their rivals, 
35-21. 

Center Jim Moran and Ronnie 
Brooks, a sophomore from Anacostia, 
paced Maryland with 20 and 16 points. 

Much of the glory went to 6-foot-l 
Ralph Greco and 6-foot-4 Morrie Levin. 
George Shue's fine defensive work held 
Carolina's high scorer, Grimaldi, to 
only two field goals. 

The Millikanmen presented a steady 
team, confusing their foes with their 
criss-cross plays, and neat screens that 
blocked the Tar Heels out of their 
defenses. 

Maryland also took quite a few long 



shots. They were accurate. Maryland 
made 29 of 72 field goal attempts. 

Games to Come 

Feb. 14 Richmond 

Feb. 16 William and Mary 

Feb. 18 Duke 

Feb. 21 Georgetown 

Feb. 27 Richmond 

: Feb. 29 George Washington 

Mar. 1 Davidson 



''Home Games at College Park. 



TRACK 




Terps Take Millrose Two-Mile Relay 

ARYLAND'S unbeaten 
two-mile relay team 
raced to its third 
straight victory in the 
Millrose Games in 
New York City. 

The Terps, beating 
Columbia, Yale and 
Providence, in that order, turned in 
their fastest time of the season, 7:51.4. 

Coached by Jim Kehoe, Maryland's 
winning team was Bill Tucker, Gus 
Meier, Al Buehler and Tyson Creamer. 

Maryland, with Jim Pentzer running 
in Bill Tucker's lead-off position, had, 
a week earlier, won the two-mile relay 
in the Philadelphia Inquirer games in 
8:00.8. Prior to that the same quar- 
tet finished second behind Yale in The 
Evening Star games at Washington. 

Maryland won the two-mile club and 
college relay event in the 175th Regi- 
ment-South Atlantic Meet, Baltimore, 
turning back LaSalle, Baltimore Olym- 
pic and St. Joseph's. Terps Gold- 
stein, Horsley, Pentzer and Thornton 
did it in 8:03.3. 

Tyson Creamer defeated George- 
town's Joe LaPierre in the Blue-Gray 
600, in 1:55.7. Eugene Thomas was 
third. 

Bill Tucker finished third in the Col- 
legiate 600 behind Johnson of V.P.I. 
and Evans of Seton Hall. 

Merwin Tex Carter won the 60-yard 
high hurdles in 7.7, clipping one-tenth 
of a second off the track record set by 
Burgden, Navy in 1947. 

Jack Unterkofler took the shot put 
with 48 ft. 1% inches. 

John Tibletts won the two mile 
handicap run. 

Section B-l of the mile relay went 
to Maryland (Cross, Wilson, Smith and 
Workman) in 3:31.9. 



Feb. 23— I.C.A.A.A.A. Meet, New York 

City 
Mai-. 1 — Southern Conference Meet, 

Chapel Hill, N. C. 

************* 

MALAHINI RULES:— 

Football rules have invaded the 
Hawaiian Islands. Hapa haole hula gal 
penalized 5 yards. Backfield in motion. 



[60] 




MHUHNII "FIRSTS" 

1951 Gridmen First National Champions. Maryland 
First and Only Team to have Won in Two Sports in 

Sugar Bowl 



M 



"A R Y L A N D 

sports followers 
salute "Famous Firsts" 
in Terrapin athletic his- 
tory down through the years as listed 
below. 

FOOTBALL. Jim Tatum's 1951 foot- 
ball team was the first in Terrapin grid 
history to have won a national title and 
the first to have won in the New Or- 
leans Sugar Bowl. Both of these were 
achieved "firsts" as a result of the 1951 
Tatum Terps classic victory over Ten- 
nessee, 28 to 13. 

Jim Tatum's 1947 team was the first 
in Maryland football history to have re- 
ceived a Bowl invitation. They tied 
Georgia 20-20 in the 'Gator Bowl. 

Bob Ward, Maryland's star line-man, 
was the first Terrapin football player 
to be selected as All-American. Bob 
made it on all ballots twice, 1950 and 
1951. 

FIRST TWO-TIMERS. The Univer- 
sity of Maryland was the first and the 
only college to have won in two 
branches of sport in the New Orleans 
Sugar Bowl. 

The Terrapins trounced Tennessee in 
1952 for the national football title. 

In 1948 Terp boxers defeated Michi- 
gan State. 

Both were Sugar Bowl victories. 

TRACK. Maryland's 1940 relay 
team won the Penn Relays that year. 
It was the greatest track victory in 
Terp history, this national titular sur- 
prise accomplishment hitting the sports 
headlines from coast to coast. Tommy 
Fields, Gene Ochsenreiter, Jim Kehoe, 
Mason Chronister, Alan Mills and Bob 
Condon made up that team. A few 
months later they were all in uniform. 
Chronister, a Marine, never came back 
from Bataan. Colonel Geary Eppley 
coached this team. 

RIFLE. Arthur Cook was the first 
Maryland man to have annexed a 
world's Olympic championship when he 
did so in 1948. He followed that by 
also winning the National title. 

Margaret Mitchell, Sophomore, was 
the first Marylander to win a National 
rifle championship when she topped the 
Nation's women shooters in 1928. Mar- 
garet, by then Mrs. Caruthers, repeat- 
ed the acquisition of the national title 
in 1929. 

In 1930 the women's national rifle 
championship came to Maryland again 
when Alice Orton, a senior won it, and 
in 1932 Maryland did it again when 
Irene Knox won. 

Maryland girls won National team 
championships in 1926, 1931 and 1932. 
Earl Hendrick coached these teams. 



BOXING. The first Maryland team 
to have received a Bowl bid and to have 
returned victorious was the 1948 Box- 
ing Team which defeated Michigan 
State in the Sugar Bowl, 4V 2 to 3V 2 . 

The first and only Maryland man to 
have annexed a national boxing title 
was Benny Alperstein, who won the 
National lightweight honors in Sacra- 
mento in 1937. He repeated in 1938 by 
winning the National featherweight 
title at Charlottesville. 

The first Maryland boxing team to 
have won a Southern Conference cham- 
pionship was the team of 1937. Mary- 
land also won the Southern Conference 
title in 1939 and 1947. 

All of the above were coached by 
Heinie Miller. 

In 1942 the Terps, invited to the 
Eastern Intercollegiate Championsh'p 
Tourney, proved to be very truculent 
guests. They took the Eastern Title. 
Babby Goldstein coached the '40 squad. 

SOCCER. Maryland's soccer team 
annexed Southern Conference Cham- 
pionships in 1950 and 1951 under Coach 
Doyle Royal. 

SAILING. Willis Martin, Maryland, 
won the National Hampton Sailing 
race championship in 1948, the first 
such honor for Maryland. 

BASKETBALL. Coach Burton Ship- 
ley's basketball team of 1931 won the 
Southern Conference championship in 
Atlanta, wading through opposit : on of 
16 teams. It was Maryland's first and 
only conference basketball title. 

LACROSSE. Maryland's first na- 
tional championship in lacrosse came 
to the Jack Faber-Al Heagy coached 
team of 1936. Maryland repeated to 
take the title in 1937 and, in 1939 
fielded another great team to gain an- 
other national championship. To make 
it four titles, the Terps did it again 
in 1940. 

BASEBALL. Coach Burton Ship- 
ley's baseball team of 1936 "the Char- 
ley Keller" nine, won Maryland's first 
and only Southern Conference diamond 
title. 





On the job! 

Our volunteer speakers are 
saving thousands of lives to- 
day ... in factories and busi- 
ness offices ... at neighbor- 
hood and civic centers ... at 
social, fraternal and service 
group meetings all over this 
land ... by showing people 
what they can do to protect 
themselves and their families 
against death from cancer. 

To find out what you yourself 
can do about cancer, or if you 
want to arrange a special 
educational program, just 
telephone the American Can- 
cer Society office nearest you 
or address your letter to 
"Cancer" in care of your lo- 
cal Post Office. One of our 
volunteer or staff workers will 
be on the job to help you. 



American 
Cancer 
Society 



H. B. D. 



* 



Gray Concrete Pipe Co. 

Manufacturers of 

Concrete Pipe 

6315 EASTERN AVENUE 
Baltimore 24, Md 



He's always been a game little guy. 



Baltimore-Washington Express 
Company 

Daily Service Between 
Baltimore - Washington - Annapolis 

Lexington 1756 
1625 Ridgely Street Baltimore 30, Md. 



[61] 



WALTER C. DOE 
& COMPANY 



C^tectrical 
(contractors 



602 Massachusetts Ave., N. W. 

REpublic 1223 

WASHINGTON, D. C. 



William F. Nelson 

BRICK WORK 

3817— 14TH STREET, N.W. 
Washington, D. C. 

Telephone: TUckerman 2290 



ADVERTISERS 
Mat Service 

MATS: Any Size — Any Quantity 

24 Hour Service 
STEREOTYPES: Complete Blocking and 

Mortising Facilities 
MAILING: Addressing, Packaging 

1428 YOU STREET, N.W. 

WASHINGTON 9, D. C. 

Phone NOrth 1249 



A big nation is not one that is big enough to whip a small nation, but one that 

is big enough NOT to! 



MARYLAND alumni, members of 
the Marine Corps Reserve 
mobilized for Korea, were discussing 
the speed with which they were put 
through refresher courses. 

"Man, you should be in that map 
reading class," reflected one Terp sec- 
ond lieutenant. "By the time I plotted 
our location on the map, the instruc- 
tor was packed and secured for the 
day." 

"That's nothing," declared another 
who had been brushing up on artillery 
tactics. "We were reviewing math 
yesterday in class when I dropped a 
pencil. While I was bending over to 
pick it up, I missed out on two years 
of algebra and trigonometry." 



Two junior Terpettes were playing. 
One pretended she wanted to rent the 
other's playhouse. 

"Have you any parents?" the play- 
house-owner asked. 

"Yes, two," was the reply. 

"I'm so sorry," the small landlady 
said, "but I never rent to children 
with parents. They're so noisy and de- 
structive." 



She had made a real effort to bal- 
ance her checkbook. Her husband look- 
ed it over: "Milkman, $11.25; cleaners, 
$4.65, etc. Everything was clear ex- 
cept for one item reading ESP $24.56." 

"What does ESP mean?", he asked. 

"Error some place," she explained. 



"Why's your car painted blue on 
one side and red on the other?" 

"Terrific scheme. You should hear 
the witnesses contradict each other." 



"The battle of life" is a term ofttimes 
used. As soon as you let out your 
first squawk on this mortal sphere, 
your managers and handlers "weigh 
you in" and proudly announce youv 
bassinette-side weight. After that the 
bell rings and your're in for it and 
lucky to get a draw out of it. 



Two Englishmen on a grouse hunt. 

"I say, you almost hit my wife!", one 
complained. 

"Did I", replied the other. "I'm 
terribly sorry and all that sort of rot. 
Have a jolly old shot at mine over 
there." 



Two tiny Terpettes were leaving 
Sunday School. One turned to the 
other and asked, "How far did you 
get today?" 

"I'm studying original sin," the sec- 
ond replied. 

"Humph," said the first, "I'm past 
redemption!" 



"Young man," what do you mean by 
keeping Ann out until 4 A. M.?" 
"Got to go to work at 7, chum." 

A queer looking geezer walked away 
from the table, up the side of the wall, 
across the ceiling and down the oppo- 
site wall to the door and the street. 

An amazed customer asked a friend, 
"Did you just see what I just saw?" 

"Yes," was the reply, "he's always 
been an ill mannered chap. He never 
says 'good night'!" 



A faculty couple and their four- 
year-old son were invited to dinner at 
the home of College Park neighbors. 
On the way to their hosts the mother 
said to her little boy, "Montgomery, I 
want you to be a little gentleman. 
You know what being a little gentle- 
man means?" 

"Yes," replied Junior, "it means I 
won't have a good time." 



Kitty:- "What sort of bathing suit 
was she wearing?" 

Katty : - "I couldn't tell. She had her 
back turned." 



Jeanie: - "He had the audacitv to kiss 
me." 

Joanie: - "Of course you were indig- 
nant?" 

Jeanie: - "Every time!" 



Judge: - Why did you steal that $50,- 
000?" 

Miscreant:- "I was hungry." 



A small boy was seated on the curb 
with a pint of whiskey in his hand, 
reading Washington Confidential and 
smoking a big cigar. An old lady passed 
and asked: "Little boy, why aren't you 
in school?" 

The child replied: "Hell, lady, I ain't 
but four." 



1st Motorist:- "I love the beauties of 
the Maryland countryside." 

2nd Motorist: - "So do I. Sometimes 
I give 'em a lift." 



Boy: - "I'm a fraternity man and a 
gentleman." 

Girl: - "You mean you're one of 
twins?" 



If you eat duck without removing 
the feathers it gets you down in the 
inouth. 



At the Chinese laundry the wise guy 
thought the characters on his laundry 
ticket spelled his name. What they 
really meant was, "Cross-eyed man. 
Bowlegged. No teeth. Mean looking." 



[62] 



A divinity student named Tweedle 
Refused to accept his degree. 

He didn't object to the Tweedle. 
But he hated that "Tweedle D.I). 



She was only a bomber's daughter, 
but she knew her duds. 



Voice over phone to prominent society 
lady, "Is this the woman that washes? 
S. L. (indignantly) "Of course not." 
Voice, "Oh, you dirty thing." 



Dean: - "Well, it certainly took you 
long enough to find me. Didn't the 
Personnel Office tell you how to recog- 
nize me?" 

Freshman: - "Yes, but there were 
several men around here with large 
stomachs and red noses." 

Landlady:- "You've been here two 
years and you have never complained. 
Why are you leaving now?" 

Roomer:- "I just found out you ain't 
got no bathtub." 



Into the cistern little Willie 
Pushed his little sister Lily. 
Mother couldn't find her daughter, 
Now we sterilize the water. 



An old maid is a woman who has been 
good for nothing. 



Since an elephant is supposed never 
to forget, he must remember when you 
could buy a lot more peanuts for a 
nickel. 



Brevitv is the soul of a bathing suit. 



"Shake it up with the painting, paint 
fast, if you want to cover that wall 
before you run out of paint!" shouted 
the hard-hearted foreman who had been 
born an orphan. 

"Tut, tut," wisely counseled Oswald, 
the singing brush wielder, "Rome was 
not built in a day," nonchalantly reach- 
ing for a cigarette of which we'd give 
you the name here if any of 'em adver- 
tised in these pages. 

"But I did not superintend that job!" 
hissed the hard-hearted foreman through 
gnashed eyebrows, as he veered his 
course and dashed off into the fast 
gathering gloom along the starlit hori- 
zon and we see where our team plays 
G.W. again next season. . . . 



Not too long ago, when a student 
came home with low marks, his folks 
just bawled him out. These days you 
wind up in the Army. 



How about the fellow from Baltimore 
who, intending to give a pint of blood 
to the blood bank, lost his nerve and 
"confessed" to the attendant, "I'm a 
terrible rummy. My blood is about 95 r /r 
alcohol." "Good!", replied the young 
lady, "we'll use it to sterilize the in- 
struments." 



Speaking of mucilage pots how about 
the one who announced, "Some thinkle 
may peep I'm under the alfluence of 
inkohol. However, I'm not as think as 
they drunk I am." 



DESIGNED 
FOR THE 
VOLUME 
BUYER . . 




Our Master Painters' Store 

2328 CHAMPLAIN ST., WASHINGTON, D. C. 
COMPLETE LINE OF PAINTS, VARNISH, ENAMEL, LACQUERS 

O'Brien Barreled Dutch DeVilbiss 

Paints Sunlight Boy Sprayers 



FREE & EASY 
PARKING 



phone oonn 

HUDSON OOUU 



C.I.Sinith [o.liic. 



Retail Store — 2437 18th Street, N. W. 



The George Hyman 
Construction Co. 



ENGINEERS & 



CONTRACTORS 



010 VERMONT AVE., N.W. 
WASHINGTON, D. C. 



American Disinfectant Co. 

Pest Control Service 

928 EYE STREET, N. W. 
Washington 1, D. C. NAtional 6478 



SUNTILE 

A genuine Clay Tile 

Burnproof - Waterproof - Colorfast 

Call your SUNTILE Dealer at NO. 1725 

VICK TILE CO. 

2909 M St., N.W. Washington, D. C. 



NATIONAL EQUIPMENT Cr SUPPLY CO., Inc. 



Link Belt Company 
Power Transmission 9 

Supplies 
1244 NINTH STREET, N. W. 



"Pyrene" & 

"C-O-TWO" 

Fire Extinguishers 

WASHINGTON 



"MSA" Industrial 
9 Gas Masks, Canisters 
& First Aid Equipment 
1, D. C. HUdson 4430 



[63] 



GIANNERINI'S 
RESTAURANT 

Specializing in the finest 
ITALIAN & AMERICAN FOODS 

• Italian 
Spaghetti 

• Chicken 
Cacciatore 

• Home-made 
Ravioli 

6826 Harford 

Road 
Baltimore, Md. 




SAratoga 5835-36 

King Bros., Inc. 

208 N. Calvert Street 

PRINTING and OFFSETTING 
BALTIMORE 2, MARYLAND 



THE 

E. A. KAESTNER 

COMPANY 

DAIRY & CREAMERY 
APPARATUS 

6401 Pulaski Highway 
Baltimore, Md. 



UNITED CLAY & SUPPLY 
CORP. 

1122 North Charles Street 

Baltimore 1, Md. MUlberry 7200 

Building Materials - Brick & Tile 

Johns-Manville Products 

Carrier Refrigeration and 

Air Conditioning 

Tracy Cabinets - P/C Glass Blocks 

ESTATE - RANGES 



MARYLAND BRASS & 
METAL WORKS 



Non-Ferrous Castings 
Since 1866 



Essex 287 



Baltimore, Md. 



DENTISTRY 

I Concluded from payr 18) 

Barney E. Olitsky '25 

After his graduation in the Class 01 
1925, Dr. Olitsky returned to his home 
town of Trenton, N. J., where he has 
been practicing for over twenty-six 
years. An enthusiastic participant in 
professional, civic and social affairs, 
he has demonstrated an unusual pre- 
dilection for contributing through the 
media of his memberships in various 
types of organizations. 

He served as the secretary of the 
Mercer County Dental Society in 1943, 
and as its president in 1944. He was 
chairman of the Committee on Mem- 
bership of the New Jersey State Den- 
tal Society in 1945 and a member of 
the Society's Mid-Winter Dental Clinic 
Committee, 1946-1948. He has pub- 
lished several articles on the dental 
care of children and is the editor of 
the "Sports and Hobbies" section of 



Murphy General Hospital in Waltham, 
Mass. While at Murphy he was for- 
tunate in being able to work with sev- 
eral of the leading oral surgeons of 
the area. 

After separation from the service he 
accepted an invitation to join the fac- 
ulty of the Medical College of Virginia 
as Associate in Oral Diagnosis, where 
he taught during one academic year. 
In 1949 Dr. Moses opened an office for 
the general practice of dentistry in 
Hamilton, Mass., a delightful small 
town near the coast. 

Desiring to continue a well-grounded 
interest in teaching, he chose to sup- 
plement his efforts as a practitioner by 
part-time teaching at the Tufts Dental 
School as Instructor in Clinical Den- 
tistry, affiliated with the Department 
of Oral Diagnosis. The Moses family, 
which includes a daughter going on 
three, regard both their location and 
their occupation as ideally suited to 
their vocations and their avocations. 




the Bulletin of the Mercer County 
Society. 

Dr. Olitsky is a Past Master of the 
True Craftsman Lodge, F. & A. M., 
and a member of the Valley of New- 
ark Consistory, the Crescent Temple 
of the Ancient Arabic Order, Nobles 
of the Mystic Shrine, the Tall Cedars 
of Lebanon No. 4 of Trenton, the 
B.P.O.E., the High Twelve Luncheon 
Club and the Crescent Shrine Lunch- 
eon Club. He is a Past President of 
the Trenton chapters of B'nai Brith 
and Z. 0. A. He also is a member of 
the Mayor's Citizen Committee. Bar- 
ney is married to the former Lillian 
Gandel, of Baltimore; they have a son, 
Stephen. 

Harold I). Moses '46 

In the five years since his gradua- 
tion Dr. Moses has had an unusually 
interesting and profitable series of ex- 
periences. Following an internship at 
the University Hospital, he was com- 
missioned as a first lieutenant in the 
D. C. (AUS). During the two years 
of his association with the Army Den- 
tal Corps, he was stationed at the 



Charles S. Brown '26 

Since the day many years ago when 
he came up from Lick Creek, W. Va., 
to the University of Maryland to seek 
training in his chosen profession, 
Charley Brown has been moving along 
in a very sure manner towards achiev- 
ing many aims that only a sincere, 
capable, and versatile practitioner 
could hope to achieve. Following his 
graduation in the Class of 1926, Dr. 
Brown practiced in Statesbury, W. Va., 
for a year. 

He then moved to War, where he 
still resides after a quarter of a cen- 
tury of unusually interesting and var- 
ied experience. For eight years he 
served the town of War as its mayor. 
Always interested in civic affairs, he 
is the President of the Big Creek Dis- 
trict Boosters Club. A Past President 
of Kiwanis, he also holds memberships 
in the Shriners, Elks and Moose. 

Dr. Brown reached the high point of 
his professional career when he was 
appointed Director of the McDowell 
County Dental Clinic, founded by the 
voters of the county in 1919. 



[64] 



f you are building a house 




11 ^ 

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i*ft the facts about 



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numbers of users have told us that even with all its 
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The Gas & Electric Co., Baltimore. 



For a Free Estimate Call Your Gas Heating Contractor 



FAIRHAVEN 
FARMS DAIRY 

Sykesville, Md. 

Serving 

UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL 
OF BALTIMORE 



PLaza 4821 

BLUMENTHAL-KAHN 
ELECTRIC CO., INC. ] 

Electrical Construction 
Lighting Fixtures 

43 S. LIBERTY STREET 

BALTIMORE 1, MD 



Terra^ k0lne 

For years and years, Maryland alumni 
have come to the largest hotel in Baltimore 

for out-of-this-world meals, delight- 
fully comfortable rooms and superb 
service. And recently, they've found another 

good reason for making the Lord 
Baltimore their headquarters . . . it's 
the wonderfully different 







LORD BAITIMOM 
HOTEL 




T. HOWARD DUCKETT 
Chairman of the Board and Executive Committee 



A Strong, Friendly Bank 

Offering Every Banking 

and Trust Service 



The merger of Prince Georges Bank and Trust Company with the Suburban 
National Bank of Silver Spring to form the SUBURBAN TRUST COMPANY, 
means increased strength — resources of over 65-Million Dollars. It means 
greater convenience — eleven strategically located offices. It means broader 
lending capacity — for personal or business needs. It means faster service 
because of increased operating efficiency, modern equipment, streamlined 
methods. Locally owned and locally staffed — it means neighborly interest 
in your needs and financial questions. 



Suburban Trust 
Company 

HYATTSVILLE, Md. SILVER SPRING, Md. 



5214 Baltimore Ave. 
UNion 7500 



8252 Georgia Ave. 
SLigo 1000 



BETHESDA, Md. 
4600 East-West Highway 

COLLEGE PARK, Md. 

736Q Baltimore Ave. 

8722 FLOWER AVE. 
(And Piney Branch Rd.) 



GREENBELT, Md. 
25 Crescent Rd. 

MT. RAINIER, Md. 
3716 Rhode Island Ave. 

WHITE OAK. Md. 
Naval Ordnance Laboratory 



TAKOMA PARK, Md. 
Carroll & Willow Aves. 

W. HYATTSVILLE, Md. 
5416 Queens Chapel Rd. 

WHEATON, Md. 
11427 Georgia Ave. 



MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION 



"ssas?- 





"^ometooob Colonial pricks" 

Made by Hand by 

BALTIMORE BRICK COMPANY 

BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 



were selected to face the exterior of this graceful Georgian 
Chapel at the University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 



Henry Powell Hopkins, Architect 
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SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND • IN METROPOLITAN WASHINGTON, D. C. 



Vol. XXIII 



May-June 1952 



M 



ARYLAND 

PUBLICATION OF THE 
UNIVERSITY •' MARYLAND 
ALUMNI 



Published Bi-Monthly at the University of 
Maryland, and entered at the Post Office, Col- 
lege Park, Md., as second class mail matter 
under the Act of Congress of March 3, 1879. 
$3.00 per year. Fifty cents the copy. 



HARVEY L. MILLER, Managing Editor 

Director of Publications and Publicity 

University of Marvland 

College Park, Md. 



MAXINE DAYTON BARKER 

Circulation Manager 

University of Maryland 

College Park, Md. 



UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 
Officers 

Talbot T. Speer '17, President Miss Sarah E. Morris '24, Vice-President 

Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12, Vice President David L. Brigham '38. Executive Secretary 

Alumni Council 

AGRICULTURE— Abram Z. Gottwals '38, J. Homer Remsberg '18, Dr. Howard L. Stier '32, Lee W. 

Adkins '42 (alternate). 
ARTS & SCIENCES— Frederick S. DeMarr '49, Loy M. Shipp, Jr. '43, William H. Press '28. 
BUSINESS & PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION— Egbert F. Tingley '27, Talbot T. Speer '17, N. S. 

Sinclair '43. 
EDUCATION — Mrs. Florence Duke '50, Miss Joan Mattingly '51, Donald Maley '50. 
ENGINEERING— Col. O. H. Saunders '10, S. Chester Ward '32, C. V. Koons '29. 
HOME ECONOMICS— Mrs. Mary R. Langford '26, Miss Ruth McRae '27, Mrs. Hilda Jones Nystrom 

DENTAL— Thomas J. Bland, Jr. '17, Arthur I. Bell '19, C. Clifton Coward '23. 
MEDICAL— Thurston R. Adams '34, John A. Wagner '38, William H. Triplett 11. 
LAW— John G. Turnbull '32. John G. Prendergast '33. G. Kenneth Reiblich '29. 
NURSING— Flora Street '38, Mrs. Eva Farley '27, June E. Geiser '47. 
PHARMACY— Francis P. Balassone '25, Morris Cooper '26, Joseph Cohen '29. 



Clubs 



SALLY LADIN OGDEN, Advertising Director 

3333 N. Charles Street 

Baltimore 18, Md. 



BALTIMORE CLUB — Dr. Albert E. Goldstein '12. 
NEW YORK CLUB— Miss Sarah E. Morris '24. 
CUMBERLAND CLUB— Dr. J. Russell Cook '23. 
PITTSBURGH CLUB— Herbert O. Eby '32 



"M" CLUB— Joseph H. Derkman '31. 

EX-OFFICIO— Dr. H. C. Byrd '08. President. 
University of Maryland; David L. Brigham, 
'38, Exec Sect'y., Alumni Association- 



[1] 



"M" an GAME, MAI 2nd 

Dr. Ford F. Loker Elected President 

Varsity vs. Alumni in Spring Football Clash 

"M" Club to Cooperate in Homecoming Dance 

Baltimore Banquet, Attended by Distinguished Old Liners, 

is Great Success 
Committee Heads Named 



By Bill Hotiel 




ARYLAND's an- 
nual Varsity- 
Alumni football 
game, pitting re- 
turning grads and 
seniors who are 
still on the cam- 
pus, against the 
1952 varsity squad will be held in old 
Byrd Stadium on the evening of May 2. 
The game will start at 7:15 as the 
Military Ball is to be held that night. 
Pans for the contest were made at 
a meeting of the Board of Governors 
of the "M" Club on March 13 at which 
time a committee was named to pro- 
mote and handle the affair. Last year's 
Varsity-Aumni game was a great suc- 
cess. 

Deckman Chairman 

Joe Deckman, immediate past presi- 
dent, was chosen chairman for the 
game. Ralph Shure, the chairman of 
the 1951 contest, will be Deckman's 
chief aide. More than 4,500 enjoyed the 
first tilt last spring. A much larger 
crowd is expected on May 2. 

Associated with Deckman and Shure 
in promoting the affair will be Jim 
Tatum, head football coach and athletic 
director; William W. (Bill) Cobey, 
graduate manager of athletics; Joe 
Blair, sports publicity director; Tom 
Webb, Hotsy Alperstein, Dave Brig- 
ham, Jack Faber, "M" Club treasurer; 
Pete Augsburger, Bill Larash and Don 
Soderberg of the Campus "M" Club; 
Charley Miller of Baltimore; Earl 
Thomson, Jr., of Annapolis, Chester 
Ward and Bill Hottel. 

Old Stars to Return 
If you haven't obtained tickets in ad- 
vance just make your appearance the 
night of the game. 

Deckman announced that the pro- 
cedure of last year would be followed 
in inviting recent gridiron stars from 
distant points to return for this game. 
This added spice and attractiveness to 
the 1951 contest and provided an op- 
portunity for a reunion between stars 
of recent years and their former team- 
mates. 

The "M" Club will play a prominent 
part in another big event, the Home- 
coming Dance. Plans for this were 
made by the appointment of a commit- 
tee to cooperate with the undergradu- 
ate group. The dance will be held in 
'■on junction with the Louisiana State 
football game on October 25. Last 



year's Homecoming Dance drew a ca- 
pacity crowd in the armory. 

Bob James was named chairman of 
this committee, along with Al Woods 
and Frank Cronin and two members of 
the Campus "M" Club, one of whom 
will be Bill Larash. The other, the 
president of the group, has not yet 
been elected. 

Banquet Is Great Success 

While the "M" Club members look 
forward to the two big events described 
above, they also look back with great 
satisfaction to the 29th annual meet- 
ing and banquet held at the Belvedere 
in Baltimore on February 9. 

At the meeting, in addition to the 
election of officers and the transaction 
of other business, the following posi- 
tive resolution in support of athletics 
was passed: 

Be it resolved that the "M" Club go 
on record as favoring post-season 
games which are sponsored or approved 
by the NCAA or an established confer- 
ence and that a vigorous program of 
both intercollegiate and intramural 
sports be continued. 

The "M" Club banquet was attended 
by more than 300 and the Board of 
Governors, at its March 13 meeting, 
voted to make it an annual affair in 
Baltimore. It was by far the most suc- 
cessful event ever staged by the or- 
ganization. 

Snappily Conducted 

Snappily handled by President Joe 
Deckman and with Curley Byrd as 
toastmaster, the affair was alluring in 
all its phases. It was almost unique 
in that respect. 

Former Senator Millard Tydings, 
graduate of both College Park and the 
School of Law, as well as wearer of the 
"M," was the principal speaker. He 
limited himself to 10 minutes, athough 
his audience would have gladly listened 
longer. 



TICKETS FOR GAME 
Tickets for the Varsity-Alumni 
grid game the night of May 2 
are being handled by William W. 
(Bill) Cobey, graduate manager 
of athletics, Box 295, College 
Park. All tickets are $1.25, tax 
included, but those buying them 
early will get reserved seats. 




"Chief" opined that a balanced stu- 
dent is one who can combine studies 
and athletics and that he is strongly 
against de-emphasizing athletics. 
'Sports are great for the Nation," Tyd- 
ings said, "and the only thing wrong 
with them at the University of Mary- 
land, the greatest school in the world, 
was the fact that it produced the best 
football team in the United States. If 
the team had lost six of nine games 
nothing would have been said about 
the athletic set-up." 

Senator O'Conor Honored 
Senator Herbert R. O'Conor, a grad- 
uate of the School of Law, was pre- 
sented the first annual "M" Club citi- 
zenship award and an honorary mem- 
bership. He was selected for "his 
achievements in national affairs and 
contributions to the American way of 
life.' 

Deckman, in making the presenta- 
tion, commented "the Senator and I 
appear to be among the few surviving 
Jeffersonian democrats." 

In his reply Senator O'Conor de- 
clared, "Instead of sitting at the head 
table in the future, I will be glad to be 
counted in the ranks of the "M" Club 
members." 

Gov. Theodore 
McKeldin and Rep. 
Lansdale Sasscer, 
who were present, 
and Mayor Thomas 
D'Alesandro of Bal- 
timore, who was in 
Florida at the time, 
also were given hon- 
orary "M" Club 
memberships. Sas- 
scer, complimented 
Deckman, incoming president Ford Lo- 
ker and the members of the dinner 
committee for "this splendid affair." 
Governor Given Football 
Judge William P. Cole, Jr., chairman 
of the Board of Regents, another Col- 
lege Park and School of Law graduate, 
an "M" Club member in his own right, 
presented Gov. McKeldin with a foot- 
ball autographed by Coach Tatum and 
his Sugar Bowl champions. 

Surprise gifts were made to Tatum 
for his contribution to Maryland ath- 
letics from 1947 to 1952 and a silver 
service to Albert Heagy for his long 
and efficient service as "M" Club sec- 
retary, a job that appears to have be- 
come perpetual. 







Rep. Sasscer 



[2] 



. 



Among those honored at the banquet 
were athletes who had received all- 
America recognition — Ed (Mighty Mo) 
and Dick ("Little Mo") Modzelewski 
and Bob Ward in football, Bill Hubbell 
in lacrosse and Jim Belt in soccer. Each 
was given a silver cigarette chest. 
Officers Are Selected 

Presented at the February 9th meet- 
ing by the nominating committee com- 
posed of Charley Ellinger, chairman, 
and Sterling V. Kehoe and Samuel L. 
Silber, the officers for 1952 were unani- 
mously chosen as follows: 

Dr. Ford F. Loker, Baltimore, presi- 
dent; Robert H. Smith, College Park, 
vice-president; Al Heagy, University 
Park, secretary; Jack Faber, College 




ruce Palmer foto 



MISS MARYLAND 1952 

Francis Swann. Miss Maryland of 1952, is 
pictured above as she was crowned at the Junior 
Promenade by Fritz Durkee, editor of the 
TERRAPIN. 

Miss Swann is a junior in A&S, majoring in 
English. A member of AOPi sorority and an 
ROTC sponsor, she has also participated on 
freshman and sophomore prom committees, 
freshman orientation, and the DIAMONDBACK 
and TERRAPIN staffs. 



Park, treasurer, and Bill Hottel, Col- 
lege Park, historian. 

Representatives of various sports 
are: Jess Krajovic, Arcadia, football; 
Lieb McDonald, Maryland Line, base- 
ball; George Knepley, Hyattsville, bas- 
ketball; Bob Nielsen, Jr., Washington, 
lacrosse; Roy Skipton, Baltimore, 
track; Andy Quattrocchi, College Park, 
boxing; R. Jordan, Takoma Park, rifle; 
Sterling Kehoe, College Park, cross 
country; John R. McCool, College Park, 
tennis; James Belt, Reisterstown, soc- 
cer; Robert Marsheck, Dundalk, wres- 
tling, and J. L. Call, Washington, Golf. 

Representatives-at-large are: Gene 
Kinney, Washington; Bernie Ulman, 
Towson; Bob James, Silver Spring; 
Sam Silber, Baltimore; W. Buckey 
Clemson, Baltimore; Charley Ellinger, 
Baltimore; R. C. Schmidt, Washington; 
Joe Deckman, Washington, and officers 
of the campus "M" Club. 



Appreciation 



Worth repeating is a letter from 
M. A. Koneri, State Department ex- 
change grantee from India, viz.: 

"I had the pleasure of attending a 
tea party given by the State Depart- 
ment Division of Exchange of Persons 
in honor of the foreign grantees in the 
Washington area. I would like to ex- 
press our deep sense of gratitude for 
this wonderful opportunity. 

"In that cozy little house had gath- 
ered students young and old, from far 
and near, East and West, with no dis- 
tinction whatsoever. What impressed 
me most was the unity in diversity, 
richness in variety that was so char- 
acteristic of the group that had met 
there. We were from Austria, Burma, 
France, Germany, India and 12 other 
countries. But we all felt that we 
were as though members of the same 
family. 

"We talked to one another and ex- 
changed opinions and ideas not only of 
our own countries but also our rich, 
varied and interesting experience in 
this country. A German student said 
to me, 'I love this country, its people 
and their way of life so much that I 




APPLE BLOSSOM PRINCESS 

Miss Virginia Harrington Truitt, Senior in 
A&S, who will represent Maryland as one of 
the State Princesses at the T>2 Apple Blossom 
Festival at Winchester, Va. 

The Maryland Princess is the daughter of 
Dr. and Mrs. R. V. Truitt of Hyattsville. Dr. 
Truit (Ph.D.) is a Maryland alumnus. (A&S), 
1914, biology; M.S. 1920 and was for many 
years a faculty member. Princess Virginia is 
a grand-daughter of Maryland's Governor Em- 
erson C. Harrington. 



would like to stay a little longer than 
what I have been allowed to.' 

"Yes, it is not only the professional 
skill that we take back as we leave the 
shores of this blessed country, but also 
the good will of its people. If we, stu- 
dents of today who are likely to be 
statesmen tomorrow in our own coun- 
tries, can understand and appreciate 
one another so well, can we not apply 
the same to the human family at 
large ? If coming things cast their 
shadows before, is it not a bright hope 
for the future?" 



EDITOR SPEAKS 

Neil Swanson, executive editor for 
the Sunpapers gave another series of 
a talk to the journalism students. 
Reader appeal was his central theme. 




Bruce Palmer Foto 



"CANDY-DATES" FOR MISS MARYLAND 



Vying for the honor of Miss Maryland were candidates shown above, each and every one worthy of the top honor. Seated, left to right, a'e France 
Swann, Charlotte Loehler, Ellen Kehne, Natalie Eck, Ginger Rowland, and Joan Swearingen. Standing, left to right, are Etta Nezin. Carol McCoy. Pa 
Massing, Frances Eppley, Jane Donnelly, Nancy Blew, and Elizabeth Mattie. Frances Swann. seated at the left, was the winner. 



[3] 



"THE. WENT TO COLLEGE" 

A Report on TIME'S New Study of the U. S. College 

Graduate 

By William Bentinck- Smith 



T-IAT elusive creature, the Amer- 
ican college graduate, has long 
been a figure of myth. In one genera- 
tion our folklore pic tured him as a well- 
bred snob and her as an intellectual 
Feminist; after the first World War 
he used to wear a raccoon coat and 
drive a Stutz Bearcat, and she rolled 
her stockings and let her overshoes 
flap; in the thirties he was a wild-eyed 
radical and she his free-thinking part- 
ner; and then the GI Bill brought him 
back to college wearing his suntans, 
while she, like as not, war- his hard- 
work' g GI bride, mixing domesticity 
with the Vale of Academe. 

But that large and important seg- 
ment of our population — the 6 million 
graduates of our 1,300 institutions of 
higher learning, each one an individual 
— obviously cannot be typed so easily. 



The nearest anyone has come to a com- 
posite portrait is a survey, recently 
completed by Time Magazine and just 
published by Harcourt, Brace & Co. 
(They Went to College, by Ernest 
Havemann and Patricia Salter West). 
This book, by means of 52 illustrated 
charts and Havemann's very readable 
prose, dissects and analyzes a consider- 
able sampling of this significant stra- 
tum of American society and discusses 
what it is and how it behaves. 
The Composite Picture 
The composite picture looks some- 
thing like this: the college graduate is 
most likely to be a married business- 
man about 37 years old, with at least 
one child, a home-owner in a city or 
town in the East or the Midwest. He 
may very well come from a college 
family; he more than likely worked 
his way through college, in whole or 



Major field of study 



and earnings — ~T" 




in part; and whatever else he may be, 
he is pretty well off in comparison with 
the rest of his fellow countrymen. He's 
very conservative in his political opin- 
ions; he believes firmly in American 
participation in world affairs; he's tol- 
erant on racial and religious issues; 
he's a Protestant and thinks that re- 
ligion has something to offer this ma- 
terialistic age; he claims to go to 
church fairly regularly. He normally 
votes Republican but has a tendency 
toward political independence. If he 



CHART 49 



Getting a degree 

means a move to the city 



Size of Community 



rt- 



mJ I : fsn?5-' ~>t A JTjgjrr rcffi ffi jjy 



Percent of Graduate-, 
f^TTO wno we,e BROUGHT UP in 

a community of this size 



Percent of Graduates 

who now WORK in 

a community of this size 



500,000 AND OVER 




100,000 TO 500,000 



25,000 TO 100,000 



IhMA 



2,500 TO 25.000 



LESS THAN 2,500 




CHART 6 



The cash value of the degree. 

It increases with age 



EARNINGS 

$7,000 



6,000 



5,000 



4,000- 



2,000- 



r.ooo- 




$2,344 



— 1 1 1 1 1 I 1 1 T— 

20 25 30 35 40 45 50 55 60 



Jr MEDIAN EARNINGS OF 
J MEN GRADUATES 




MEDIAN INCOME Of 
All U. S. MEN 



-" 



CHARTS PUBLISHED WITH BOOK REVIEWED IN ADJACENT TEXT 

[4] 



J 



H Age and Spinsterhood 



Percent of Women 
COUECE GRADUATES 



have not turned their hands to painful 
labor before graduation. 

Four of the 52 charts which help 
enliven and humanize the statistics 
contained in the book are reproduced 
herewith. 




had to do it over again, he would go 
back to the same college from which 
he graduated and his only change of 
mind about the place would probably 
be in the courses he took. 

Our composite portrait turned out 
to be male because there are more of 
him. If the subject were female, she 
would, it is pleasant to report, be a 
full-time housewife with many of the 
same social characteristics as her male 
counterpart. She's doing very well at 
marriage; she's a regular participant 
in civic and social activities; she ex- 
ercises her vote at the polls and is hav- 
ing just as full an intellectual life as 
the college career woman, and presum- 
ably a considerably richer life than 
the non-college woman. 

But, of course, a composite portrait 
only shows the man or the woman of 
whom there are more than any other 
type in the college graduate popula- 
tion. In a crowd of 6 million people 
there are 6 million individuals. Now 
that a college degree has become com- 
monplace, the college graduates con- 
stitute an important bloc of American 
public opinion and occupy a significant 
place in American society. Just what 
are these college graduates ? What has 
college done to them ? And was college 
worthwhile for them? 

Five Generalizations 

Ernest Havemann, the author of the 
survey, begins with five statistically 
significant generalizations about col- 
lege graduates — both male and female: 

(1) There are many more young peo- 
ple than old in the graduate popula- 
tion. 

(2) Just about three out of every 
five college graduates are men. The 
only group in which the women are in 
a majority is among those under thirty. 

(3) Birthplace seems to play a large 
part in determining the chance to go 
to college. 

(4) The chances are very good that 
a college graduate comes from a col- 
lege family. 

(5) Contrary to the popular myth, 
it is the rule rather than the exception 
to earn your way through college. Only 
29 percent of our college graduates 



Religious Emphasis 

The University of Maryland's annual 
Religious Emphasis Week was held 
from March 2 through March 6. "Lift 
Up Your Eyes" was the general theme 
of the program, which featured a re- 
cital by the University Choir, group 
discussions of courtship and marriage 
problems, skeptics hours, talks on "Re- 
ligion and Higher Education" and 
"Morals in Public Life," fireside discus- 
sions and a candlelight service. 

The purpose of Religious Emphasis 
Week is to forward spiritual progress 
and coordinate the various religious 
clubs into closer bonds of fellowship. 

Joseph James, of Cambridge, Ma:y- 
land, and Culver Ladd, of Silver Spring, 
were co-chairmen of the week's pro- 
gram. Both are seniors in Arts and 
Sciences. 



Schedule of events included: 

Presentation of "Holy City" by the Univer- 
sity Choir En the Centra] Auditorium. 

A skeptics' hour for non-believers in the 
Recreation Hall Lounge. A panel of clergy com- 

|.o' I .if Dr. .John Wirth, chaplain of Dickinson 
( iiege, Father W. Norris Clark. S.J.. profes- 
sor of metaphysics at Woodstock College, and 

Rabbi Solomon Met/, of Washington, answered 
questions. 

Sixteen fireside discussions In dormitories and 

sorority and fraternity houses on the general 
topic "Lift lip Your Eyes." 

A Faculty Seminar on "Religion and Higher 
Education" in the Central Auditorium. Princi- 
ple Bpenkers were Rabbi Arihur .1. Lelyveld, na- 
tional director of Millel Foundation who has 
just L'c-urned from a tour- in Israel; Dr. Law- 
rence D. Folkemer of the Department of Re- 
ligion. George Washington University ; and 
Father W. Norris Clark. 

A skeptics' hour in the Recreation Hall 
Lounge. Dr. Wirth, Father Clark and Rabbi 
met:', answerer! Questions. 

Rabbi Lelyveld spoke on "Religion and Higher 
Education" in the Recreation Hall. National 
d.rector of B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, he 
recently returned from a trip to Israel. 

Reverend Jesse Myers, Presbyterian Chaplain 
for the University, moderator for a panel dis- 
cussion on Courtship and Marriage, in the Rec- 
reation Hall. 

Dr. Y/ilfred Parsons, professor of Political 
Science at Catholic University, spoke on "Morals 
.'n Public Life" in the Recreation Hall Lounge. 

A piinel discussion on Courtship and Mar- 
riage in the Recreation Hall. Speakers were 
Rabbi Nathan Drazin, Dr. August Clemens and 
Mrs. Clarence Nelson. 

A Candlelight Service on the mall. 

A Benediction Service in the Armory Lounge. 

Many activities were featured during 
the week with appeal to worshippers 
of Protestant, Roman Catholic, and 
Jewish faiths. 




"LIFT UP YOUR EYES" 

The theme of the 1952 University of Maryland Religious Emphasis Week, "Lift up Your Eyes," 
was adapted from the eternal words of the ancient psalmist, David: 

*'I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills, from whence cometh my help. 

"My help cometh from the Lord, which made heaven and earth . . . 

"In this day of indecision man is continually asking for help to meet his problems. He has 
learned that the only one to whom he can turn for the true answer is our God in heaven. 

"As God made the earth we live in. He is embodied in its hills, trees, and skies, to which we 
turn our eyes in a plea to Him. This plea is for His help to make this earth pleasant to live in 
together under the fatherhood of God." 

Today University of Maryland students lift their eyes to the spire of the new chapel, which 
is His house, to search the skies and ask God for peace on earth, good will to all men. 

[5] 



Cditoriali 



HARVEY L. MILLER 

Editor 




"One Ounce of Loyalty is Worth 
Ten Pounds of Cleverness" 

-7J - OYALTY is a staunch pillar that 
A) holds aloft most of this world's 
greatest accomplishments. 
We note by the public prints that 
one of our federal government depart- 
ments dismissed an official for insuf- 
ficient loyalty although he had been 
previously approved by a lesser author- 
ity as sufficiently loyal for retention in 
federal service. 

From Puerto Rico a Maryland den- 
tal alumnus writes, "Some 
years ago MARYLAND 
magazine printed a very 
fine article on the value of 
loyalty. I retained it for a 
long time but have, unfor- 
tunately, lost it. Could you 
send me another copy of 
that article?" 
Traditional at Maryland 
One of the outstanding 
characteristics in faculty, 
student and alumni atti- 
tudes at the University of 
Maryland is the manifesta- 
tion of loyalty toward the 
University. 

When President Byrd 
stands up under uncalled 
for attacks upon him, and 
when Maryland's athletic policy was 
singled out for attack some months 
ago, the staunch loyalty in defense of 
Maryland was immediately forthcom- 
ing in indignant exception to the un- 
warranted assaults upon an institution 
which obviously has roots deep in the 
hearts of those associated with it, past 
and present. An impressive fact in 
this premise lies in the clear and con- 
sistent demonstration that loyalty to 
the University is synonymous with 
loyalty to the University's President. 

Referring again to the dismissal of 
the federal official we note that refer- 
ence was made to varying "degrees" 
of loyalty. To those who lay great 
stress upon the importance of loyalty 
at all levels of life and its accomplish- 
ments, "degrees" of loyalty are not 
easily accepted. 

(iraded Loyalties 
There was the case of a Marine 
Corps battalion commander who was 
asked by his Commanding General 
"Why do you mark all of your officers'- 
fitness reports as 'outstanding' in 
loyalty?" 

The battalion commander's reply 
was that if he did not believe them to 
be "loyal" he would not want them 
near him and that he did not believe 
loyalty could be classified like base- 
balls, oranges or pineapples coming 
down the chute on the way to graded 
markets. 



Blunders, stupid errors and honest 
mistakes can be forgotten and for- 
given but disloyalty is something else 
again. 

Loyalty is a part of the permanent 
character of the individual. Like 
freckles, dimples, buck teeth or titian 
hair, you have or do not have loyalty. 
One cannot be a little bit loyal any 
more than one can be a little bit dead. 
There are no slight cases of death any 
more than there are slight cases of 
loyalty. 

Loyalty begins at home in what is 
oftimes referred to as self respect. 
Shakespeare said it with "This above 
all, to thine own self be true. Thou 
canst not then be false to any man." 
Thus the Bard of Avon based all loy- 
alty on loyalty to self. 

A loyal person is loyal to his God, 
country, employer and employee, 
school, family and friends. 

Man's Greatest Virtue 

Loyalty may well be accepted as 
man's greatest virtue since it encom- 
passes all lesser virtues. 

Love for one another is loyalty to 
one another. 

Religion is loyalty to God. 

Patriotism is loyalty to country and 
oftimes it demands the supreme sacri- 
fice. "Their's not to reason why, their's 
but to do or die", or "My country, 
right or wrong. But right or wrong — 
my country." At innumerable far flung 
and disputed barricades good men and 
true have died, and are always ex- 
pected to die for loyalty to country. 

The Medal of Honor incidents when 
men threw themselves on live hand 
grenades, sacrificing their lives to save 
their comrades, constitute demonstra- 
tions of loyalty to those comrades and 
"greater love than this hath no man." 

In combat loyalty has paid off times 
without number. Troop leaders have 
won if they had it and lost if they 
lacked it. 

Not For Sale 

The acquistion of loyalty by a junior 
to a senior is beyond price since you 
can neither buy, demand, nor order it. 
To have it you must earn it by ren- 
dering loyalty downward. 

The world's greatest field general 
can hardly expect loyalty from the 
lowly private unless the general is 
manifestly loyal to the private. 

At the University of Maryland the 
reason for loyalty upward is written in 
the tireless zeal and devotion to the 
State, the University and its people 
by the President of the University. 

The late Admiral William A. Mof- 
fett, U.S.N., used to say, "I can tell a 
happy ship the minute I step on board. 
One can feel mutual loyalty. It is as 
readily detectable as the smell of fresh 
paint." 

When the S.S. Titanic went to the 
bottom of the Atlantic as a result of 
collision with an iceberg the vessel 
took with her one of America's great 
philosophers, Elbert Hubbard. "The 
Sage of East Aurora" wrote many fine 



articles on loyalty. In one of them 
he said, "If you work for a man, 
in heaven's name work for him. As long 
as you are part of an institution do not 
condemn it. By doing so you are not 
injuring the institution; rather, you 
are disparaging yourself. If you tn/tst 
condemn, resign your position and, 
when you are out, damn away to your 
heart's content. Get in line or get 
out!" 

Charity, one of the greatest virtues, 
is simple loyalty of one toward another. 
Loyalty demands great sacrifices as 
well as humble tasks. 

World's Greatest Example 

When men die for ideals they die for 
loyalty to those ideals. The world's 
greatest example has lived through the 
ages as the prime lesson in loyalty 
which saw the Carpenter of Nazareth 
nailed to the cross of Golgotha because 
of loyalty to ideals. Loyal men have 
many times since been figuratively 
"crucified" due to loyalty to ideals. 
Those who die for loyalty to ideals 
never die in vain. The truths which 
demanded martyrs to ideals go march- 
ing on. 

After disloyalty, which is simple 
lack of loyalty, the next step down- 
ward may well be treason. Great or- 
ganizations and great causes, with top 
flight morale, have had that sort. In 
1898 Theodore Roosevelt's Rough Rid- 
ers had their guard-house suicides, 
George Washington had his Benedict 
Arnold and the Sufferer of Gethsemane 
had his Judas Iscariot. 

Abraham Lincoln, a man who lived 
his whole life in loyalty to ideals and 
to his country, like others before and 
since, he died for loyalty. 

He left behind many fine examples 
of loyalty upward as well as loyalty 
downward. 

Like all true leaders Lincoln never 
demanded loyalty. He won it, earned 
it, inspired it. 

Lincoln's Famous Letter 

One of the greatest instances of 
loyalty downward was expressed in 
Father Abraham's well known letter 
to General Hooker. 

Lincoln was sore beset during the 
war between the states by one losing 
general after another until his prob- 
lems were solved by a Silent Man, a 
forceful man, who criticized neither 
seniors nor juniors but who, loyal to 
the great task at hand, kept busy bj- 
minding his own business. With the 
conflict over, the Silent Man (Grant) 
wrote, "We have vanquished a great 
and worthy foe. We have won a great 
war for a great President. The credit 
belongs to a determined and loyal 
army." 

However, before that Lincoln had 
his troubles. 

General Burnside was Lincoln's good 
friend. He was loyal to Lincoln and 
Lincoln was loyal to Burnside. But 
Lincoln was also loyal to the Union 
and Burnside was not winning the war. 
In the meantime General Hooker con- 



[6] 




tinually c r i t i- 
cized h i s su- 
perior, Burn- 
side, and even 
denounced Lin- 
coln, saying the 
country needed 
a "diet} a t o r." 
Hooker, who 
was to learn 
and prove that 
great ability 
and zeal cannot 
" ... go forward and give take the place 
us victories . . . "—Presi- f loyalty, had 
dent Lincoln's letter to let it be k nown 
General Hooker. that he woul(J 

have succeded where Burnside failed. 

Out of sheer loyalty to his country 
Lincoln removed his friend Burnside 
and placed Hooker in command. How- 
ever, Hooker did not win. He suffered 
greatly and many good men suffered 
with him when he drew the penalties 
his own disloyalties had created. 
Hooker had said he could win. Lincoln 
called his offer. The letter in which 
he did so is a classic on the subject of 
loyalty. 

Brave and Skillful 

"I have placed you at the head of 
the Army of the Potomac. Of course, 
I have done this upon what appears to 
me to be sufficient reasons, and yet 1 
think it best for you to know that 
there are some things in regard to 
which I am not quite satisfied with 
you," Lincoln wrote to Hooker. 

"I believe you to be a brave and 
skillful soldier, which, of course, I 
like," the President continued. 

Lincoln went on to say, "I also be- 
lieve you do not mix politics with your 
profession, in which you are right. 

"You have confidence in yourself, 
which is a valuable if not indispensable 
quality. 

"You are ambitious, which, within 
reasonable bounds, does good rather 
than harm, but I think that during 
General Burnside's command of the 
Army you have taken counsel of your 
ambition and thwarted him as much as 
you could, in which you did a great 
wrong to the country and to a most 
meritorious and honorable brother 
officer. 

No Dictators 

"I have heard," Lincoln continued, 
"in such way as to believe it, of your 
recently saying that both the army 
and the government needed a dictator. 
Of course, it was not for this but in 
spite of it, that I have given you the 
command. Only those generals who 
gain successes can set up dictators. 
What I now ask of you is military 
success, and I will risk the dictator- 
ship. 

"The government will support you 
to the utmost of its ability, which is 
neither more nor less than it has done 
and will do for all commanders. I 
much fear that the spirit you have 
aided to infuse into the Army, of criti- 
cising their commander and with- 
holding confidence from him," the 
President went on to say, "will now 
turn upon you. I shall assist you as 



far as I can to put it down. Neither 
you nor Napoleon, if he were alive 
again, could get any good out of an 
Army while such a spirit prevails in 
it. 

"And now," Lincoln concluded, "be- 
ware of rashness; beware of rashness, 
but with energy and sleepless vigi- 
lance go forward and give its vic- 
tories." 

Moral: "One ounce of loyalty is 
worth ten pounds of cleverness." 



Of Mammals and Men 

A rural philosopher on the Eastern 
Shore, who had been around since short- 
ly after the Ark and the Dove dropped 
anchor in Maryland waters, was dis- 
cussing with a group of young hopefuls 
the relative contributions various ani- 
mals had made to mankind. 

"Consider the horse," lectured the 
old timer, "an animal which has served 
mankind down through the ages. With- 
out the horse the wheel would not have 
been developed as it has been. The 
horse carried man into manmade bat- 
tles and, loyally, sometimes died under 
the man. He carried the man and his 
family over the ground. He pulled the 
plow for the farmer. He provided 
amusement for man by taking part in 
races. After the horse dies his hide is 
used by man and, in some parts, he is 
used as food." 

"How about the cow?" asked one of 
the young listeners. 

"You must," agreed the philosopher, 
"consider the cow. The cow gives milk 
and butter and, after death, gives meat 
to humans and also contributes its 
hide." 

"The chicken, too," the philosopher 
went on to say, "makes great contribu- 
tions to man. Eggs for breakfast and, 
after death, the chicken itself for din- 
ner." 

"How about the pig?" queried one 
of the youngsters. 

With a gesture of disgust the old 
philosopher said, "Forget the pig. In 
all his life he contributes nothing. He 
doesn't give a thing until he's dead." 

Then the old philosopher proved that 
he was truly a philosopher by conclud- 
ing with, "Some men are like that. 
During their whole lives they never 
willingly give anything to anybody and 
some are even worse than the pig in 
that they do not intentionally give of 
what they have to anyone else even 
after they are dead!" 



First Bird Dog 



Og, a primitive man, lived in the hill 
region of what is now Garrett County. 
What Og ate he had to kill first, at 
times in hand to hand battle and at 
other times with primitive weapons Og 
and his fellow men had invented. 

Not too long before Og some primate 
had "invented" fire. One from the other 
the men of Og's time learned how to 
make a fire. They had learned that 
you could defy cold weather by wearing 
skins of animals. First you had to 




SADIE HAWKINS DAY 

Dr. Jos. M. Ray, Dean of the College of Spe- 
cial and Continuation Studies, pictured in upper 
illustration with Ray Ashley, sophomore in 
A&S, was the only man to get away in the 
Sadie Hawkins Day race between coeds and 
faculty. 

"I'm a hill-country man myself," said Dr. 
Ray, clutching the certificate as "Doctor of 
Woman Evasion." "and I knew how to take 
cover in the nooks and crannies of the crowd." 
Fact is. Dean Ray joined the spectators, dis- 
guised in hill-billy hat, false teeth and a "he 
went that-a-way" expression. 

The race, held on the quadrangle, was spon- 
sored by the sophomore class as a part of the 
contest to choose a prom queen. 

Twenty-two coeds — all entries in the contest 
for the queen — lined up at the starting position 
behind 23 faculty members. 

Drum majorette Helen Smith, in lower illus- 
tration, roughing up captive Frank Wright, 
wore the familiar short skirt and peasant blouse 
made famous by Daisy Mae. 



fight and kill the animal. They also 
learned that you could find shelter in 
a cave or in a tent made from animal 
skins, but first you had to fight and 
kill. 

One day Og returned from a success- 
ful hunt during which he had, with a 
sharpened stone knife, slain a she-wolf. 
Og brought home with him a little wolf 
cub. Og's young son enjoyed playing 
with the cub, but Og carefully watched 
the animal's development because he 
knew the wolf was man's enemy and 
must eventually be slain. Possibly, 
Og's primitive thinking machinery 
clicked out, he should have killed the 
cub in the first place but Og, without 
even knowing it, had begun to feel the 
pangs of advancing civilization and 
education had also started to make it- 
self felt to the extent of Og realizing 
that the wolf was cute. He noticed that 
the cub was friendly and playful with 
Og's son as well as with Og. 

Further and further from their abode 
the growing wolf began to follow Og, 
keenly interested in what Og happened 
to be doing. 



[7] 



Echoes from Yesteryear 







"THE HILL," 1905 

Administration Building — The fiftieth anniversary of the founding of the College was cele- 
brated in March, 1905, at which time this building had just been completed. The structure, with 
the Old Barracks, supplied accommodations for two hundred students. It was on the top floor 
of this building that fire was discovered the night of November 29, 1912, while a Thanksgiving 
Dance was in progress. Both this building and the Old Barracks, pictured below, were totally 
destroyed. 




THE OLD BARRACKS 



One day Og flushed a covey of birds. 
With a primitive slingshot he brought 
down a few of them. 

The young wolf rushed out and re- 
trieved the birds. When he brought 
them back and laved them at Og's feet 
Og suddenly realized that this particu- 
lar wolf was no longer a dangerous 
enemy. After that the wolf accom- 
panied Og on all expeditions. Soon 
many of Og's fellow men similarly em- 
ployed these animals. 

Og was really the first retriever- 
equipped bird shooter in Garrett Coun- 
ty. He had learned to expect loyalty, 
love and service from the wolf. But, 
here, we should no longer refer to Og's 
hunting pal as a wolf. 

Og had invented the dog. 



Coats of Armor 

If Sir Galahad were still on active 
duty today he could sound off with 
"Odds bodkins and ^azooks, here is 
where we came in!" 

Modern warfare is back to effective, 



life-saving coats of mail for infantry 
men. 

The Marine Corps has demonstrated 
its new body armor, worn on patrol in 
Korea. 

Its primary purpose is to guard 
against fragmentation ammunition, the 
cause of more than seventy per cent 
of all combat casualties. 

The armor weighs seven and three- 
quarter pounds, surrounds most of the 
torso, like a vest, and permits freedom 
of movement. Its protection comes from 
contoured overlapping plates of plastic 
laminated fiber glass, and a special 
weave multilayered nylon fabric. 

This equipment follows battle front 
tests. 

Development of the Marine Corps' 
contoured body armor follows World 
War II work of the Navy's Bureau of 
Medicine and Surgery. Tests were con- 
tinued at the Naval Medical Field Re- 
search Laboratory at Camp Lejeune, 
N. C, the only service laboratory de- 
voted exclusively to the design and de- 

(Concluded on page 59) 



by Ned France 

ONE hundred years ago the area 
about College Park was rural, al- 
most uninhabited countryside. In 1856 
the landscape began to change. 

In that year a new school was 
founded. The Maryland State College 
of Agriculture was chartered by the 
State Legislature. A farm purchased 
from Charles B. Calvert, Esq., was 
chosen to be the site for the new col- 
lege. 

Immediately, ground for the first col- 
lege building was broken. The date of 
the cornerstone laying was August 24, 
1857. Finished the following year, the 
building was opened to students in Oc- 
tober, 1859, and classes began. 

The building was located on the site 
of the present 'old side' of the dining 
hall, where its looming five story facade 
dominated the countryside. Since this, 
and the hill on which it stood, composed 
the complete college unit, the area was 
known simnly as the "College on the 
Hill." 

The first building of the present Uni- 
versity of Maryland was itself known 
as the "College building." In following 
years it was called the Main building 
and, eventually, the Barracks. 

The building was built of brick, on 
lines similar to Morrill Hall, which 
is still in use. At first the Barracks 
housed all lecture rooms, dormitories, 
administrative offices, the dining hall, 
and a kitchen. This arrangement was 
very convenient for the student body, 
then composed of 50 men. 

The kitchen, in the basement, was 
luled by a cook, Charles Dory. Many 
grads still have memories of Charlie. 

Upper floors of the Barracks were 
living quarters. This arrangement con- 
tinued until 1905 when the first admin- 
istration building was completed. At 
that time the Barracks was remodeled, 
offices and classrooms were changed, 
and living areas were shared between 
the two buildings by the 200 male stu- 
dents. 

Then, on the night of November 29, 
1912, a fire was discovered in a top 
floor room of the Administration build- 
ing, which was connected to the Bar- 
racks by a walkway. The annual 
Thanksgiving dance was in progress in 
the building when the fire struck. 

It looked as though the Maryland 
Agricultural College would have to sus- 
pend operations. However, all students 
except one returned for classes less 
than a week later. 

Neighbors to the University opened 
their homes to the students, and kept 
them as student residences for two 
years. Classes were continued in the 
remaining five buildings on campus. 
Students began to live on campus again 
in 1915 when Calvert Hall was opened. 

• *••*••••*•** 
PROGRESS 
Progress involves a certain amount 
of risk. You can't steal second base 
while keeping one foot on first. 



[8] 



TiMtv&teitcf o^ "WCcvttytaact (fantfieci. 'Tftafi 



By Margaret. Michael 




Would you like a copy of the above pictured map of the 
College Park Campus? 

An up-to-date and extremely attractive rendition has 
been made by Margaret Michael, an artist from New York 
who spent three weeks on the campus during the prepara- 
tion of the map. 

The result is an 18 x 22 inch drawing suitable for fram- 
ing which would be a real addition to any home or office 



where there is loyalty to and interest in the University of 
Maryland. The map is printed in deep brown. 

The Pictorial Maps are available at the Alumni Office 
for two dollars and, of course, may be ordered by mail. 

Instructions will also be furnished for shellacing to save 
the expense of framing where desired. 

The picture shown above is, of course, greatly reduced. 




[9] 




TO COMPANY C 

I'nit Sponsor, Miss Janet C. Le Velle. pre- 
senting: an award streamer on the guidon car- 
ried by Cadet Paul B. Brown of Company C, 
.">th Regiment, Pershing- Rifles. 

Outstanding units will be awarded streamers 
to be carried on their guidon for the next year 
during the Presentations on Military Day. May 
20, 1952. 



Co//ege of 



TttiUtasiy Science 



Military Day, May 20 

THROUGHOUT the armed services 
of the United States, it is custom- 
ary to have an annual inspection by 
higher authority of the efficiency and 
functioning- procedures of that particu- 
lar unit. For the Air Force ROTC unit 
at Maryland (Col. John C. Pitchford, 
USAF, PAS&T), this higher author- 
ity is represented by alumni, parents 
of students, local and state officials (in- 
cluding the Governor), members of vet- 
erans' organizations, and other inter- 
ested citizens. 
The day for the 
inspection is 
tabbed "MILI- 
TARY DAY" 
and is TUES- 
DAY, MAY 20, 
1952 — all day 
from 8:30 A. M. 
to 4:30 P. M. 
Almost the en- 
tire history of 
the o 1 d Mary- 
land Agricul- 
tural College 
and the present 
University of 
Maryland is 
closely related 
to the ROTC. The Maryland Agricul- 
tural College, founded in 1856, was 
designated the Land Grant College for 
Maryland in 1802. In return for the 
federal aid as provided by the Land 
Grant Act, the College makes military 
training an integral part of its cur- 
riculum. This cooperative program has 
been of great value to the college, to 
the country, and to the student. The 
college has been aided in expanding 
its other academic facilities more rap- 
idly than might otherwise have been 
the case. 




Col. Pitchford 



The United States has been assured 
of a college-trained Reserve Officers' 
Corps ready and able to help in the de- 
fense of the country should need arise. 
For the student military training is 
valuable in character building and in 
making him aware of his duties and 
responsibilities as a future citizen. It 
also affords selected students an oppor- 
tunity to qualify for service as an offi- 
cer should the country be called to 
arms. 

From 1862 

From 1862 to 1941, the ROTC Pro- 
gram at Maryland consisted of Infan- 
try training supervised by the Army. 
Still under Army control, specialized 
training in the Signal Corps was added 
in 1941 and in the Transportation Corps 
in 1945. Air Force ROTC training was 
brought in after World War II in 1946, 
and it was soon decided to make the 
entire unit an Air Force one. The last 
Army cadets finished their training in 
the school year 1949-50. Col. Harland 
C. Griswold, a former PMS&T of the 
Army Program, is now retired and has 
remained with the University as As- 
sistant Dean of the College of Military 
Science. The record of the Air Force 
ROTC unit at Maryland has been out- 
standing. It has consistently been rated 
among the best in the country and for 
the last three years has been the larg- 
est Air Force ROTC unit in the coun- 
try. 

To Princess Anne 

Beginning in September 1951, the 
program has been extended to Mary- 
land State College at Princess Anne, 
Maryland. In February 1952, the facil- 
ities of the AFROTC unit have been 
opened to students of the Montgomery 
County Junior College and Baltimore 
Junior College. On the College Park 
campus alone, the unit now has a total 
enrollment of 2573 cadets; 652 of these 
cadets are advanced students, and 1921 
cadets are basic (first two years) stu- 
dents. One hundred and eighty-five 
(185) of the advanced cadets will re- 
ceive their commissions as Second Lieu- 
tenants in the United States Air Force 
in June 1952. 

Military Day is the traditional high- 




SCABBARD & BLADE 

Cadet John R. Tucker (Class '. r >l ) receives 
the Scabbard and Blade Award from Col. John 
C. Pitchford, Professor of Air Science and 
Tactics, during the presentation of awards on 
Military Day in the spring of 1961. 

A similar award ceremony will feature the 
Military Day activities on May 20. 1952. 



light of the year's activity of the Air 
Force ROTC unit. All facilities of the 
unit are thrown open for inspection by 
alumni, parents, and other interested 
parties. There are armed forces ex- 
hibits and displays. The annual drill 
competitions are held for the best 
cadet, the best squad, the best flight 
and the best squadron. At 11:00 A. M. 
the unit parades before the Governor of 
Maryland and other distinguished 
guests, and the major military awards 
(including the Governor's Cup) are 
made at this time. At 3:00 P. M. is the 
final review when the co-eds selected 
as New Sponsors for the next year 
are presented to the unit. There is a 
Band Concert at 4:00 P. M. During the 
day there are also other events such as 
the performance of the Air Force Drum 
and Bugle Corps and the Air Force 
Ceremonial Drill Team from the Head- 
quarters Command at Boiling Air Force 
Base. Everybody is cordially invited 
to visit the activities, which will be 
centered around the Armory building, 
any time from 8:30 A. M. to 4:30 P. M. 
on Tuesday, May 20, 1952. 
In Korea 

Major A. J. Eisenhauer, Military 
Science '50, wrote recently from Korea 
where he is in the G-2 Section of 
Eighth Army Headquarters. There 
was, naturally, little he could say about 
his activities but he did indicate he had 
been in Korea about eight months and 
would probably remain until the end 
of 1952. His schedule of work from 
b:00 A. M. to 8:00 P. M., and often 
later, leaves little extra time for other 
than a course he is pursuing with the 
Industrial College of the Armed Forces. 
Incidentally, Major Eisenhauer is quar- 
tered in a converted University build- 
ing. 

At West Point 

The U. S. Military Academy is par- 
ticipating in the training of ROTC 
cadets from colleges and universities 
as a part of its Sesquicentennial pro- 
gram, with four contingents scheduled 
for visits between March and May. 

Outstanding ROTC cadets are sched- 
uled to visit the Academy for three- 
day periods, in groups comprised of 
two senior ROTC students selected by 
the president of each designated col- 
lege and university. Visiting cadets 
are quartered in barracks with Acad- 
emy cadets, attend classes and forma- 
tions with them and participate in oth- 
er regularly scheduled activities. 

With "Furthering Our National Se- 
curity" as the theme of the West Point 
Sesquicentennial, indoctrination of 
ROTC cadets in the proud traditions 
of the Academy is a timely mission. 
These visits will build comradeship 
among the embryo members of the of- 
ficer corps of the future. 

University of Maryland's dates on 
the schedule were February 28 to 
March 2, 1952 as one of the Second 
Army universities. 

In Northern Japan 

First Lt. Andreas J. Moller, (Mil. Sci. 
'49) is now on security duty with the 
1st Cavalry Division on Hokkaido, 
northern Japan. 



[10] 



The division is undergoing a large- 
scale tactical training' program. 

Lieutenant Moller, veteran of Korea 
and WW II, is the aide de camp to the 
brigadier general. 



Dean Honored 

Dr. H. F. Cotterman, Dean of the 
Faculty, has been elected to honorary 
membership in the Federal Schoolmen's 
Club. There are 
only two other edu- 
cators who have 
been elected to this 
honor. 

Dean Cotterman 
has been a member 
of the Federal 
Schoolmen's Club 
since 1924. The or- 
ganization is com- 
posed of leaders at 
the college, public 
school, private 
school and miscel- 
laneous educational levels. 




Dr. Cotterman 




"They come in here fresh out of Maryland, all pepped up, and right off 
they want to start as vice-presidents!" 



Diamondback Wins 

The Diamondback Maryland stu- 
dent newspaper was awarded All- 
American honors. The paper was given 
superior honor rating by the Associated 
Collegiate Press for the first semester 
of 1951-52. 

The paper scored 1000 points out of 
a possible 1055 and attained a nearly 
perfect score on news values and 
sources, news writing and editing, head- 
lines, typography and makeup, and de- 
partment pages and special features. 



May Day 

Anne Livingston, (Junior, Educa- 
tion) was appointed May Day chair- 
man. Miss Livingston was secretary of 
her Sophomore Class and is now Dele- 
gate-at-large on the Student Govern- 
ment Association and chairman of the 
Student Union Committee. She has 
served on a number of prom, Women's 
League, and Student Government com- 
mittees. She resides in Silver Spring. 




RED CROSS CAMPAIGN WORKERS 

President H. C. Byrd presents his Red Cross check to Dr. H. F. Cotterman, Chairman for the 
Campaign Drive for the faculty and staff of the University. 

Watching the presentation, left to right, are Mrs. Miriam Basellar. Executive Secretary of the 
local chapter, I, eland G. Worthington, Chairman of the Prince George's County Red Cross campaign, 
Mrs. George Langford, Chairman of the Berwyn District and Miss Elizabeth Nelson, Assistant Dean 
of Women and also Chairman of the Red Cross Activities on the campus. 



Commencement 

Saturday, June 7th, has been desig- 
nated as Commencement Day at the 
University of Maryland, Dr. H. C. 
Byrd, University President, has an- 
nounced. 

Commencement exercises will begin 
at 9:45 A. M. and will take place on 
the quadrangle west of the main ad- 
ministration building. 

Colonel Geary Eppley, Dean of Men, 
is Chairman of the General committee 
and has appointed Dr. Allen Gruchy 
as Chief Marshal. 

Miss Alma H. I 

Preinkert estimated 

that between 1850 

and 1900 would] 

graduate this year. | 
Chairmen of vari- 
ous committees were 

announced by Dean 

Eppley as follows: 

Procurement and 

Faculty, Dr. Wesley 

M. Gewehr; Park- 
ing a n d Policing, 

Colonel James Re-| 

g a n , J r ., USAF, 

S o u n d, Professor 
George Batka; Music, 
Ian B. Randall; Seating, Professor 
Arthur B. Hamilton; Luncheon, Profes- 
sor Jane Crow; Reception, Dr. L. N. 
Cory; Facilities and Baltimore Schools, 
Dr. Ben Allen; Ceremonies, Dr. Harry 
B. McCarthy; Invitations, Tickets and 
Programs, Miss Alma H. Preinkert; 
Decorations, Dr. Mark Shoemaker; Lost 
and Found, Mr. P. Doyle Royal; First 
Aid, Dr. Harry A. Bishop. 

*•••■*••*•***•* 

DISRAELI:— 

"The disappointments of manhood 
succeed the delusions of youth." 




Dr. Gruchy 

Professor Hai 



[11] 




PHARMACY ON TV WITH ANN HOLLAND 



WBAL-TV Fotos 



The School of Pharmacy, University of Maryland, recently took part in one of the series of features staged by Station WBAL, Baltimore, 
with Mrs. Ann Holland of the Public Service Staff of WBAL-TV. 

At the left above, reading from left to right, Dr. C. T. Ichniowski, Professor of Pharmacology; Dr. Frank J. Slama, Professor of Pharmacognosy; 
Dr. Noel E. Foss, Dean of the School of Pharmacy; Mrs. Ann Holland; Dr. Benjamin F. Allen, Associate Professor of Pharmacy, are shown examin- 
ing a vial of digitalis leaf powder. 

At the right above, reading from left to right, graduate students Gordon Bryan and Homer Lawrence watch John Stotts, who is dissecting the 
vein of a guinea pig. WBAL has accented and pioneered education on television. 

The greatest obstacles facing educational institutions in producing television programs was their lack of know how and reluctance to tie edu- 
cation in with show business. This obstacle was overcome by the creation of a radio and television staff of producer, director and artist to visit the 
nchools, take the material and objects which the school indicates as valuable and translate them into terms of TV presentation. Ann Holland contends 
iliat any subject can be offered with dignity in such a way as to be acceptable to the general public and the school concerned. 



School Of 



'P&atmaecf 



^^=s^^^^iii^=^= Joseph Cohen '29 
Norman F. Storm 

SINCE 1929, Dr. Norman Frederick 
Storm, School of Pharmacy '15, 
has been associated with Ciba Pharma- 
ceutical Products, Inc., in Summit, New 
Jersey. He was Vice-President in 
Charge of Production from 1943 to 
1949 when he became Executive Vice- 
President. 

After graduation 
from high school in 
Baltimore he e n - 
tered the University 




of Maryland, in Bal- 
timore, receiving the 




ft 



the 
degree of Doctor of 
Pharmacy in 1915. 
He enlisted in the 
Army July 4, 1917 
and was honorably 
Aw Bt I discharged Decem- 
Dr. storm ber 11, 1918. Be- 

coming associated at that time with 
the pharmaceutical house of Sharpe & 
Dohme, in Baltimore, he remained with 
them until December 1, 1929 acting 
much of the time as manager of the 
Ampule Department. 

He then became associated with Ciba 
Pharmaceutical Products, Inc., with 
which oragnization he has continued. 
Starting as production manager in New 
York City, he was later made Vice- 
President in Charge of Production. 

During the past year, he was in 
Washington as Chief of the Drug Sec- 
tion of the Chemical Division of the 
National Production Authority. 



Annual Meeting of the Boards and 
Colleges of Pharmacy of District No. 2 

The Annual Meeting of the Boards 
and Colleges of Pharmacy of District 
No. 2, comprising representatives of the 
boards and colleges of New York, New 
Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Vir- 
ginia, District of Columbia and Mary- 
land met in Baltimore on February 24- 
26, 1952 at the Emerson Hotel. 

The program included two panel dis- 
cussions. Dean J. B. Sprowls was the 
moderator for the 
first one — "The 
Place of Pharma- 
ceutical Specialties 
,~ in the Curriculum 
Sand on State 
■ Board Examina- 
a tions" with Deans 
I L. F. Tice, E. E. 
Leuallen, A. B. 
Lemon and Dr. 
Benamin F. Allen 
as panel members. 
Dr. Robert L. 
Swain was moder- 
ator of the discus- 
sion "Are Two 
Types of Drug Stores the Answer?" 
with Drs. L. M. Kantner and Paul 01- 
sen, Mr. James Hill and Mr. Max Zer- 
witz as the panel members. 

The following addresses were given: 
"The Pharmacist in Community Life" 
by Dean Ivor Griffith. 

"The Effect of the Durham-Hum- 
phrey Bill on State Pharmacy Laws by 
Dean Hugo H. Schaefer. 

"An Educational Drug Control Prob- 
lem" by Dr. Samuel W. Goldstein. 

"Should the Supervision of Practical 
Experience be Delegated to the Col- 
leges?" by Vice-Dean Stephen Wilson. 




Dr. Steinmeyer 



\ 



A 



Dean Bamford 



- 



_^^^«^ (fc-<t _ Addresses on sub- 

"""^B jects other than 

ad^^^r ■ Pharmacy were giv- 

» en by Dean Ronald 
' Bamford, of the 
J Graduate School of 
■p f the University o f 

Maryland, and by 
^L Dr. Reuben G. 

\^ Steinmeyer, Profes- 

sor of Government r 
and Politics of the 
University of Mary- 
land. 

Dean Bamford \ 
had as his subject: J 
"Some Movements Toward the Im- 
provement of College Teaching" and 
praised the group for openly and frank- 
ly discussing the problems pertinent to g 
the education and licensing of pharma- 
cists in meetings of representatives of 
those directly responsible for the train- 
ing of pharmacists. He stated that al- 
though there were some groups from 
outside the profession who may wish i 
to require some methodology for all ., 
university and college teaching posi- 
tions, he felt that professional groups ' 
implement and strengthen, by such sec- fc, 
tional or regional meetings, the practi- ? 
cal methods of improving teaching. He \ 
expressed the hope that the spirit of J- 
discussion he had seen displayed at the . 
meeting would be continued and car- 
ried back to the local institutions, and 
that many graduate students will pre- * 
pare to be teachers in professional 
schools. 

Dr. Steinmeyer had as his subject 
"Building a New World." This address 
was most interesting and informative 
and there is given below a summation 
of his speech. 

Many Americans are confused con- 
cerning the basic issues of the Far East 



[12] 



PHARMACY STUDENTS VISIT PAKKE & DAVIS PLANT 

A group of third- and fourth-year students of the School of Pharmacy of the University of Maryland recently visited the Parke, Davis & 
Company plant in Detroit. The group left Baltimore late on a Saturday afternoon, arrived in Detroit on Sunday morning, enjoyed sightseeing or 
Sunday and were the guests of Parke, Davis & Company on Sunday evening, Monday and Tuesday, returning to Baltimore early on Wednesday. 

The group thoroughly enjoyed the trip through the plant, the informal discussions led by Mr. John A. MacCartney and his associates, and 
the many courtesies extended to the students during their visit. They were accompanied by Mr. Joseph Shook, representative of Parke. Davis & Com- 
pany in Baltimore, and by their Class Advisors, Dr. Adele B. Ballman and Dr. Gaylord B. Estabrook, of the faculty of the School of Pharmacy. 



as so few have a real understanding of 
Asia and its problems. A new world 
has been ushered in by world-wide so- 
cial, economic and political revolution, 
staged by the world's underprivileged 
masses. These masses which have here- 
tofore been denied the opportunity of 
improving their material status, now, 
as the result of World War II feel that 
the time for action has arrived. With- 
out time for proper preparation or edu- 
cation, these people have been trans- 
planted into a world they do not under- 
stand, and are now determined to main- 
tain whatever freedom they may have 
gained. 

Must Make Adjustment 

What this new world holds in store 
for us will be determined to a large 
extent on how successfully the peoples 
of the West will be in adjusting them- 
selves to this newly-created environ- 
ment. For the first time in a number 
of centuries, we, of the West must 
make the adjustment. This adjustment 
may prove extremely difficult. Among 
this rising tide of peoples illiteracy 
averages 78% and of the remaining 
22% only a relatively small percentage 
are qualified or trained to assume the 
tremendous responsibilities suddenly 
cast upon them. These relatively few 
qualified leaders are called upon to 
guide and direct the destiny of these 
new governments. 

One cannot hope to build a success- 
ful communistic society on a foundation 
of hatred and fear as present-day lead- 
ers are attempting to do. This type of 
society carries within itself the seeds 
for its own disintegration and destruc- 
tion. As we view the spread of com- 
munism we ask: What is it that gives 
attractiveness to this philosophy? Why 
are these people drawn to it and de- 
ceived by it? Wherever great masses 
of people for generations have been 
forced to struggle for a bare existence; 
wherever people consider themselves 
the innocent victims of a system which 
provides only for the exploitation of 
their lives and the fruits of their labors 
without promise of relief, the com- 
munistic propaganda, with its glorious 
promises for a better life will find 
ready listeners. 

Geared to the Stomach 

Communistic propaganda is geared 
to the stomach needs of people, where- 
as propaganda provided by Western 



democracy, directed to the intelligence, 
with its appeal to freedom and liberty, 
speaks in a foreign tongue. Commun- 
ism also pays its own way, by taking 
from those that have, promising to dis- 
tribute property thus confiscated among 
those who have nothing. When demo- 
cratic forces move in, reforms are much 
more costly. Providing a better stand- 
ard of living often involves financing 
from without. To expect democratic 
institutions to function among peoples 
largely illiterate and inexperienced in 
government must be classified as wish- 
ful thinking. 

Wishful Thinking 

It appears that Korea provides an 
illustration of this type of wishful 
thinking. For more than four thousand 
years they lived under an autocratic 
system of government. With seventy 
legally recognized political parties, 
each struggling for leadership, Korea 
was sent on its democratic merry-go- 
round. The Korean people were not 
provided with the opportunity for prop- 
er preparation for the new role. As 
another illustration, will the "made-in- 
America" Japanese constitution, which 
prohibits the Japanese from providing 
protection for themselves, need to be 
revised so as to provide a more real- 
istic approach to our defense planning? 
History's Lessons 

History should provide those willing 
to see and to learn numerous illustra- 
tions and patterns to be applied wisely 
and intelligently in mapping out pres- 
ent and future policies. One may be 
somewhat surprised and puzzled by the 
policies sponsored by the Communist 
leaders in China today. Why should 
the policy in China be so diametrically 
opposed to that followed by Lenin fol- 
lowing the revolution in Russia in 
1917? Lenin emphasized the need for 
development of a strong domestic pol- 
icy. Loss of territory was considered 
relatively unimportant. Russia having 
been made strong domestically, Lenin 
believed that lost territory should be 
regained, and today one can hardly 
argue against the success of this pol- 
icy. Why should China not follow the 
same policy ? May the answer be found 
in the fact that the Soviet Union fears 
a united China and that a weak and 
divided China may be more to her lik- 
ing ? War can hardly be expected to 
provide the desired check against the 



spread of communism. War no longer 
provides prosperity, even with victori- 
ous nations. Poverty provides fertile 
soil for the spread of communism and, 
therefore, war may stimulate it. In 
the final analysis nations go to war or 
refrain from participation, not for ideo- 
logical reasons, but for reasons of na- 
tional interest and advantage. 

The failure to recognize these facts 
causes many people to be disappointed 
with the United Nations. They fail to 
recognize that the United Nations, just 
as any international organization, is 
limited by the ambitions and interests 
of the nations comprising it. Until the 
peoples of the world are prepared to ac- 
cept a common standard of morality 
and ethics and are prepared to live by 
it, any international organization will 
be limited in its accomplishment. To 
develop better international under- 
standing and mutual confidence among 
nations, the proper type of leadership 
must be provided. 

Thrust Upon our Shoulders 

World leadership has been thrust 
upon the shoulders of America as the 
result of the recent war and America 
needs intelligent moral leadership. The 
proper type of leadership must be pro- 
vided. May it be that in our education- 
al system we have over emphasized the 
rights of individuals without pointing 
to the fact that rights involve corre- 
sponding responsibilities. To enable us 
to build a better America and thus to 
enable America to prove a blessing to 
the new world we face today our chief 
concern must be the building of better 
men and women, men and women capa- 
ble and willing to assume the responsi- 
bilities which have become ours. 

Mr. Charles S. Austin, Jr. was Chair- 
man for the Boards. Dean Charles W. 
Bliven of the College of Pharmacy of 
the George Washington University was 
Chairman for the Schools. Mr. Charles 
S. Austin, Jr., Dr. L. M. Kantner and 
Dean Noel E. Foss were Local Co- 
Chairmen. 

Social affairs were made possible 
through the generosity of the whole- 
salers, manufacturers and friends of 
pharmacy. 

Charles S. Austin, Jr. 

Charles S. Austin, Jr., Pharmacy, 
'Ifi, active in pharmaceutical and civic 
affairs, conducts one of Baltimore's 
best professional pharmacies and is 



[13] 




Mr. Austin 



highly regarded by his fellow pharma- 
cists as an able leader of high charac- 
ter and good judgment. 

He became a mem- 
ber of the Calvert 
Drug Company in 
■ 1939 and has been 
president of the 
group for the past 
five years. He is a 
member of the 
Maryland Board of 
Pharmacy, of the 
Baltimore Club of 
the University o f 
Maryland, and is 
currently the presi- 
dent of the Baltimore Veteran Drug- 
gists. 

Mr. Austin is a past-president of the 
following associations: Maryland Phar- 
maceutical Association, Baltimore Re- 
tail Druggists Association and of the 
Alumni Association of the School of 
Pharmacy. 

His activities also include member- 
ship on the following Advisory Com- 
mittees: State Planning Committee and 
Baltimore City Health Department. He 
enjoys the meetings of the Torch Club 
and of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon Fra- 
ternity. 

He was chairman of the Boards of 
Pharmacy and a local co-chairman for 
the recent annual meeting of the 
Boards and Colleges of Pharmacy of 
District No. 2 at the Emerson Hotel 
in Baltimore. 

Overlea Pharmacy 
Mr. Francis S. Balassone, Assistant 
in Pharmacy, resigned from the faculty 
of the School of Pharmacy at the end 
of the first semester and has purchased 
the Overlea Pharmacy, Belair Road 
and Overlea Avenue, Baltimore, Md. 

Mr. Paul Pumpian, who received the 
B.S. in Pharmacy degree in 1950 has 
been appointed an assistant in Pharm- 
acy Administration. 

With Gilpin 
Howard C. Johanson one of Balti- 
more's prominent business men has 
been with the Henry B. Gilpin Drug- 
Company since 1909. 
He we -t with the 
company soon after 
his graduation from 
College. 

Since 1948 he has 
been the General 
Manager of the Bal- 
timore Division of 
the Company whicj 
has offices in Balti- 
more, Washington 

Mr. Johanson „, „ .. _,, 

nnd Norfolk. The 
Henry B. Gilpin Company is one of 
the largest wholesale drug companies 
in the United States. 




• •••**••*•*•• 

Benjamin Franklin: 
"/// soliciting funds or contributions 
first ask of those of whom you are 
fairly sure Of (lunations. Then list than 
and show their names as examples to 
your second group, those of whom you 
entertain some doubt. Thirdly, solicit 
those you feel will give nothing becaust 
some of them might surprise you." 



Convocation, O. D. K. Taps 

Spring Convocation was held on 
Maryland Day, March 25. 

LeRoy W. Pumphrey, former speaker 
of the House of Delegates, delivered 
the main address, "Maryland's Historic 
Ideals in Today's World." Judge Wil- 
liam P. Cole, Jr., chairman of the Board 
of Regents, gave an address to senior 
students, who were honored at the Con- 
vocation. 

Invocation was by Father Alban A. 
Maquire, O.F.M., and the benediction 
by the Reverend Jesse W. Myers. The 
program included a University of 
Maryland medley by the Concert Band, 
and "There's a Girl in the Heart of 
Maryland," sung by Charles Maul. 

As part of the convocation pro- 
gram, Sigma Circle of Omicron Delta 
Kappa, national men's leadership hon- 
orary, tapped six students and two 
honorary members. Selected for hon- 
orary membership were Judge Wil- 
liam P. Cole, former congressman 
and at present Chairman of the Uni- 
versity's Board of Regents and the 
State Board of Agriculture and Judge 
of the U. S. Court of Customs Appeals 
in New York, and the Honorable LeRoy 
W. Pumphrey, former speaker of the 
House of Delegates and outstanding- 
authority on the Maryland State his- 
tory. 

Students tapped included Morton 
Cohen, outstanding- for athletics and 
scholarship, Ronald Pierce and Stanley 

Rubenstein , 

noted for work 

on social affairs 

and publica- 

tions, William 

Merrill for 

scholarship, 

Donald Soder- 

berg, outstand- 
ing athlete, and 

James Sinclair, 

outstanding i n 

social affairs. 

The candidates 

presented by 

members of 

ODK, were wel- 

corned by G. 
Lawson Jump, president of the fra- 
ternity, and were given blue carnation 
boutonnieies. There are now 21 active 
members of the Sigma Circle. 

James Sinclair, Morton Cohen, and 
Donald Soderberg are from Baltimore; 
Ronald Pierce and Stanley Rubenstein 
a>e from Washington, D. C, and Wil- 
li;; m Merrill is from Elkton, Md. Mer- 
i ill will graduate in June, 1952, while 
the other tappees will remain at the 
University for another year. 

Leroy W. Pumphrey, the main speak- 
er at the convocation exercises, declared 
that "The founders of Maryland have 
planted seeds of freedom which will 
be reaped in years to come." 

After giving the historical back- 
ground of the state, Mr. Pumphrey 
stated that "Free men got together and 
enacted legislation in spite of orders 
from the King of England. This was 
the first beginning of representative 
government in the United States." 




Judge Cole 



While evaluating the world crises 
facing the United States today, he 
stated "The challenge to democracy is 
a Godless challenge." Pumphrey 
warned that if Christianity is not pre- 
served the "hammer and sickle will 
sweep the world." 

Following Pumphrey's address, Judge 
William P. Cole, chairman of the Board 
of Regents, directed remarks to the 
senior class. Judge Cole expressed the 
wish that "Seniors should not be con- 
tent to be businessmen, but should par- 
ticipate in public services since that is 
where vital decisions are made." 

A medley of Maryland songs by the 
University concert band was included 
in the program. The medley, arranged 
by Dr. Westervelt Romaine, included 
songs of the State and the University. 

The University ROTC also took part 
in the exercises. 

In addition to honoring the senior 
class, the convocation commemorated 
"Maryland Day" in celebration of the 
landing of the Calverts at St. Mary's 
City on March 25, 1634. Each year the 
University pays homage to the found- 
ing of the state of Maryland. 



WBAL-TV 

In conjunction with the management 
of WBAL— TV and Mrs. Anne Holland, 
the Baltimore Schools of the University 
of Maryland presented a series of pro- 
grams beginning December, 1951. The 
presentations are given on Tuesday at 
10:00 P. M., which appears to be a very 
desirable time. The telecasts have gone 
on with regularity each week. There 
have been contributions from the Den- 
tal, Pharmacy and Medical Schools. 
The School of Nursing and the School 
of Law are expected to participate in 
future programs. The following pro- 
grams have tentatively been arranged. 

February 26 — Dr. John A. Wagner. School of 

Medicine 
March 4 — Dr. Eduard Uhlenhuth, School of 

Medicine 
March 11 — Dr. Harry M. Robinson, Jr., School 

of Medicine 
March 18 — Dr. George P. Hager, Jr., School 

of Pharmacy 
March 25 — Dr. J. Mason Hundley. Jr.. School 

of Medicine 
April 1 — Dr. Milton S. Sacks, School of Medi- 
cine 
April 8 — President Byrd and Deans of the 4 

Baltimore Schools 
April 15 — Dr. Charles Bagley. Jr.. School of 

Medicine 
April 22 — Dr. J. Ben Robinson. Dean, School 

of Dentistry 
April 29 — Miss Florence M. Gipe, Director, 

School of Nursing 
May ti— Prof. G. Kenneth Reiblich, School of 

Law 

From what we can ascertain, the pro- 
grams have been enthusiastically re- 
ceived. They have been informative 
and many interesting queries and re- 
quests, indicating a popular interest in 
these programs, have come to the Sta- 
tion and to those who have partici- 
pated. We sincerely elicit the support 
of the Alumni in popularizing and dis- 
seminating information with regard to 
these telecasts. 

The University is greatly indebted to 
Mrs. Holland of WBAL for her untir- 
ing efforts in promoting these telecasts. 

(See also items under School of Medicine and 
School of Pharmacy I 



[14] 



Anxious calls for help, reassuring words 

of comfort— all have been a part of the lives of 

The Doctor and the Telephone 




■*K. 




Dr. Charles E. Birch, White Plains, N. Y., physician, with the telephone that served him tor 54 years. 



J.n the suburban community of White 
Plains, New York, Dr. Charles E. 
Birch, 88, retired last year after sixty 
years of practice. 

Retired also was the telephone which 
had served him well for more than half 
a century. One of the old-fashioned 
"goosenecks,"' it had been installed in 
1897. 

Many times over the years, the tele- 
phone company had offered Dr. Birch 
a more modern instrument, but he 
preferred to keep this old. familiar 
telephone on the wall. 

Just one telephone — but think how 
many different lives have been deeply 
affected by the thousands of messages 
it carried, quickly and dependably. 

And think how much your own tele- 
phone service has contributed to safer, 
easier and more pleasant living for 
you and your family. 

Surely there have been times when 
no price could have measured its use- 
fulness. Yet its cost is low — just a 
matter of a few pennies a call. 




BELL TELEPHONE SYSTEM 



[15] 



Co//ege of 

^e&ieattott and 



At Pensacola 

LIEUTENANT ( jg) John F. Walker, 
Phys. Ed. '51, recalled shortly af- 
ter graduation, to active duty in the 
Navy Flying Corps and now at Naval 
Air Station, Pensacola, Fla., has been as- 
signed to additional duty in the athletic 
department as head boxing coach. The 
assignment, according to Lieutenant 
Walker, is based upon coaching experi- 
ence gained at Maryland where, during 
the '50 and '51 seasons he reported to 
the training quarters regularly as vol- 
unteer assistant student coach. He did 
an exceptionally good job of it, too. 
Walker had boxed in the Navy during 
World War II and, during a short tour 
of attendance at Georgetown, had boxed 
professionally. 

At UNESCO 

Dr. Dorothy F. Deach was the official 
delegate of the National Association 
of Physical Education for College Wom- 
en at the meeting of the United Nations 
Educational, Scientific and Cultural Or- 
ganization (UNESCO) held in New 
York at Hunter College. 

Attended Convention 

The Mid-Winter Convention of the 
Maryland State Association of Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation, 
was attended by Dr. Dorothy Deach, 
Dr. Dorothy Mohr, Miss Louise How- 
arth, Miss Mary McCormic, Dr. Ellen 
Harvey and Miss Dorothy Madden. Dr. 
Haivey, together with Dr. Roth of the 
Sociology Department, presented a 
panel on recreation. 

Dr. Mohr was in charge of the sec- 
tion on Physical Education for Women 
and the panel topic, "Grading in Physi- 
cal Education." Miss Madden pre- 
sented a dance program with members 
of the Dance Club, with Di\ Romaine 
of the Music Department as accom- 
panist. 

Dr. Ellen Harvey participated in the 
Maryland Recreation Society All Day 
Institute held at the Hamilton Recrea- 
tion Center. She served as moderator 
for a panel discussion entitled "Rela- 
tionship of the Recreation Participant 
and the Recreation Administrator." 
Miss Myrtie Hunt was a member of 
the panel. 

Physical Therapy 

In January of 1952 the University 
instituted its first physical therapy 
curriculum. Under the leadership of 
Dr. Janet A. Wessel the curriculum en- 
tails three years of study at Maryland 
and a fourth year in an accredited 
physical therapy school. 



Maryland's physical therapy course 
was made possible when affiliation was 
arranged with Boston University, Duke, 
New York, Colorado, Southern Cali- 
fornia, and others. 

Upon completion of the fourth year 
of training 1 , students will be awarded 
a Certificate of Proficiency in Physical 
Therapy and a Bachelor of Science. 

Health Ed. Workshop 

This College will offer its Fourth 
Annual Workshop in Health Education 
during the coming summer. The pro- 
gram is under the direction of Mrs. 
Marguerite Key, a specialist in school 
health education. 

Leaders in the health education field 
work with visiting teachers and ad- 
ministrators in an effort to help them 
to work school health problems, poli- 
cies and procedures. 

Foreign Dignitaries 

A group of visiting Japanese educa- 
tors, studying physical education offer- 
ings in this country, included profes- 
sors of physical education and public 
health from such schools as Kanazawa, 
Tokyo, and Kyushu Universities. The 
president of Nihon University and a 
dean from Tokyo were included. 

They were particularly interested in 
College administrative procedures, 
graduate curriculum and experimental 
research activities. Dean L. M. Fraley 
was invited to return with them to 
Japan to assist them in the working 
out of administrative problems. 

From Dominican Republic 

Dean Fraley was host to state offi- 
cials of the Dominican Republic. Ho- 
mero Hoepelmen, Secretary of the Do- 
minican Embassy and Joaquin Bala- 
guer, Minister of Education, visited in 
order to discuss ways in which physi- 
cal education in the Dominican schools 
might be improved. 

Sr. Balaguer requested that Dr. 
Fraley recommend qualified men and 
women who might be interested in tak- 
ing over educational positions in the 
Dominican Republic. Most urgently 
needed are supervisors who will be in 
charge of establishing in-service train- 
ing for Dominican physical educators 
and generally reorganizing physical ed- 
ucation in the Republic. 

At Los Angeles 
Dr. Warren Johnson spoke at the 
57th annual convention of the Amer- 
ican Association for Health, Physical 
Education, and Recreation, which was 
held in Los Angeles. The topic of his 
speech was "The Effect of an Inter- 
polated Physical Education Period upon 
Academic Efficiency." 



FOUND— CLASS RING '51 

The Ocean View Hotel, 156 Worth 
Avenue, Palm Beach, Fla., reports find- 
ing Class Ring '51. Same can he claim, <l 
by writing hotel and identifying the 
ring by indicating the initials appear- 
ing thereon. 




POPULAR IN EUROPE 

"MARYLAND" cigarettes, pictured above, are 
very popular in Europe. 

Wrote Professor Peter P. Lejins after a trip 
to Europe last year: 

"I was amazed at the extent to which the 
State of Maryland is known. 

"Apparently the activities of the I'niversity 
in Europe have caught the eye of European 
academic circles. 

"In academic and professional circles I hardly 
ever had to explain what and where Maryland 
is. Another important source of publicity is 
Maryland tobacco. 

"A vast portion of European cigarettes are 
marked 'Maryland.' I don't know whether it is 
a type of cigarette or actually Maryland tobacco. 
Whatever the reason, whether you buy cigarettes 
in Holland. France, Germany, Switzerland or 
Belgium, you run a good chance of getting a 
pack with 'Maryland' broadly printed upon it. 

These cigarettes are manufactured in Neu- 
chatel in France. The package being marked 
in French and German as follows: "Fabriques 
De Tabacs Reunies S.A. Neuchatel-Serrieres" 
and "Vereinigte Tabakfabriken A.G. Neuchatel- 
Serrieres." 



Police School 

Classes in continuation of the Uni- 
versity of Maryland "Police In Service" 
school convened at College Park under 
the direction of Lieutenant Dan Wise- 
man, head of the University's police 
force. 

Speakers included Lt. William Har- 
tung and Sgt. George Pattison of the 
Baltimore City Police Department, Ed- 
ward Cecil, Captain C. W. Magaha of 
the Maryland State Police Force, and 
Allan Murrell of the State's Attorney's 
Office. 

Subjects covered were "Boys Clubs 
as a Police Activity," "Handling of 
Juvenile Traffic Violators," "Photo- 
graphing the Scene of the Crime," "The 
Extradition and Fresh Pursuit Acts," 
"Evidence," and "The Mock Trial." 

Graduation exercises are scheduled 
for May 13, 1952, with President Byrd 
awarding certificates and addresses by 
Governor McKeldin, Senator Omar 
Crowthers, Judge Stanley Scherr, Ma- 
jor R. M. Ridgely, Comm. M. E. Ellin- 
ger, Mr. Edwin P. Young, Jr., and Dr. 
Russell S. Fisher. 



[16] 



Glenn L. Martin 
College of 



Sciences 



Robt. K. Warner '47 




President Smith 



JOHN WALTER SMITH, B.S., 
Civil Engineering- '21, became 
president of the Seaboard Air Line 
Railroad in January of this year, head- 
ing an organization that operates 
4,145 miles of track in the six south- 
eastern states of Virginia, North Caro- 
lina, South Carolina, Georgia, Alabama 
and Florida, and employs about 18,000 
people. 

An outstanding 
student, he was 
known among his 
classmates as 
"Jake." In his sen- 
ior year he was 
awarded the Uni- 
versity's coveted 
Citizenship Medal. 

Entering the Uni- 
versity in 1917, he 
very quickly began 
to show an active 
interest i n sports 
and campus activities, as well as aca- 
demics. He earned his "M" in baseball 
£,nd football and was manager of the 
track team in 1921. He served as a 
second lieutenant in the Army in 1918, 
and was president of the Student As- 
sembly under Student Government in 
1920-21. 

After his graduation, Mr. Smith had 
several years of field experience as en- 
gineer of building construction for sev- 
eral concerns. During this time he also 
was associated with the United States 
Coast and Geodetic Survey, with head- 
quarters in California. 

President Smith first became associ- 
ated with the Seaboard Air Line Rail- 
road in 1924 as an engineering inspec- 
tor of construction work. Here he be- 
gan to acquire an intimate working- 
knowledge of the Seaboard's entire 
system. 

In 1925, Mr. Smith entered the line's 
maintenance of way department, and 
became a division engineer in 1932. 

Mr. Smith transferred to the com- 
pany's operating department in 1936, 
and was assigned to the office of the 
general manager in Norfolk, Va., as an 
engineering assistant. The following- 
year he became trainmaster at Hamlet, 
N. C, a major terminal on the Sea- 
board, and in 1942 became superinten- 
dent of the Seaboard's Georgia divi- 
sion, with headquarters at Atlanta. He 
remained there until June of 1944, 
when he was appointed assistant chief 
engineer of the line, with headquarters 
in Norfolk, Seaboard's home offices. 



Mr. Smith became assistant general 
superintendent of the company in Jan- 
uary, 194G, with headquarters in Savan- 
nah. In August of that year he re- 
turned to Norfolk as assistant to Legh 
R. Powell, Jr., president of the line at 
that time. He held this position until 
December of 1950, when he was ap- 
pointed vice-president in charge of ad- 
ministration for the Seaboard. This 
was but little more than a year before 
he was elected president of the line to 
succeed Mr. Powell, who became chair- 
man of the board of directors. 

President Smith was born in Balti- 
more on July 20, 1900, the son of Mr. 
and Mrs. James G. Smith. He was mar- 
ried on September 4, 1926, to Miss May 
Appel, of Baltimore. They have two 
children, Anne, who received her Mas- 
ter of Science degree in physics at Rad- 
cliff College in 1950 and now is pur- 
suing advanced graduate work there 
in that subject, and John W. Smith, 
Jr., who is a freshman at Maryland. 

Demand Exceeds Supply 

"A demand for 60,000 engineers can- 
not possibly be met," Dean S. S. Stein- 
berg revealed on TV broadcast in Bal- 
timore. 

On the basis of present enrollments, 
this vear's graduates will total only 
26,000 and in 1953 about 17,000. In 1954 
enrollment will drop again to 13,000, he 
estimated. 

To meet requirements by industry, 
government and the armed forces, "It 
is necessary for the engineering pro- 
fession to intensify its efforts to secure 
more young people to study engineer- 
ing," Dean Steinberg went on to say. 

When asked whether women should 
study for the engineering profession 
he replied, "Yes, if they have the neces- 
sary ability in mathematics and science. 

While engineering has generally been 
considered a man's profession, there 
are many opportunities, especially these 
days, for women in design and research 
of engineering structures in all the 
principal fields of engineering, the Dean 
concluded. 

In view of the great national demand 
for engineers, Dean Steinberg has been 
very active in securing more high 
school graduates to study engineering. 
He met with the high school guidance 
counselors of Washington County in 
Hagerstown to acquaint them with the 
opportunities in the engineering pro- 
fession, and on March 26 addressed the 
seniors of Hagerstown High School on 
the same subject. 

To N. O. L. 

William B. Coffman, who received his 
MSME at Maryland in '51, has been 
appointed to the Weapons Mechanism 
Division of the Underwater Ordnance 
Department, U. S. Naval Ordnance 
Laboratory, White Oak, Silver Spring, 
Md. 

Carl Lewis Wagner, Jr., Eng. '52 has 
been appointed a mechanical engineer 
at Naval Ordnance Laboratory, White 
Oak. 

He will work in the Mine & Depth 
Charge Division of the Underwater 
Ordnance Department. 




LECTURES ON WARFARE 

L. Wilson Greene, Technical Director, Chemi- 
cal Corps Chemical and Radiological Labora- 
tories, who lectured at the University of Mary- 
land, on the subject "Smoke, Gas and Flame," 
is pictured above. 

A colonel in the General Staff Corps, U. S. 
Zrne of Military Government in Germany, Mr. 
Greene was in charge of the German Chemical 
Industry. 

He is a member of the American Chemical 
Society, American Society of Military Engi- 
neers, American Microscopical Society, Mary- 
land Academy of Sciences, Armed Forces Chem- 
ical Association, and Gamma Sigma Epsilon 
Honorary Chemical Fraternity. He has written 
a comprehensive bibliography on the German 
chemical industry and numerous papers, articles, 
and book reviews. 

His lecture included a brief historical survey 
of the use of gas, smoke, and flame in warfare, 
and discussion of chemical warfare agents and 
munitions, protective equipment and methods, 
toxic chemicals in warfare, smoke agents and 
munitions in warfare, flame and incendiary 
agents and munitions in warfare, the organi- 
zation and mission of the Chemical and Radio- 
logical Laboratories, and the effectiveness of 
chemicals in warfare. 

The lecture, for which there was no admis- 
sion charge and to which the public was in- 
vited, was sponsored by the Division of Chemi- 
cal Engineering. 

"We have entered into an era," Mr. Greene 
said, "in which technical developments mean 
as much to defense as manpower." 

"Industry and science face a great challenge," 
he continued, "for the nation that depends upon 
masses of men, however brawny and well 
trained, but equipped with outdated weapons, 
can be defeated. Our know how in science af- 
fords us the technical means of meeting and 
surmounting our possible enemy's greatest man 
power." 



Engineers Convene 

The American Society of Mechanical 
Engineers Region III Convention was 
held at the University. Engineering 
students from district III colleges took 
part in presentation of scientific papers. 
Prizes were awarded for the best 
works. 

The students toured the Naval Ord- 
nance Laboratory, the Bureau of Stand- 
ards, and the University's engineering 
laboratories. 

The annual Engineers' Ball was held 
in the Armory, Mel Huyett and his or- 
chestra playing. 

The Convention was under the direc- 
tion of the University of Maryland 
Chapter of ASME, headed by Mr. Irv- 
ing H. Shames, instructor in the me- 
chanical engineering department, 



[17] 



To Fifth Division 

Pvt. Frank \Y. Rothenhoefer, Jr., of 
Frederick, Md., has completed process- 
ing at Fort Meade and is assigned to 
the 5th Infantry Division, Indiantown 
Gap Military Reservation, Pa., for 
Army basic training. 

He received a B.S. in civil engineer- 
ing, '49. 

In New York 

Dr. A. Weinstein of the Institute for 
Fluid Dynamics and Applied Mathe- 
matics delivered an address to the 
American Mathematical Society in New 
York on "Generalized Axially Sym- 
metric Potential Theory." 

Exercise Longhorn 

Cpl. Charles G. Carpenter of Wilm- 
ington, Del. has arrived at Fort Hood 
to take part in Exercise Long Horn. 

More than 150,000 soldiers and air- 
men, including four combat divisions, 
will form aggressor and defending 
forces to test new concepts of mobility 
and firepower. 

Corporal Carpenter, a member of 
Headquarters and Service Company, 
61st Engineer Construction Battalion, 
entered the Army in 1945. 

He attended Maryland in '43-44. 

In Upper Marlboro 

Professor Morris S. Ojalvo of the 
Mechanical Engineering Department 
acted as judge at the Prince Georges 
Annual County Science Fair at Fred- 
erick Sasscer High School in Upper 
Marlboro. 

Professor Ralph H. Long, Jr., also 
of the Mechanical Engineering Depart- 
ment, acted as judge in a Mt. Rainier 
High School Science Contest. 

Pipe and Fittings 

A one-day conference of manufac- 
turer's representatives of non-metallic 
pipe and fittings from all parts of the 
country took place at College Park, un- 
der the auspices of the Civil Engineer- 
ing Department, was held to acquaint 
the manufacturers with the plumbing 
research project now under way in the 
Civil Engineering Department in co- 
operation with the U. S. Housing and 
Home Finance Agency. 

In California 

J. T. Doyle, '33, was recently ap- 
pointed Manager of the National Gas 
and Gasoline Division of the Pacific 
Coast Exploration and Production Area. 
After receiving his B.S. in Electrical 
Engineering, he joined the Shell Oil 
Company at San Francisco, California. 
He served in various engineering posi- 
tions at Long Beach, Bakersfield, and 
Ventura before becoming an Explora- 
tion Engineer for the company in 1943. 
In 1947, Mr. Doyle was named Techni- 
cal Assistant in the San Francisco Of- 
fice and later that same year became 
Assistant Manager of the Natural Gas 
and Gasoline Division at Los Angeles, 
which position he held until his recent 
appointment. 

At Soldiers' Home 

E. J. Merrick, '13, tells us that he is 
now in charge of a major building proj- 
ect at the U. S. Soldiers' Home in 
Washington, D. C. and is also building 



a large atomic proof building at the 
Walter Reed Army Medical Center 
Hospital. Since graduating, "Zeke" has 
been with the Corps of Engineers, 
U. S. Army, in a civilian capacity. He 
has been connected with River and Har- 
bor work, the construction of the Wash- 
ington National Airport and the con- 
struction of several large government 
buildings including the Army Map 
Service at Delecarlia, Md., and the 
Headquarters Group at Andrews Air 
Force Base in Maryland. During World 
War II he was with a Division Office 
which controlled the design and con- 
struction of the Air Bases from New- 
foundland through Bermuda, the Ba- 
hamas, Trinidad and South America 
down to the Brazilian Border. "Zeke" 
says after his present assignment he 
hopes to head for California and golf. 

Job Opportunity 

The Job Opportunity Service Com- 
mittee reports that to date a total of 
approximately seventy replies from 
persons interested in new fields of op- 
portunity have been received. The re- 
plies have come from members of 
classes as far back as 1930 and repre- 
sent all the major branches of engi- 
neering and all phases from research 
to sales. The Committee feels that the 
response is an indication that such a 
service was needed and that it will con- 
tinue to be of service to the Engineer- 
ing Alumni. 

Class of 1927 

R. B. Davis writes that he is now 
with the Hajoca Corporation as Man- 
ager of the Refrigeration Supply Divi- 
sion. The Hajoca Corp., with thirty- 
three Branches on the Seaboard, manu- 
factures and wholesales plumbing, 
heating and industrial supplies. 

William G. Bewley is 
with the Bethlehem Steel 
Company in Bethlehem, 
Pa., and is in charge of 
Mechanical Maintenance 
for the Alloy and Tool 
Steel Division. William 
has been with the com- 
pany ever since gradua- 
tion except for the de- 
pression years 1933 
through 1936 during 
w. G. Bewley which he was assigned 
to active duty with the 
Army on Civilian Conservation Corps 
work as a First Lieutenant in the In- 
fantry Reserve. 

Safety in Engineering 

The integration of safety in engi- 
neering curricula was the subject of a 
conference held at College Park. 

Those in attendance including deans 
and professors from the colleges of 
engineering in Maryland, Delaware, 
Virginia, West Virginia and the Dis- 
trict of Columbia, included: 

David L. Arm, Dean of Engineering, Univer- 
sity of Delaware; H. M. Cather, Head. Mechan- 
ical Engr. Dept., West Virginia University : 
James I. Clower, Chairman of Mechanical Engr., 
University of Delaware: Benjamin C. Cruick- 
shanks Professor of Mechanical Engr. Execu- 
tive Officer, M. E. Dept.. George Washington 
University : R. P. Davis, Dean of Engineering, 
West Virginia University ; Lewis K. Downing. 




Dean. School of Engineering & Architecture, 
Howard University ; W. G. Griffin, Asst. Chief, 
Division of Safety Standards, U. S. Department 
of Labor ; Darn ley E. Howard, Professor & 
Head, Mechanical Engineering, Howard Univer- 
sity ; Herbert L. Manning, Professor & Head, 
Industrial Engineering, Virginia Polytechnic 
Institute; Maurice E. Weschler, Head, Mechan- 
ical Engineering, Dept.. The Catholic Univer- 
sity of America. 

Dean S. S. Steinberg, Chairman of the Com- 
mittee on Education of President Truman's Con- 
ference on Industrial Safety, presided. 

Dean Steinberg set the keynote of 
the conference in his opening statement 
that annually 18,000 persons are killed 
in industrial plants and about 2,000,000 
workers are injured, resulting in a loss 
to our economy of three to four billion 
dollars a year. Since most engineering 
graduates enter industry, it is impor- 
tant, Dean Steinberg stated, that the 
engineer be taught safe procedures so 
that when he enters into his profes- 
sional work he may apply his knowl- 
edge and awareness to reducing our 
manpower losses. This is particularly 
important during our present rearma- 
ment program. 



To Oak Ridge 



Two research men with the Dah - y 
Department, University of Maryland 
were among 32 scientists who are in 
Oak Ridge, Tenn., attending a four- 
week course in the techniques of using 
radioisotopes in research. The course 
is conducted by the Special Training 
Division of the Oak Ridge Institute of 
Nuclear Studies. 

Representing the University of Mary- 
land were Soma Kumar and Sitarama 
Lakshmanan, both research assistants. 
They plan to use radioisotopes to study 
the metabolism of mammary glands. 

Born in Madura, India, Mr. Lak- 
shmanan received his bachelor's and 
master's degrees from Annamalai Uni- 
versity. He is a member of the Amer- 
ican Dairy Association. 

Mr. Kumar was born in Lucknow, 
India, and received his bachelor's de- 
gree from Lucknow University, and 
his master's from the same university. 

Radioisotopes — atoms which emit 
radiation — are proving valuable re- 
search tools in bacteriology, medicine, 
plant and animal physiology, industrial 
research and many other fields. They 
are used widely for tracing complicated 
and chemical and biological processes. 

The radioisotope training program, 
which is now in its fourth year, is de- 
signed to teach research workers how 
to use this new research tool, called 
the most important to be developed 
since the invention of the microscope. 
More than 800 research workers from 
45 states and several foreign countries 
have been trained under the Oak Ridge 
program so far. 

*•***••••*••* 
DR. WILLEM DREES: 

Prime Minister of the Netherlands 

"Your University has built for itself 
a reputation acknowledged far beyond 
the borders of the state of Maryland 
mid the United States, of deep interest 
and valuable participation in fulfilling 
the world task." 



[18] 



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[19] 





V 






HUMMEL AWARD 

As a continuing: memorial to the late Dr. 
Leonard M. Hummel, class of 1934, the Leonard 
M. Hummel Memorial Award has been estab- 
lished by his family and will be offered an- 
nually by the School of Medicine to the gradu- 
ate in medicine selected by the Advisory Board 
of the Faculty for proficiency in internal medi- 
cine. 

Before his untimely death, Dr. Hummel prac- 
ticed medicine in Baltimore. Following his 
graduation from the School of Medicine he in- 
terned at the West Baltimore General Hospital 
(now Lutheran Hospital of Maryland). 

The award, a gold medal pictured above, is 
of modern design and displays the memorial 
legend on a circular relief at the margin. With- 
in the circle are a number of relief figures — 
the serpent and the staff of Esculapius, a mod- 
ern microscope and a directional tower sym- 
bolizing progress in an electronic age. The 
recipient's name, together with the date of the 
award will be engraved upon a ribbon tracery 
which runs across the face of the medal. The 
reverse side of the medal shows a relief of the 
old medical building together with several im- 
portant historic dates. 



School of 



Iftcdccme 



..John Wagner, M.D. '38 



On Journal Staff 

ALUMNI of the University of 
Maryland School of Medicine on 
the staff of the Maryland State Medi- 
cal Journal, include Dr. George H. 
Yeager, Editor, and Drs. Emil Novak 
and John A. Wagner on the Editorial 
Board. 

University of Maryland Alumni in 
office on the medical and chirurgical 
faculty of the State of Maryland in- 
clude Dr. Yeager as Secretary and Dr. 
Everett S. Diggs, Assistant Secretary. 

Councilors include Maryland gradu- 
ates: Drs. C. Reid Edwards, Chairman, 
Maurice C. Pincoffs, Vice-Chairman, 
Monte Edwards, William B. Long, and 
James T. Marsh, while delegates to the 
American Medical Association include 
Alumni J. W. Bird, Louis H. Douglass, 
T. Nelson Carey, and Benjamin S. Rich. 

Dr. Gear To Lecture 
Dr. J. H. S. Gear, Deputy Director 
of the South African Institute for Med- 
ical Research at Johannesburg, has ac- 
cepted the invitation of the Department 
of Medicine to give two lectures at the 
School of Medicine on April 30 and 
May 1, 1952 under the auspices of the 
Sudie Thompson Memorial Fund. Dr. 
Gear is widely known for his impor- 
tant contributions in the field of Im- 
munology. 

To Faculty Board 

H. Whitman Newell, M.D., Associate 

Professor of Psychiatry; Frederick B. 

Smith, M.D., Associate Professor of 

Pediatrics; Harry C. Hull, M.D., Pro- 



fessor of Clinical Surgery; F. Edwin 
Knowles, M.D., Assistant Professor of 
Ophthalmology, and Frank D. Kalt- 
reider, A.B., M.D., Associate Professor 
of Obstetrics, have been elected to the 
Faculty Board. 

On WBAL-TV 

In the relatively brief time "Live 
and Help Live" has been on the air, the 
University of Maryland medical pro- 
gram (WBAL-TV 10 to 10:30 P. M., 
Tuesday nights) has become the high- 
est rated non-sponsored public service 
broadcast produced and telecast in the 
Baltimore area. 

The most recent surveys conducted 
by the American Research Bureau give 
"Live and Help Live," a rating of 5.2, 
remarkably high in view of the fact 
the program competes with such stal- 
wart drawing cards as wrestling and a 
network amateur show. 

The "5.2" figure means that 19,000 
television sets in the Baltimore area 
are tuned to the University of Mary- 
land broadcast each Tuesday night and 
that about 47,000 persons are watching 
those sets. This is factual, statistical 
tribute to the careful thinking and im- 
aginative production of the University 
of Maryland shows and proves that in- 
telligence can be popular. 

There have been countless personal 
manifestations of the program's popu- 
larity — in letters, by phone calls, in the 
person-to-person comments from mem- 
bers of the television audience. 

Following are a few of the typical 
letters. 

"It was very gratifying to see your program 
"Live and Help Live." You are to be com- 
mended on your decision to show this type of 
subject. I would like to see more of the same. 
Hoping that this is a definite step in regular 
scheduling of this type of program." — Walter 
D. Stew, 3917 Fordleigh Road, Baltimore. 

"We certainly did enjoy your program "Live 
and Help Live" last evening on TV. It was 
very interesting and we hope to see more pro- 
grams like it as it lets us know just what won- 
derful work our doctors are doing." — The Eder 
Family, 27 Dunvale Road, Towson. 

"For some time I 
have been following 
the programs moni- 
tored so ably by Mrs. 
Paul Holland and 
produced in coopera- 
tion with the Univer- 
s i t y of Maryland 
Medical School. 

"I think this is one 
of the most interest- 
ing and instructive 
programs on the air, 
and congratulate you 
for presenting to the 
community a pro- 
gram of real public 
service. 

"I have heard a lot 
of people comment on 
the program, and it 
has always been very 
favorable." — J. Mil- 
ton Patterson (Mem- 
ber. Hoard of Re- 
gents), 120 West Red- 
wood Street, Haiti- 
more. 
"Your presentation of the University of Mary- 
land's program, "Cancer in Women" was ex- 
cellent. This is the first program I have seen 
in this series, and the best I have seen on your 
station. A marvelous job was done in pre- 
senting valuable information to the layman 
in language he could understand! 

"I have heard several people say that this 
series of programs was outstanding and now I 
can agree. I am looking forward to the future 
programs. Please help to keep them coming. 
"I commend you for helping to bring good, 
worthwhile programs to the television audience." 
Mis. Helen S. Matthews. (>28 East 35th Street, 

Baltimore- 




Mr. Patterson 



"May I add my thanks of appreciation to the 
wonderful program which you conduct on 
WHAL-TV. I know you must receive thousands 
of such letters but since you seem such a won- 
derful person I feel that you will take time to 
read this one. 

"The program was especially interesting be- 
cause D. J. Mason Hundley, Jr., performed a 
radium treatment on me. I was in to see him 
Monday for my usual six month check up and 
up to the present date the treatment has proved 
very successful. I feel 1 owe a great deal to 
my own Dr. Harry L. Kates who turned me 
over to Dr. Hundley who in turn did such a 
remarkable job on me. 

"Of course, I am not one of those who let 
modesty keep them from having a physical ex- 
amination and when I noticed something out 
of the ordinary I went to Dr. Kates for advice. 
If periodical exams can keep me from cancer 
that is what I intend to have done. All of your 
programs have been very educational and 1 
sincerely hope that they will go on indefinitely. 
Thank you for being kind enough to read this 
and if at any time I can be of service to you 
please call on me. 

"Good luck to you and all the staff at Uni- 
versity of Maryland and WBAL-TV." — Laura 
M. Rahm, 743 Washington Boulevard, Baltimore. 

(See illustration on page 12) 



Many Years 
The career of H. B. Hower of Ber- 
wick, Pennsylvania, began with a de- 
gree from the Old College of Physicians 
and Surgeons in 1887. While Dr. Hower 
did not reveal his age, it is well known 
that he still attends the families of old 
friends and continues an active life. 

For some twenty years, Dr. Hower 
had a country practice which he fol- 
lowed with a posi- 
tion as Superinten- 
dent of the private 
hospital in Scranton, 
[Pennsylvania. He 
was the first phy- 
sician in Scranton to 
I enlist for service in 
World War I and 
I was sent to the base 
(hospital at Camp 
Seviere, S. C. There 
jhe served succes- 
sively in every posi- 
'tion from Ward Sur- 
geon to Chief of the 
Medical Section. 

A big disappointment to Dr. Hower 
was the refusal of his Commanding 
Officer to break up his staff for over- 
seas service. A successor yielded to the 
request for foreign service for this 
Doctor, but the flu epidemic called a 
halt to troop movements. Dr. Hower 
was then appointed Chief of a Medical 
Section which was organized and 
equipped for the crossing. While wait- 
ing for orders to leave, the Armistice 
was signed and as he expressed it, 
"Our hope of being real soldiers was